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Full text of "Richard Frotscher's almanac and garden manual 1891 for the southern states, New Orleans, La"

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ALMANAC 




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FOR THE 

SOUTHERN STATES 



9 



esigned: 



To GIVE Directions for the Cultivation of Vegetables, 

AS PRACTICED IN THE SOUTH. 



Entered according to Act of Congress by Richaed Fkotschee, in the Ofi&ce of the Librarian at 
Washington, in the year 1877. 



ae^ehouse: 
15 & 17 IDU MAINE STREET, 

NEAR THE FRENCH MARKET, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



GEO. MULLEE, PRINTER, 50 BIEKVILLE STREET, 
1891. 




^c-^. 



INTRODUCTION 



I have much pleasure in laying before my friends and customers the 
fourteenth annual edition of my 

^Imanac and Garden J^anual, 

which, like good wine, improves with age, judging by the yearly increas- 
ing demand for it. 

I have now passed the T\^^NTY-FIFTH, — the Silver Anniversary of 
my entrance into the Seed Business, and the most gratifying fact that 
marks the memories that span that period is, that I have earned the con- 
fidence and esteem of my patrons, by the energy, promptness and honor- 
able dealing, which has ever been my pride and care to show to one and 
all. 

I have an extensive stock, both domestic and foreign, embracing 
several new varieties which will be valuable to the trade. 

I would here remark that I never rush untried articles upon my cus- 
tomers, under the plea of ' ' JSToveUies .' ' When I recommend something 
new, you may be sure that it has been well tested and is worthy of your 
attention. 

My aim in presenting this work annually to the farmers and garden- 
ers of the South, is to give in a plain, concise and intelligible manner, 
such practical instructions and directions as will aid them in their work, 
and while I am necessarily careful in the distribution of my Manual, all 
those who desire the information it contains are heartily welcome to its 
benefits. 

Grateful for the constantly increasing trade of the past twenty-five 
years, and pledging in the future as in the days that are gone by, prompt 
and careful attention to all favors, I am. 

Yours truly, 

EICHARD FROTSCHER. 



EICHAKD FROTSCHEK'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



SEEDS BYiVIAgL. 



Seeds can be sent by mail to any part of the United States in packages not exceeding four 
pounds, at eight cts. per pound, or one cent for two ounces, or fraction thereof. On seeds 
ordered in papers or by the ounce I prepay the postage, except on peas, beans and corn. This 
refers to large sized papers which are sold at one dollar per dozen, YrTaen ordered by the pound 
eigflit cents per pound postage has to be added to the price of the seeds; to peas, beans and 
corn, fifteen cents per quart. 

All packages are put up in the most careful manner, and every precaution taken to insure 
their reaching their destination in safety. Purchasers living at any place where my seeds are 
not sold, are requested to write- to me to obtain their supplies. This will be more profitable than 
to buy from country stores where seeds left on commission, are often kept tUl all power of ger- 
mination is destroyed. As seed merchants, who give their goods out on commission, rarely col- 
lect what is not sold, oftener than once every twelve months, and as Lettuce, Spinach, Parsnip, 
Carrots, and many other seeds will either not sprout at all or grow imperfectly if kept over a 
summer in the South — to buy and plant such, is but money, time and labor wasted. 

Here in our chmate, where we plant garden vegetables as fi'eely in autumn as in spring, and 
where often the seeds have to be put in the ground when the weather is very warm, it is an 
indispensable necessity to have perfectly fresh seeds. 

My arrangements with my growers are made so that I receive the new crop, expressly 
cleaned for me, as soon as it is matured. The varieties which are not raised in the North, I 
order from Europe, and have them shipped so as to reach me about the beginning of August, 
jnst the time they are needed for fall planting. By following this plan I have always a full 
supply of fresh seeds of undoubted germinating qualities, while dealers, who sell on commission, 
have only those left from the winter previous. 

On the receipt of one dollar I will mail thirteen, large size papers of seeds, put up the same 
as seeds sold by the pound. These papers can be selected from this Catalogue, and include four 
papers of either Beans or Peas, in the thirteen papers. Or, for the same amount, I will mail 
twenty smaller papers, including four papers of either Peas or Beans, This is done to enable 
consumers to get reliable seeds in good size papers in jDlaces where my seeds are not sold, THe 
papers put up by Northern seedsmen are so small that of some varieties they hardly contain 
enough to do any good. The low prices charged to merchants are made at the expense of 
consumers. My papers are large and worth the full value of the money paid for them. 

It cannot be too well impressed on the minds of all cultivators of vegetables, that most 
seeds kept through a summer in this climate loill not grow, and that all who use such seeds will 
be losers. 

All seeds that leave my establishment are thoroughly tested. 

Having received a great many complaints that letters which were addressed to me and con- 
tained money, were not answered, I must state that these letters never reached me, and, there- 
fore, would caution my customers not to send any mone}- in letters without registering same. 
By sending one dollar, or upwards, the cost, ten cents, can be charged to me. The cheapest 
and surest way is money order or draft, but where they cannot be had, letters have to be 
registered, which can be done at any Post Ofiice. 



A Few Remarks on Raismg Vegetables foe Shipping. 

Within the past few years the raising of early vegetables for shipping West has become quite 
an item in the neighborhood of New Orleans and is assuming larger proportions everj' year. We 
have advantages here, which are not found elsewhere, for that branch of industry. Freights 
have been reduced to all points from here, and special cars, built expressly for carrying green 
vegetables and fruit, have been put on the Kailroads. We are earlier here than at any other 
point, and with the rich ground we have, and the large supply of manure to be had for the 
hauling only, early vegetables can be raised vevy successfully. 

Almost every kind of vegetables are shipped from here, but Beans, Cucumbers,^ Beets, 
Tomatoes, Cabbage and Peas form the bulk of shipment. For Beans, the Dwarf Wax, Improved 
Valentine and "Best of All" are principally planted for shipping purposes; the latter carry well 
and find ready sale. The Wax varieties do well in a dry season, but in a wet one they are apt 
to spot, which makes them unfit for shipping. The Wardwell's Kidney Wax and dwarf Flageolet 
have the preference amongst the dwarf sorts. The Flageolet Wax Pole is the best kind and fol- 
lows the dv\^arf varieties in close succession. If they have had a good season to grow, so they 
arrive in good order at destination, they will sell higher 'than any other variety. The Crease 
Back — a green podded Pole Bean introduced here by me — is well adapted for shipping. It is very 
early and will follow the Dwarf Beans closely in maturing. Thousands of bushels of green pods 
are shipped from here to the Western markets. They are generally stenciled "Mobile Beans," 
which name is wrongly applied. Very few of this variety are planted at that place. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



In the way of Cucumbers, the Improved White Spine and New Orleans Market are the best 
varieties, as they bear abundantlj^ keep their color better, and are superior for shipping to any 
other. I have been supplying the largest growers in this vicinity in that line with seed, the 
stock of which cannot be surpassed in quality. Of Beets only the dark red Blood Turnip or the 
Egyptian should be planted for shipping purposes. The Egyptian is a very quick growing 
variety, and should not be sown quite so early as the Blood Turnip, which ought to be sown in 
September and October; for the former variety, January is time enough. 

For Tomatoes, the Extra Early Dwarf comes in bearing first, but should be planted only 
for the first crop, as when large varieties come in the market, the former do not sell as well. 
Great improvements have been made of late years in Tomatoes; the varieties raised and intro- 
duced by Livingston's Sons are perfect, and hardly any improvement can be made on such 
varieties as the Paragon, Favorite, Acme and Beauty. New Orleans is not a good point to ship 
Tomatoes from as they hardly ever arrive at destination in good condition. Along the Jackson 
K. K., where the land is more sandy, a better article is raised for shipping. Lettuce is shipped 
quite extensively; the New Orleans Improved Passion is used principally for that purpose. 

Potatoes and Onions are shipped in large quantities, but the former are very uncertain in 
regard to prices. Owing to the late frost 28th of February and 1st of March, all tender vegeta- 
bles were killed. Early planted potatoes cut to the ground, when the vines were already too 
large, they did not sprout again, and therefore had to be dug; the yield was poor and quality 
also, but they brought good prices. Potatoes j ust planted before the freeze and shortly after 
produced very fine tubers and large crops, the largest ever made in Louisiana; but as the acre- 
age was small, owing to the scarcity of seed, the quantity was not so large. The fluctuation in 
price was remarkable, from $6.00 per bbl. they went down to $2.50 within three weeks, but did 
not stop there, they came down as low as a dollar, during the latter part of May. From there 
towards the end of the x)otato season, they went up again and sold as high as $4.00 per barrel, 
when Western potatoes shipped here could be bought as low as $3.00 per bbl. The frost of 
March the 1st ruined the Onions, most of them took the blight. Very few good lots came to 
the market, these brought high prices; the majority, however, were very poor and had to be 
sold low. The same frost ruined the crop of Cj-eole Onion Seed; there was but very little made. 
My growers failed entirely, they did not make a pound. Onions will be a scarce article next 
Spring. I have imported some genuine seed from "■Bermuda," 'which is the next best to the 
Creole. The Italian varieties have not given any satisfaction in my trials; they are only good 
when they can be sold bunched. This failure of the Creole Onion Seed is a heavy loss to the 
truck farmers and gardeners, as we raise and ship thousands of barrels. 

The Cabbage crop was good, the best made for years, and sold at remunerative prices, both 
Fall and Spring crop. For Fall we use the Superior Flat Dutch and a small percentage of 
earlier varieties, such as Brunswick, Early Summer, Early Flat Dutch and Early Drumhead. 
For Spring, Improved Early Summer and Brunswick are used almost exclusively. The surest 
way is to sow the seeds during November in cold frames or in at least a sheltered j^lace, where 
they can be protected from cold in case of necessity. — Beets and Cucumbers paid well, that is 
the latter raised in frames. Those grown in the open ground turned out very poorly. — Peas did 
not pay, they were frozen by the 1st of March, just as they commenced to bear, those planted 
after that date came too late for shipping. Same thing with the beans; they were cut down by 
the same frost. Large quantities were planted immediately after, consequently beans came all 
at one time, rather late already in the season. The shipping season was short; there are too 
many raised here for home consumption. 

The Muvsk Melon crop, a very important one for here, was almost a complete failure. The 
Osage Melon, so highly prized in the West, did worse than the New Orleans Market Melon. — 
Tomatoes paid well. — Of late a good rhany Eggplants are shipped; they have paid well; for this 
purpose I recommend the Nev/ Orleans Market variety which stands the heat well and the fruit 
carries better when shipped than the New York Market. The kind we cultivate here is oblong, 
dark purple; perfectly thornless on the stems and leaves. — Eadishes for shipping are raised con- 
siderably. The Long Scarlet short top is used for that purpose. 

Gardeners and others who contemplate raising vegetables for shipping, are invited to give 
me a call. From the fact that all staple articles are raised for me by contract, in such sections 
best suited to mature the varieties we need for our climate, and the interest I take in the seed 
business, coupled with a thorough knowledge of same, enables me to assist in making selections 
of seeds for the purpose. The interest of my customers and mine are identical. My stock is 
the best selected and largest in the South. 



I receive a good many letters which are plainly enough written, except the signature. To 
insure prompt tilling of orders, I ask all customers and others . writing to me, to write their 
names plainly; at the same time, never fail to give the name of the nearest Post Office. Also, 
write out the order in columns, not in the body of the letter. Some letters came in ^\'ithout 
any signature ; when the Post Office was properly given, I returned the letter to the Post Master 
of that place, and in some instances have traced up the writer in that way. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



1st Month. 



JANUARY. 



31 Days. 



Calcixlated for the Latitude of tlie So\atliern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter 3d. 

New Moon lOd. 

First Quarter 17d. 

Full Moon 24d. 



4h. 52m. Morning. 

9h. 43m. Morning. 

12h. 57m. Morning. 

7h. 5m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

li. m. 


Moon 
r. & s. 

h. m. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 
2 
3 


Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 


7 9 
7 8 
7 8 


4 51 
4 52 
4 52 


10 52 

11 39 
morn 


New Year's Day. 

Gen. Wolf born, Westerham, Kent, 1727. 

Eliot Warburton, Hist. Novelist, died, 1852. 


1) Sunday after New Year. 


Matth. 2. Day's length, 9h. 54m. 



4 Sunday, 

5 Monday, 

6 Tuesday, 

7 Wednesday 
Thursday, 
Friday, 

10 Saturday, 



7 8 


4 52 


12 24 


7 7 


4 53 


1 24 


7 7 


4 53 


2 36 


7 7 


4 53 


3 39 


7 6 


4 54 


4 49 


7 6 


4 54 


5 52 


7 6 


4 54 


sets 



Introduction of Silk manuf'es into Europe, 1536 

Vigil of Epiphany. 

Epiphany, or 12th day, old Christmas Day. 

Kobert Nicoll, poet, born, 1814. 

Battle of N. O., 1815 & Inaug. Gov. Nicholls 

Car. Lucr. Herschel, Astrono'r, died, 1848. 

1st Steamboat New Orleans from Pittsburgh 



1877. 



1812. 



2) 1st Sunday after Epiphany. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 50m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



7 5 


4 55 


6 24 


7 4 


4 56 


7 34 


7 3 


4 57 


8 46 


7 3 


4 57 


10 10 


7 2 


4 58 


11 25 


7 1 


4 59 


morn 


7 


5 


12 2 



First Lottery drawn in England, 1569. 

St. Arcadius, MartjT. 

G. Fox, Founder Sect of Quakers, died, 1690. 

"Great Frost" in England, began 1205. 

Thomas Crofton Croker, born, 1798. 

Edmond Spencer, Poet, died, 1599. 

Mozart, Musician, born, 1756. 



3) 2nd Sunday after Epiphany. 



John 2. 



Day's length, lOh. 00m. 



18 


Sunday, 


7 


5 


1 4 


Festival of St. Peter's Chair at Rome. 


19 


Monday, 


6 59 


5 1 


2 6 


James Watt, born, 1736. 


20 


Tuesday, 


6 58 


5 2 


3 8 


Coldest day in the century, 1838. 


21 


Wednesday, 


6 58 


5 2 


4 10 


St. Agnes, Virgin Martyr, 304. 


22 


Thursday, 


6 57 


5 3 


5 14 


Francis Bacon, born 1561. 


23 


Friday, 


6 56 


5 4 


5 48 


Thanksgiving for victory of 8th, 1815. 


24 


Saturday, 


6 56 


5 4 


rises 


Frederick the Great, born, 1712. 



4) Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matth. 20. 



Day's length, lOh. 10m. 



25 


Sunday, 


6 55 


5 5 


6 2 


St. Paul's Day. 




26 


Monday, 


6 54 


5 6 


7 2 


Louisiana seceded, 1861. 




27 


Tuesday, 


6 53 


5 7 


7 59 


Admiral Lord Hood, died, 1816. 




28 


Wednesday, 


6 52 


5 8 


8 59 


Henry VIH, died, 1547. 




29 


Thursday, 


6 51 


5 9 


9 51 


Emanuel de Swedenborg, born, 1688-89. 


30 


Friday, 


6 50 


5 10 


10 58 


King Charies I, beheaded, 1649. 




31 


Saturday, 


6 50 


5 10 


11 43 


Ben. Johnston, born, 1574. 





Jewish Festivals and Fasts,— 5651.— January 10, Rosh Chodeeh Shebat; 
24. Chamisho Osor. 







FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 




7 


2d 


Month. 


FEBRUARY. 


28 


Days. 


Calculated for the Latitmcie of the Soiatliern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter Id. 

New Moon 8d, 

First Quarter 15d. 

Full Moon 2Sd. 



llh. 2 m. Evening. 

8h. 52m. Evening. 

Ih. 9m. Afternoon. 

2h. 8m. Afternoon. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 


it. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



5) Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 8. 



Day's length, lOh. 22m. 



1 


SiiBiday, 


6 49 


5 11 


morn 


Washington elected President, 1789. 


2 


Monday, 


6 49 


5 11 


12 24 


Purification of the Blessed Virgin. Candlemas Pay. 


3 


Tuesday, 


6 48 


5 12 


1 33 


Henry Cromwell, born, 1627. 


4 


Wednesday, 


6 47 


5 13 


2 47 


Delegates from Confederate States meet at Mont- 


5 


Thursday, 


6 46 


5 14 


3 57 


Ole Bull, born, 1810. [gomery, Ala., 1861. 


6 


Fridaj-, 


6 45 


5 15 


5 7 


Charles II, King of England, died, 1685. 


7 


Saturday 


6 44 


5 16 


6 8 


Charles Dickens, born, 1812. 



6) Quinqaagesima Sunday. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length, lOh. 34m. 



8 


8iaaadn.y, 


6 43 


5 17 


sets 


Mary, Queen of Scots, beheaded, 1587. 


9 


Monday, 


6 42 


5 18 


6 27 


David Eezzio, murdered, 1565-66. 


10 


Tuesday, . 


6 41 


5 19 


7 35 


Mardi Gras in Ncav Orleans. 


11 


Wednesday, 


6 40 


5 20 


8 43 


Mary, Queen of England, born, 1516. 


12 


Thursday, 


6 39 


5 21 


9 59 


Abraham Lincoln, born, 1809. 


13 


Friday, 


6 38 


5 22 


1 4 


St. Gregory II, Pope, 631. 


14 


Saturday, 


6 37 


5 23 


morn 


St. Valentine's Day. 



7) 1st Sunday in Lent. 



Matth. 4. 



Day's length, lOh. 48m. 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



SwBJday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday. 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



6 30 


5 24 


12 10 


6 31 


5 25 


12 50 


6 32 


5 26 


1 49 


6 33 


5 27 


2 47 


6 34 


5 28 


3 45 


6 35 


5 29 


4 39 


6 36 


5 30 


5 19 



Galilei Galileo, Astronomer, born, 1564. 

Dr. Kane, Am. Arctic Explorer, died, 1857. 

Columbia, S. C, burned, 1865. 

Pope Gregory V, died, 999. 

Eliz. Carter, classical scholar, died, 1806. 

IT. Gaglian & T. Conner, felon poets, hanged 1749. 

Pierre du Bose, born, 1623. 



§) 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matth. 15. 



Day's length, llh. 02m. 



22 


Sunday, 


6 29 


5 31 


5 58 


George Washington, born, 1732. 




23 


]Monday, 


6 28 


5 32 


rises 


Battle of Buena Vista, 1847. 




24 


Tuesday, 


6 27 


5 33 


6 42 


St. Matthias, Apostle. 




25 


Wednesday, 


6 26 


5 34 


7 51 


Dr. Bucan, born, 1729. 




26 


Thursday, 


6 25 


5 35 


8 51 


Thomas Moore, poet, died, 1852. 




27 


Friday. 


6 24 


5 36 


9 41 


Longfellow, born, 1807. 




2S 


Saturday, 


6 23 


5 37 


10 43 


Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, murdered. 


1447. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts, 



-5651.— February 8. & 9., Eosh Chodesh Adar Eishon 
22., Purim koton. 



KICHARD FEOTSCHER 8 ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



3d Month. 



MARCH 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitucle of tlie Soutliern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter 3d. 

New Moon lOd. 

First Quarter 17d. 

Full Moon 28d. 



2h. 17m. Afternoon. 

6h. 30m. Morning. 

3h. 50m. Morning. 

7h. 51m. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Montli and "Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & 8. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



9) 


3d Sunday ic 


Lent 






Luke 11. Day's length, llh. 16m. 


1 


Sunday, 


6 22 


5 38 


11 44 


1st Number of the Spectator published, 1711. 


2 


Monday, 


6 21 


5 39 


morn 


Territory of Dakota organized, 18G1. 


3 


Tuesday, 


6 20 


5 40 


12 37 


Edmoud Waller, Poet, born, 1G05. 


4 


Wednesday, 


6 18 


5 42 


1 2S 


Abraham Lincoln inaugurated, 1861. 


5 


Thursday, 


6 17 


5 43 


2 18 


1st Locomotiye run through British tube, 1830. 


6 


Friday, 


6 16 


5 44 


3 8 


Great financial excitement, 1863. 


7 


Saturday, 


6 15 


5 45 


4 5 


Blanchard, Aeronaut, died, 1809. 



10) 


4th Sunday 


in Lent. 




John 6. Day's length, llh. 32m. 


8 


Sunday. 


6 14 


5 46 


4 35 


King William HI, of England, died, 1702. 


9 


Monday, 


6 13 


5 47 


5 46 


William Cobbett, born, 1762. 


10 


Tuesday, 


6 11 


5 49 


seta 


The Forty Martyrs of St. Sebaste, 320. 


11 


Wednesday, 


6 10 


5 50 


7 42 


1st daily paper, "Daily Courant," Br., 1702. 


12 


Thursday, 


6 9 


5 51 


8 45 


St. Gregory the Great, Pope, 604. 


13 


Friday, 


6 8 


5 5'A 


9 50 


Discovery of planet Uranus, by Herschel, 1781. 


14 


Saturday, 


6 7 


5 53 


10 54 


Andrew Jackson, born, 1767. 



11) 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length, llh. 48m. 



15 


§11 '.a day, 


6 6 


5 54 


11 59 


Julius Cajsar, assassinated, B. C, 44. 




16 


Monday, 


6 5 


5 55 


morn 


Prince Hohenlohe's miraculous cures, 


1823. 


17 


Tuesday, 


6 3 


5 57 


12 38 


St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland. 




18 


Wednesday, 


6 2 


5 58 


1 35 


Edward, King and ilart^T, 978. 




19 


Thursday, 


6 1 


5 59 


2 27 


St. Joseph's day. 




20 


Friday, 


6 


6 


3 2 


Vesta discoyered, 1807. 




21 


Saturday, 


5 59 


6 1 


3 39 


Louisiana ceded to France, 1300. 





12) Palm Sunday. 



Matth. 21. 



Day'ri length, 12h. 4m. 



22 


Sunday, 


5 58 


6 2 


4 40 


J. Y\^. yon Goethe, Germ. Poet, died, 1832. 


23 


Monday, 


5 57 


6 3 


5 21 


Peter the Cruel, King of Castile, died, 1369. 


24 


Tuesday, 


5 56 


6 4 


5 53 


Mahomet, il, born, 1430. 


25 


Wednesday, 


5 54 


6 6 


rises 


Annunciation of the blessed Virgin Mary. 


26 


Thursday, 


5 53 


6 7 


7 38 


Gov. Winthrop, died, 1640. 


2; 


Friday, • 


5 52 


6 8 


8 33 


Good Friday. 


28 


Saturday, 


5 51 


6 9 


9 34 


Planet PaUas, discovered, 1802. 



13) Easter Sunday. 



Mark. 16. 



Day's length, 12h. 20m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 
Tuesday, 



5 


50 


6 10 


10 40 


5 


49 


6 11 


11 46 


5 


48 


6 12 


morn 



Easter Sunday. 

Dr. William Hunter, died, 

Beethoven, died, 1827. 



1783. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— March 7., Parshot Shekolim 10. and 11., 
Kosh Chodesh Adar Shenie ; 21., Parshot Sachor ; 24., Purim ; 28., I'arshot Poroh. 



4th Month. 



rOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 

APRIL. 



30 Days. 



Ca-lc-ulated lor tlie I^atitTade of tlie Soutliem. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter 2cl. 

New Moon 8d. 

First Quarter ... 15d. 

Full Moon 4d. 



Ih. 10m. Morning. 

3h. 3 m. Eveninj^-. 

8h. 2 m. Evening. 

llh. 4 m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Montli and "Week 


Sun 

rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 

r. & s. 

h. m. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Wednesday, 
Thursday, 
Friday, 
Saturday, 


5 47 
5 46 
5 45 
5 44 


6 13 
6 14 

6 15 
6 17 


12 42 Earthquake at Melbourne, 1871. 

1 34 Jefferson, born, 1743. 

2 24 1 Washington Irving born, 1783. 

3 14 1 Oliver Goldsmith, died, 1774. 



14) 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length, 12h. 36m. 



5 


Sunday, 


5 42 


6 18 


4 7 


St. Irgernach, of Ireland, 550. 


6 


Monday, 


5 41 


6 19 


4 51 


Battle of Shiloh, 1862. 


V 


Tuesday, 


5 40 


6 20 


5 21 


St. Francis Xavier, Missionary, born, 1506. 


8 


Wednesday, 


5 39 


6 21 


sets 


Louisiana admitted to the Union, 1812. 


y 


Thursday, 


5 38 


6 22 


7 36 


Gen. K. E. Lee, surrendered, 1865. 


10 


Friday, 


5 37 


6 23 


8 42 


St. Badfemus, Abbot, Martyr, 376. 


11 


Saturday, 


5 36 


6 24 


9 47 


Geo. Canning, born, 1770. 



15) 2d Sun day after Easter. 



John 10. 



Day's length, 12h. 50m. 



12 


Sunday, 


5 35 


6 25 


10 51 


First gun of Civil War fired, 1861, at Fort Sumter. 


13 


Monday, 


5 34 


6 26 


11 55 


Sydney Lady Morgan, died, 1859. 


14 


Tuesday, 


5 32 


6 28 


morn 


Lincoln assassinated, 1865. 


lb 


Wednesday, 


5 31 


6 29 


12 43 


Geo. Calvert, Lord Baltimore, died, 1632. 


lb 


Thursday, 


5 30 


6 30 


1 31 


Battle of Culloden, 1746. 


IV 


Friday, 


5 29 


6 31 


2 15 


Dr. Benjamin Franklin, died, 1790. 


18 


Saturday, 


5 28 


6 32 


2 45 


Shakespeare, born, 1564. 



16) 3d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 4m. 



19 


Sunday, 


5 28 


6 32 


3 29 


Battle of Lexington, 1775. 


20 


Monday, 


5 27 


6 33 


3 59 


E. Barton, "Maid of Kent," executed, 1534. 


21 


Tuesday, 


5 26 


6 34 


4 30 


Confederate victory at Plymouth, N. C, 1863. 


22 


Wednesday, 


5 25 


6 35 


5 3 


Madam De Stael, born, 1766. 


23 


Thursday, 


5 24 


6 36 


5 34 


Shakespeare, died, 1616. 


24 


Friday, 


5 23 


6 37 


rises 


Oliver Cromwell, born, 1599. 


25 


Saturday, 


5 22 


6 38 


8 26 


St. Mark's Day. 



17) 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John. 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 18m. 



26 


Sunday, 


5 21 


6 39 


9 31 


David Hume, born, 1711. 


27 


Monday, 


5 20 


6 40 


10 37 


Sir Wm. Jones, Poet and Scholar, died, 1794. 


28 


Tuesday, 


5 19 


6 41 


11 36 


Monroe, born, 1758. 


29 


Wednesday, 


5 18 


6 42 


morn 


King Edward lY, of England, bom, 1441. 


30 


Thursday, 


5 17 


6 43 


12 51 


Louisiana purchased from France by U. S. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— April 4., Parshot Hachodesh ; 9., RoshChodesh 

Nissan ; 18., Sabbath Hagodol ; 23. and 24., First days Pessach ; 

29. and 30., Last days Pessach. 



10 



EICHAED FEOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



5th Month. 



MAY. 



1 Days. 



CalcTalated. for tlie Latitude of tlxe Soiatliern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter Id. 

New Moon - 8d. 

First Quarter lod. 

Full Moon 3d. 

Last Quarter -. 30d. 



8h. 31m. Morning. 
12h. o5m. Morning. 
Ih. ■ Mm. Afternoon. 
Ih. 5m. Afternoon. 
Ih. 34:m, Afternoon. 



DAT 

OF 

Month and Weet. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


h, m. 


h. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



1 I FiidaT, 

2 Saturday, 



6 44 
6 45 



30 



St. Philip and St James, Apostles. 
William Camden, born, 1551. 



18) 5th Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 32m. 



3 


Sunday, 


5 14 


6 46 


2 59 


Discoyery of the Holy Cross, by St. Helena. 


4 


Monday, 


5 14 


6 46 


3 31 


Dr. Isaac Barrow, Eng. diyine, died, 1677. 


5 


Tuesday, 


5 13 


6 47 


3 59 


Emperor Justinian, born, 482. 


6 


Wednesday, 


5 12 


6 48 


4 29 


Hiimboldt. died, 1859. 


7 


Thiu'sday, 


5 11 


6 49 


5 2 


Ascension Day. 


8 


Friday, 


5 10 


6 50 


sets 


Stonewall Jackson, died, 1863. 


9 


Saturday, 


5 10 


6 50 


8 46 


Battle of Spottsylyania, 1864. 



19) 6th Sunday after Easter. 



John 15. 



Day's length, 13h. 24m. 



10 


Sunday, 


5 9 


6 51 


9 46 


Pacific Eaihoad finislied, 1869. 


11 


Monday, 


5 8 


6 52 


10 43 


Madame Kicamrre, died, 1849. 


12 


Tuesday, 


5 7 


6 53 


11 33 


St. Pancras. Martyr-. 304. 


13 


Wednesday, 


5 6 


6 54 


morn 


Jamestown, A'a.. settled. 1607. 


14 


Thui'sday, 


5 5 


6 55 


12 33 


Battle of Crown Point, 1575. 


15 


Friday, 


5 5 


6 55 


1 4 


St. Isidore, died, 1170. 


16 


Saturday, 


5 4 


6 56 


1 36 


Sir- WiLliam Petty, born, 1623. 



20) Whit Sunday 



John 14. 



Day's length, 13h. 54m. 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



Sunday, 


5 3 


6 57 


2 5 


Monday, 


5 2 


6 58 


2 59 


Tuesday. 


5 2 


6 58 


3 29 


Wednesday, 


5 1 


6 59 


3 58 


Thursday, 


5 1 


6 59 


4 30 


Friday, 


5 


7 


4 59 


Saturday, 


4 59 


7 1 


rises 



J. Jay, died, 1829. 

Napoleon I, elected Emperor, 1804. 

St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury, 

Hawthorn, died, 1864. 

Cohtmbus, died, 1506. 

Title of Baronet iii-st confeiTed, 1611. 

Napoleon I, crowned King of Italy, 1805. 



21) 


Trinity Sunday. 






John 3. Day's length, 14h. 


4m. 


24 


Sunday, 


4 58 


7 2 


8 23 


Bishop JeweH. born. 1522. 




25 


Monday, 


4 58 


7 2 


9 22 


Battle of Winchester. 1864. 




26 


Tuesday, 


4 57 


7 3 


10 21 


Fort Erie captured, 1813. 




27 


Wednesday, 


4 57 


7 3 


1 20 


Dante, poet, born, 1265. 




28 


Thursday, 


4 56 


7 4 


morn 


Corpus Christi. 




29 


Friday, 


4 56 


7 4 


12 46 


Paris bur-ned, 1871. 




30 


Satiu-day, 


4 55 


7 5 


1 


Peter the Great of Kussia, born, 1672. 





22) 1st Sunday after Trinity, 



Luke 16. 



Day's length, 14h. 10m. 



31 I Sunday, ] 4 55 



1 49 I Joan of Arc, burned, 1431. 



Je\yi3h Festivals and Fasts. — 5651.— May 8. and 9. 

6., Lag Beoruer. 



Eosh Chodesh lyar 







FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 




11 


6th 


Month. 


JUNE. 


30 


Days. 




Calcial? 


\ted for the Latitude of the Southern. States. 









MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 6d. 

First Quarter 14d. 

Full Moon 2d. 

Last Quarter 26d. 



llh. 


6m. 


Morning. 


7h. 


13m. 


Morning. 


V2h. 


im. 


Morning. 


5h. 


55m. 


Evening. 





DAY 


Sun 


Siin 


Moon 




OF 


rises 


sets 


r. &s. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


Month and Week. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 


Monday, 


4 54 


7 6 


2 11 


Battle of Seven Pines, 1862. 


2 


Tuesday, 


4 54 


7 6 


2 41 


Battle of Cold Harbor, 1864. 


3 


YN^'ednesday, 


4 53 


7 7 


3 11 


S. A. Douglas, died, 1861. 


4 


Thursday, 


4 53 


7 7 


3 43 


Lord E. Dudley, married A. Robsart, 1550. 


5 


Friday, 


4 52 


7 8 


4 16 


J. Pradier, Sculptor, died, 1852. 


6 


Saturday, 


4 52 


7 8 


sets 


Surrender of Memphis, Tenn., 1862. 



23) 2d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's lengtii, 14h. 18m. 



7 


Sunday, 


4 51 


7 9 


8 24 


First American Congress at New York, 1765. 


8 


Monday, 


4 51 


7 9 


9 22 


Emperor Nero, died, 68, Rome. 


9 


Tuesday, 


4 51 


7 9 


10 14 


Charles Dickens, died, 1870. 


10 


Wednesday, 


4 51 


7 9 


10 53 


Battle of Big Bethel, 1861. 


11 


Thursday, 


4 50 


7 10 


11 27 


. Sir John Franklin, died, 1847. 


12 


Friday, 


4 50 


7 10 


morn 


Harriet Martineau, Novelist, born, 1802. 


13 


Saturday, 


4 50 


7 10 


12 30 


General Scott, born, 1786. 



24) 3d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 20m. 



14 


Sunday, 


4 50 


7 10 


12 58 


St. Basil the Great, 379. 


15 


Monday, 


4 50 


7 10 


1 32 


Magna Charter, 1215. 


16 


Tuesday, 


4 50 


7 10 


2 2 


Edward I, of England, born, 1239. 


17 


Wednesday, 


4 49 


7 11 


2 34 


Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. 


18 


Thursday, 


4 49 


7 11 


3 2 


V/ar declared against Great Britain, 1812. 


19 


Friday, 


4 49 


7 11 


3 34 


Kearsage sunk the Alabama, 1864. 


20 


Saturday, 


4 49 


7 11 


4 10 


St: Silverius, Pope and Martyr, 538. 



25) 4th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, I4h. 24m. 



21 


Suoiday, 


4 48 


7 12 


4 40 


Anthony Collins, born, 1676. 


22 


Mondaj^ 


4 49 


7 11 


rises 


Napoleon I, abdicated, 1815. 


23 


Tuesday, 


4 49 


7 11 


9 5 


Battle of Solferino, 1859. 


24 


Wednesday, 


4 49 


7 11 


9 56 


Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 


25 


Thursday, 


4 50 


7 10 


10 34 


Battle of Bannochburn, 


26 


Friday, 


4 50 


7 10 


11 10 


Dr. Philip Doddrige, born, 1702. 


27 


Saturday, 


4 50 


7 10 


11 28 


John Murray, Publisher, died, 1843. 



26) 5th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 20m. 



Sunday, 


4 50 


7 10 


morn 


Monday, 


4 50 


7 10 


12 56 


Tuesday, 


4 50 


7 10 


1 28 



Queen Victoria, crowned, 1838. 

St. Peter the Apostle, 68. 

Bishop Gavin Dunbar, died, 1547. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— June 7., Eosh Chodesh Sivan 
12. and 13., Shebuoth. 



12 



EICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



th Month. 



JULY. 



31 Days, 



Calculated, for tlie Latitude of the Soutliern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 5d. 

First Quarter 14d. 

Full Moon Id. 

Last Quarter , 27d. 



lOh. 38m. Evening. 

12h. 8m. Morning. 

8h. 34m. Morning. 

llh. 12m. Evening. 



5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 





DAT 

ov 
Month and Week. 


Sun 
rises 

h. m. 


Sun 
sets 

li. m. 


Moon 
r. & 8. 

li. m. 


CHRONOLOGY OF lilPOETANT EVENTS. 


1 
2 
3 
4 


Wednesday, 
Thursday,' 
Friday, 
Saturday, 


4 50 
4 51 
4 51 
4 51 


7 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 


1 58 

2 31 

2 56 

3 34 


Battle of Malvern HHl, 1862. 
Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 
Quebec founded, 1608. 
Independence of the United States, 1776. 


27) 6th Sunday after Trinity. 


Matth. 5. Day's length, 14h. 18m. 



Sunday, 


4 51 


7 9 


sets 


Monday, 


4 52 


7 8 


8 8 


Tuesday, 


4 52 


7 8 


8 50 


Wednesday, 


4 52 


7 8 


9 30 


Thursday, 


4 53 


7 7 


9 55 


Friday, 


4 53 


7 7 


10 25 


Saturday, 


4 54 


7 6 


10 45 



Queen Magdalen of Scotland, died, 1537. 

Th. More, Chancel, of Eng. beheaded, 1535. 

Dr. Th. Blacklock, "the blind poet," died, 1791. 

John de la Fontaine, born, 1621. 

Zachary Taylor, died, 1850. 

John Calyin, theologian, born, 1509. 

J. Q. Adams, born, 1767. 



28) 7th Sunday after Trinity. 



Marli 



Day's length, 14h. 12m. 



12 


Sunday, 


4 54 


7 6 


11 15 


Kobt. Stevenson, engineer, etc., died, 1850. 


13 


Monday, 


4 55 


7 5 


11 45 


Pope John IH died, 573. 


14 


Tuesday, 


4 56 


7 4 


morn 


Dog days begin. 


lb 


Wednesday, 


4 56 


7 4 


12 44 


St. S^-ithin's day. 


16 


Thursday, 


4 57 


7 3 


1 11 


Great riot in New York city, 1863. 


IV 


Friday, 


4 57 


7 3 


1 51 


Dr. Isaac Watts, born, 1647. 


18 


Saturday, 


4 58 


7 2 


2 13 


St. Symphorosia and 7 sons, Martyrs, 120. 



29j 8th Sunday after Trinity 



Matth. 7. 



Da3''s length, 14h. 2m. 



19 


Sunday, 


4 59 


7 1 


3 9 


St. Vincent de Paul, confessor, 1660. 


20 


Monday, 


4 59 


7 1 


3 39 


Confed. Congress at Eichmond, 1861. 


21 


Tuesday, 


5 


7 


rises 


Battle of Bull Kun, 1861. 


22 


Wednesday, 


5 1 


6 59 


8 36 


Urania discovered, 1824. 


23 


Thui'sday, 


5 1 


6 59 


9 12 


First Olympiad, 776, B. C. 


24 


Friday, 


5 2 


6 58 


9 45 


Curran, born, 1750. 


2b 


Saturday, 


5 2 


6 58 


10 14 


St. James the Great. 



30) 9th Sunday after Trinity. 



Lulie 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 54m. 



26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Fridav, 



5 3 


6 57 


11 44 1 


5 4 


6 56 


11 19 


5 4 


6 56 


11 49 


5 5 


6 55 


morn 


5 6 


6 54 


1 3 


5 7 


6 53 


2 6 



Flood at Pittsburg, 1874. 
Atlantic cable, laid, 1866. 
Battle before Atlanta, Ga., 1864. 
Albert I, Emp. of Germany, born, 1289. 
Westlield Explosion, N. Y. Harbor, 1871. 
St. Ignatius Loyola, died, 1556. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— July 6. and 7., Eosh Chodesh Tamuz 

23., Zom Tamuz. 



FOR THE S0UTHER:H STATES. 



13 



8th Month, 



AUGUST. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the t^atitude of the Soiathern. States. 



New Moon. . . 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon. . . 
Last Quarter . 



MOON'S PHASES. 



4d. llh. 

12d. 3h. 

19d. 4h. 

26d. 6h. 



2m. Morning. 
51m. Evening. 

8m. Evening. 
49m. Morning. 



DAY 

or 
Month and Week. 


Sun 
riBBS 

h. m. 


Sun 
Beta 

h. m. 


Moon 
r, &8 

h. m. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 


Saturday, 


5 7 


6 53 j 2 33 1 Harriet Lee, Novelist, died, 1851. 



31) 10th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 19. 



Day's length, 13h. 44m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 8 


6 52 


3 24 


5 9 


6 51 


4 1 


5 10 


6 50 


sets 


5 11 


6 49 


7 50 


5 12 


6 48 


8 29 


5 13 


6 47 


8 50 


5 14 


6 46 


9 16 



Mehemed Ali, Pasha of Egypt, died, 1849. 

Crown Point taken, 1759. 

John Banim, Irish Novehst, died, 1842. 

First Atlantic Cable landed, 1858. 

Transfiguration of our Lord. 

Leonidas, Spartan Hero, slain, 480, B. C. 

Fr. Hutcheson, Moral Phil., born, 1694. 



32) 11th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length, 13h. 30m. 



9 


Sunday, 


5 15 


6 45 


9 46 


Isaac Walton, born, 1593. 


10 


Monday, 


5 16 


6 44 


10 6 


Battle of Weisenburg, 1870. 


11 


Tuesday, 


5 17 


6 43 


10 36 


Viscount Kowland Hill, born, 1772. 


12 


Wednesday, 


5 18 


6 42 


11 5 


Pope Gregory IX, died, 1241. 


13 


Thursday, 


5 19 


6 41 


11 35 


Earthquake in Scotland, 1816. 


14 


Friday, 


5 19 


6 41 


morn 


G. Coleman, the elder. Dramatist, died, 1794. 


15 


Saturday, 


5 20 


6 40 


12 27 


Ascension of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 



33) 12th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 7. 



Day's length, 13h. 18m. 



16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 



Sunday, 


5 21 


6 39 


1 51 


Monday, 


5 22 


6 38 


2 51 


Tuesday, 


5 23 


6 37 


3 59 


Wednesday, 


5 24 


6 36 


rises 


Thursday, 


5 25 


6 35 


7 43 


Friday, 


5 26 


6 34 


8 20 


Saturday, 


5 27 


6 33 


8 50 



Battle of Bennington, 1777. 

Frederick the Great, died, 1786. 

John, Earl Kussell, born, 1792. 

Battle of Gravelotte, 1870. 

Robert Herrick, English Poet, born, 1591. 

Lady Mary Wortley Montague, died, 1762. 

Dr. F. J. Gall, founder of phrenology, died, 1828. 



34) 13th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 10. 



Day's length, 13h. 4m. 



23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 28 


6 32 


9 20 


5 29 


6 31 


9 50 


5 30 


6 30 


10 19 


5 31 


6 29 


10 58 


5 32 


6 28 


11 46 


5 33 


6 27 


morn 


5 34 


6 26 


12 42 



Wallace, beheaded, 1305. 

Dog days end. 

25th or 27th, Landing of Caesar in England, 55 B. C. 

Sir Rob.Walpole, born, 1676. 

Battle of Long Island, 1776. 

Leigh Hunt, died, 1859. 

John Locke, Philosopher, born, 1632. 



35) 14th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 17. 



Day's length, 12h. 50m. 



30 
31 



Sunday, 

Monday, 




Union defeat at Eichmond, Ky. 
John Bunyan, died, 1683. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— August 5,, Kosh Chodesh Ab ; 13., Tisho beab. 



14 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMAI^AC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



9th Month. 



SEPTEMBER. 



30 Days. 



CalcTzlated for tlie Latitu.de of tlie Soiatliern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon . . . 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon . . . . 
Last Quarter . , 



3d. 


2h. 


56m. 


Morning. 


lid. 


5h. 


47m. 


Morning. 


17d. 


llh. 


43m. 


Evening. 


24d. 


5h. 


47m. 


Evening. 





DAY 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 




OF 


rises 


sets 


r. & 8. 


CHKONOLOGY OF IMPOETANT EVENTS. 


Montli and Week. 


li. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 


Tuesday, 


5 37 


6 23 


3 23 


Napoleon m. captured at Sedan, 1870. 


2 


Wednesday, 


5 38 


6 22 


4 2 


Great fire in London, 1666. 


3 


Thursday, 


5 39 


6 21 


sets 


Cromwell died, 1658. 


4 


Friday, 


5 40 


6 20 


7 23 


Pindar, LjTric poet, 518, B. C. 


5 


Satui-day, 


5 42 


6 18 


7 46 


Confederates entered Mar^iand, 1862. 



36) 15th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 



Day's length, 12h. 34m. 



6 


Sunday, 


5 43 


6 17 


8 14 


Geo, Alex. Stevens, ^Triter, died, 1784. 


7 


Monday, 


5 44 


6 16 


8 44 


Independence of Brazil, 1822. 


8 


Tuesday, 


5 45 


6 15 


9 16 


Nativity of the Blessed Virgin. 


9 


"Wednesday, 


5 46 


6 14 


9 46 


James IV, of Scotland, kiUed, 1513. 


^10 


Thursday, 


5 47 


6 13 


10 17 


Mungo Park, African Traveler, born, 1771. 


11 


Friday, 


5 48 


6 12 


10 57 


James Thomson, poet, born, 1700. 


12 


Saturday 


5 49 


6 11 


11 56 


St. Guy, Confessor, 11th century. 



37) 16th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 7. 



Day's length, 12h. 20m. 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 50 


6 10 


morn 


5 51 


6 9 


12 58 


5 52 


6 8 


1 59 


5 53 


6 7 


3 9 


5 54 


6 6 


4 27 


5 55 


6 5 


rises 


5 56 


6 4 


7 19 



Sii' Wm. Cecil, Lord Burleigh, born, 1520. 

Uprising of the People of New Orleans against tlie usnrping gOTerment. 

Capture Harper's Feny by S'ewall Jackson 1862. 

Gabriel Dan'l Fahrenheit, died, 1736. 

Battle of Antietam, 1862. 

Gilbert Bishop Burnet, historian, born, 1643. 

First battle of Paris, 1870. 



38) 17th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, 12h. 6m. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



Sufiiday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 57 


6 3 


7 48 


5 58 


6 2 


8 23 


5 59 


6 1 


8 53 


6 


6 


9 45 


6 1 


5 59 


10 40 


6 3 


5 57 


11 26 


6 4 


5 56 


morn 



Alexander the Great, born, 356, B. C. 

St. Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist. 

Beginning of Autumn. 

Wm. Fpcott, Manusc. CoUec, died, 1845. 

Pepin, King of France, 768. 

Pacific Ocean discovered, 1513. 

Saints Cjnprian and Justina. , Mart^TS, 304, 



39) 18th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, llh. 50m. 



27 
28 
29 
30 



Sunday, 


6 


5 


5 55 


2 38 


Monday, 


6 


6 


5 54 


1 36 


Tuesday, 


6 


7 


5 53 


2 34 


AVednesday, 


6 


8 


5 52 


3 32 



Strassburg feU, 1870. 

Sii- Wm. Jones, Oriental Scholar, born, 1746. 

Michaelmas Day. 

Yorkto-s^-n invested, 1781. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5651.— September 3. and 4., Kosh Chodesh Elul. 









FOB THE SOUTHERN STATES. 




15 


10th 


M 


onth 


OCTOBER 


31 


Days. 






Calciilated for the Latitude of tlie Soiatliern States. 







MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 2d. 71i. 37m. Evening. 

First Quarter lOd. 5h. 36m. Evening. 

Full Moon 17d. 8h. 25m. Morning. 

Last Quarter ' 24d. 8h. 36m. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Sun 

rises 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. &s. 

li. m. 

1 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 
2 
3 


Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 


6 9 
6 10 
6 11 


5 51 

5 50 

5 49 


4 51 

sets 
6 40 


Fulton's first Steamboat trip, 1807. 
Andre' executed as a spy, 1780. 
Black Hawk, died, 1838. 



40) 19th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 9, 



Day's length, llh. 38m. 



4 


Sunday, 


6 12 


5 48 


7 3 


Battle of Germantown, 1777. 


5 


Monday, 


6 14 


5 46 


7 27 


Horace Walpole, born, 1717. 


6 


Tuesday, 


6 15 


5 45 


7 59 


Jenny Lind, born, 1820. 


7 


Wednesday, 


6 16 


5 44 


8 33 


Margaret, Maid of Norway, died, 1290. 


8 


Thursday, 


6 17 


5 43 


9 16 


Battle of Perryville, Ky., 1862. 


9 


Friday, 


6 18 


5 42 


10 15 


Great fire in Chicago, 1871. 


10 


Saturday, 


6 19 


5 41 


11 15 


Benjamin West, Painter, born, 1738. 



41) 20th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, llh. 20m. 



11 


Sunday, 


6 20 


5 40 


morn 


America discovered, 1492. 


12 


Monday, 


6 21 


5 39 


12 50 


St. Wilfrid, Bishop of York, 709. 


13 


Tuesday, 


6 23 


5 37 


1 49 


Battle of Queenstown, 1812. 


14 


Wednesday, 


6 24 


5 36 


2 37 


Battle of Jena, 1806. 


15 


Thursday, 


6 25 


5 35 


3 19 


Virgil, Latin Poet, born, 70 B. C. 


16 


Friday, 


6 26 


5 34 


4 20 


Marie Antoinette, beheaded, 1793. 


17 


Saturday, 


6 27 


5 33 


rises 


Burgoyne, surrendered, 1777. 



42) 21st Sunday after Trinity. 



John 4. 



Day's length, llh. 4m. 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Sunday, 


6 28 


5 32 


6 16 


Monday, 


6 29 


5 31 


6 55 


Tuesday, 


6 30 


5 30 


7 33 


Wednesday, 


6 31 


5 29 


8 31 


Thursday, 


6 32 


5 28 


9 29 


Friday, 


6 33 


5 27 


10 26 


Saturday, 


6 34 


5 26 


1 24 



Last State Lottery drawn in Engl. 1826. 

Cornwallis surrendered, 1781. 

M. Dahl, Swed. Portrait Painter, died, 1743. 

Battle of Trafalgar, 1805. 

Charles Martel, died, 741. 

Dr. John Jortin, Critic, born, 1698. 

Daniel Webster, died, 1852. 



43) 22d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 18. 



Day's length, lOh. 50m' 



25 


Sunday, 


6 35 


5 25 


morn 


Dr. James Beattie, Poet, born, 1735. 


26 


Monday, 


6 36 


5 24 


12 18 


Hogarth, died, 1765. 


27 


Tuesday, 


6 37 


5 23 


1 26 


Cuba discovered, 1492. 


28 


Wednesday, 


6 38 


5 22 


2 33 


Battle at White Plains, 1776. 


29 


Thursday, 


6 39 


5 21 


3 38 


Surrender of Metz, 1870. 


30 


Friday, 


6 40 


5 20 


4 38 


Solomon's Temple dedicated, 1004 B. C. 


31 


Saturday, 


6 41 


5 19 


5 39 


All Hallow Eve. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— October 3. and 4., Eosh Hashonah, 5652 : 
12., Yom Kippur ; 17. and 18., First days Suckoth. 



16 



EICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



11th Month. 



NOVEMBER. 



30 Days. 



Calculated, for ttie Latitiade of the Soiatherrx States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon Id. 

First Quarter 9d. 

Full Moon 15d. 

Last Quarter 23d. 



Ih. 12m. Afternoon. 

3h. 26m. Morning. 

6h. 56m. Evening. 

3h. om. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Pises 


sets 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


li. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



44) 23d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, lOh. 36m. 



Sunday, 


6 42 


5 17 


sets 


Monday, 


6 43 


5 16 


6 11 


Tuesday, 


6 44 


5 15 


6 46 


"Wednesday, 


6 45 


5 15 


7 33 


Thursday, 


6 45 


5 14 


8 22 


Friday, 


6 46 


5 13 


9 18 


Saturday, 


6 47 


5 18 


10 14 



All Saints Day. 

All Souls Day. 

Malacliy, Archbishoj) of Armagh, 1148. 

George Peabody, died, 1869. 

The American 74 launched, 1782. 

Battle of Port Koyal, 1861. 

John Kyrle, "The man of Eoss," died, 1724. 



45) 24th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 9. 



Day's length, lOh. 24m. 



8 


Sunday, 


6 48 


5 12 


11 25 


Cortez entered Mexico, 1519. 


9 


Monday, 


6 49 


5 11 


morn 


Great fire in Boston, 1872. 


10 


Tuesday, 


6 50 


5 10 


12 21 


Mahomet, Arabian Prophet, born, 570. 


11 


Wednesday, 


6 51 


5 9 


1 14 


Martinmas. 


12 


Thursday, 


6 52 


5 8 


2 26 


Sherman left Atlanta, 1864. 


13 


Friday, 


6 53 


5 7 


3 31 


French entered Vienna, 1805. 


14 


Saturday, 


6 54 


5 6 


4 39 


Sir Chas. Lyell, Geologist, born, 1797. 



46) 25th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 24. 



Day's length, lOh. 12m. 



15 


Sunday, 


16 


Monday, 


17 


Tuesday, 


18 


Wednesday, 


19 


Thursday, 


20 


Friday, 


21 


Saturday, 



6 54 


5 6 


rises 


6 55 


5 5 


5 40 


6 56 


5 4 


6 19 


6 57 


5 3 


7 20 


6 57 


5 3 


8 17 


6 58 


5 2 


9 12 


6 59 


5 1 


10 16 



John Keppler, great Astronomer, died, 1630. 

Tiberius, Eoman Emperor, born, 42 B. C. 

Suez Canal opened 1869. 

Fort Lee taken by the British, 1776, 

St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Widow, 1231. 

Thomas Chatterton, Poet, born, 1752. 

Presentation of the Blessed Virgin. 



47) 


26th Sunday after Trinity. 


Matth. 25. Day's length, lOh. 


Om. 


22 


Sunday, 


7 


5 


11 22 


Professor Dugald Stewart, born, 1753. 




23 


Monday, 


7 1 


4 59 


morn 


Th. Henderson, Prof, of Astronomy, died, 1844 


24 


Tuesday, 


7 1 


4 59 


12 2 


Battle of Lookout Mountain, 1863. 




25 


Wednesday, 


7 2 


4 58 


1 3 


Evacuation of New York, 1783. 




26 


Thursday, 


7 2 


4 58 


2 4 


John Elwes, noted Miser, died, 1789. 




27 


Friday, 


7 3 


4 57 


3 7 


Steam Printi^g, 1814. 




28 


Saturday, 


7 3 


4 57 


4 12 


Washington Lying, died, 1859. 





48) 


1st Sunday 


in Advent. 




Matth. 21. Day's length, 9h. 54m. 


29 
30 


Sunday, 

Monday, 


7 3 

7 4 


4 57 
4 56 


5 18 

6 28 


Sir Philip Sidney, Poet, born, 1554. 

U. S. took possession of Lomsiana, 1803. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5652.— November 1., Rosh Chodesh Cheshwan. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



17 



12th Month. 



DECEMBER 



31 Days. 



Calculated for tlie Latitiade of tine Soiathern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon Id. 6h. 25m. Morning. 

First Quarter 8d. llh. 53m. Afternoon. 

Full Moon 15d. 7h. 32ra. Morning. 

Last Quarter 23d. 12h. 18m. Morning. 

New Moon 30d. 9h. 59m. Evening. 



DAY 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 




OF 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


Month and Week. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 


Tuesday, 


7 5 


4 55 


sets 


Princess A. Gommena, Historian, born, 1083. 


2 


Wednesday, 


7 6 


4 54 


5 55 


Hernan Cortez, died, 1547. 


3 


Thursday, 


7 6 


4 54 


6 54 


Kobert Bloomlield, Poet, born, 1776. 


4 


Friday, 


7 7 


4 53 


7 43 


Pope John XXII, died, 1334. 


5 


Saturdaj', 


7 7 


4 53 


8 42 


Carlyle, born, 1795. 



49) 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke. 21. 



Day's length, 9h. 46m. 



t) 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Sunda.y, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Priday, 

Saturday, 



7 7 


4 53 


9 55 


7 8 


4 52 


10 59 


7 8 


4 52 


11 59 


7 8 


4 52 


morn 


7 9 


4 51 


12 59 


7 9 


4 51 


2 17 


7 9 


4 51 


3 33 



St. Nicholas, Archbishop of Myra, 342. 

Cicero, Boman orator, assassinated, 43 B. C, 

Immaculate Conception of Blessed Virgin. 

Milton, born, 1608. 

Louis Napoleon, elected President, 1848. 

Louis, Prince of Conde, died, 1686. 

St. Coiumba, Abbot in Ireland, 584. 



50) 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matth. 11. 



Day's length, 9h. 42m. 



8utiday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Priday, 

Saturday, 



7 9 


4 51 


4 36 


7 10 


4 50 


5 40 


7 10 


4 50 


rises 


7 10 


4 50 


6 2 


7 10 


4 50 


6 59 


7 11 


4 49 


7 58 


7 11 


4 49 


8 59 



Battle of Fredericksburg, 1862. 

Washington, died 1799. 

David Don, Botanist, died, 1841. 

Great Fire in New York, 1835. 

Ludw. Beethoven, emin. comp., born, 1770. 

St. Winebald, Abbot and Confessor, 760. 

Capt. W. Ed. Parry, Arct. Nav., born, 1790. 



51) 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length, 9h. 4m. 



20 


Sunday, 


7 11 


4 49 


10 2 


Secession ord. passed in. S. Carolina, 1860. 


21 


Monday, 


7 12 


4 48 


11 12 


St. Thomas, Apostle. 


22 


Tuesday, 


7 11 


4 49 


morn 


Emp. Vitellius, beheaded at Kome, 69, A D. 


23 


Wednesday, 


7 11 


4 49 


12 10 


Newton, born, 1642. 


24 


Thursday, 


7 11 


4 49 


12 49 


Treaty of Ghent, 1814. 


25 


Friday, 


7 11 


4 49 


2 


Nativity of our Lord. Christmas Day. 


26 


Saturday, 


7 10 


4 50 


3 6 


Battle of Trenton, 1776. 



52) Sunday after Christmas. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 50m. 



27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Suuday, 

Monday, 
Tuesday, 
Wednesday, 
Thursday, 



7 10 


4 50 


4 20 


7 10 


4 50 


5 33 


7 9 


4 51 


6 36 


7 9 


4 51 


sets 


7 9 


4 51 


6 10 



St. John, Apostle and Evangelist. 
Macauley, died, 1859. 
Union repulsed at Vicksburg, Miss, , 1862. 
Titus, Roman Emperor, born, 41 A D. 
Battle of Murfreesboro, 1862. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5652.— December 1. and 2., Rosh Chodesh Kisley ; 
6., Chanukah ; 31., Rosh Chodesh Tebet. 



18 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. 

The size depends upon the purposes for which it is intended; -whether the family is large or 
small, and the time which can be devoted to its cultivation. The most suitable soil for a garden 
is a Hght loam. TMien the soil is too heavy, it ought to be made hght by apphN-ing stable manure 
and working up the ground thoroughly. Trenching as done in Europe, or North, is not advis- 
able, at least where there is any cocoa, as by trenching the roots of this pest will get so deeply 
incorporated with the soil that trouble will be met with afterwards to get rid of it. Exposure 
towards the east is desirable. If there are one or more large trees in the garden, or on the 
immediate outside, their shade can be iised in which to sow Celery, Cabbage and other seeds 
during the hot summer months, which will be an advantage. The seed beds for this pui-pose 
should be so arranged as to receive only the morning or evening sun. It is of the gi-eatest 
importance that the ground should be well drained, otherwise it will be impossible to raise good 
vegetables. The most rehable manure for general purposes is well decomposed stable or barn- 
yard manure. Cow manure will suit best for light, sandy soil, and horse manure for heavy, stiff 
clay lands. For special purposes, Peruvian Guano, Commercial Fei-tilizer, Eaw Bone, Cotton 
Seed Meal and other commercial manui-es may be employed with advantage. Of late years most 
gardeners who work their land ^^ith a plow, use Cow peas as a fertilizer with excellent result. 
They are sown broad-cast at the rate of Is bushels to the acre, and when large enough they are 
turned under. "Where the land is very sandy, cotton seed meal has the most lasting effect. For 
quick growing crops, such as Melons, Cucumbers, etc., the Commercial Fertihzer and Guano ap- 
plied in the hills are very good. Soap suds are good for Celery; it is astonishing to jjerceive the 
difference in the size of those stalks which are watered every few days with the suds, and others 
on the same ground which are not. Wood ashes are best for Peas, either used as a top dressing 
when the Peas just come out of the ground, or else spiinkled in the rows when planted. The 
New Orleans market gardeners raise as fine vegetables as can be produced anywhere ; in fact, some 
varieties cannot be excelled, and veiy few gardeners use anything but stable manure. 

RotRtiOBi of Crops is another important item. Beets, CaiTOts and other roots should 
not be grown in succession on the same gi-ound, but should be changed to those which grow 
above ground, such as Lettuce, Beans, Peas, etc. Good seed, good ground and good cultivation 
are essential in order to raise good vegetables. "\Mien plants are up, the ground should be stii-red 
frequently; weeds ought not to be suffered to go into seed, but should be destroyed as soon as 
they appear. Hoeing and working the young crops duiing dry weather is very beneficial because 
the weeds are then easily killed, and hoeing the ground t\-i11 make it retain moisture better than 
if it were left alone. 







THE HOT BED 



Owing to the open -^inters in the South, hot beds are not so much used as in the North, ex- 
cept to raise such tender plants as Egg-Plants, Tomatoes and Peppers. There is little forcing of 
vegetables done here, except as regards Cucumbers and Lettuce; and, if we do not have any hard 
frosts, the latter does better in the open ground than under glass. To make a hot bed is a very 
simple thing. Any one who has the use of tools can make the wooden frame; the sashes may be 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 19 



obtained from any sash factory. I consider a wooden frame from five to six feet wide and ten 
feet six inches long a very good size. It should be at least six inches higher at the back than in 
the front, and covered by three sashes 3hx5 feet. The manure ought not to be over one morith 
old; it shoidd be thrown together in a heap, and when commencing to heat, be worked over with 
a fork, and the long and short manure evenly mixed. In this State the ground is generally low, 
and to retain the heat of the manure for a longer time it is best to put the manure on top of the 
ground— that is, make a bank two feet longer and two feet wider than the frame. Keep the 
edges straight and the corners firm; when thrown up about eighteen inches trample the manure 
doW to six or eight inches, then put on another layer of eighteen inches and trample down 
again; place thereon the frame and sash, and fill in six inches of good earth. After about five 
days stir the ground to kill the weeds which may have come up, then sow the seeds. In lower 
Louisiana the ground is too wet to dig out eighteen inches deep, throw in the manure and 
trample down as recommended in the North; by a few hard rains, such as we frequently have in 
winter, the manure would become so soaked beneath the ground that the heat would be gone. 
Another advantage, when the fi-ame is put above the ground, is, that it will go dov/n with the 
manure gi-adiially, and there remains always the same space between the glass and the gTound. 
If the gi-ound is dug out and the manure put into the frame, the ground will sink down so low, 
after a short time, that the sun will have httle effect upon it^ and plants will become spindly. 



SOWING SEEDS. 

Some seeds are so"^ti at once where they are to remain and mature. Others are sown in 
seed beds and transplanted afterwards. Seeds should be covered according to theu" sizes, a 
coveiing of earth twice the size of the seed is about the maximum. Some seeds, such as Beans, 
Corn and Peas, can be covered from one to two inches, and they -svill come up well. Here is a 
difference again: Wrinkled Peas and Sugar Corn have to be covered lighter and more carefully 
than Marrowfat Peas or the common varieties of Corn. It depends upon the nature of the soil, 
season of the year, etc. For instance, in heavy wet soils seeds have to be covered hghter than 
in sandy Ught gTound. Seeds which are sown duiing summer in the open ground, such as Beets 
and Carrots, should be soaked over night in water and rolled in ashes or plaster before sowing; 
they ^vill come up quicker. When they are sown in a seed bed, the ground should be light 
enough not to bake after a rain. Some varieties of seeds reqmre shade when so^oi during the 
summer, such as Cauhflower, Celery and Lettuce. Care should be taken to have the shade at 
least three feet from the ground, and shade only after the sun has been on the bed for two or 
three hours; and remove again early in the afternoon, so the plants may become sturdy. If too 
much shaded they vnR be drawn up, long-legged, and not fit to be set out in the open ground. 
The most successful cabbage planters in this neighborhood sow their seeds in the open ground, 
towards the end of July and during August, and give them no shade but water, and keep the 
gi-ound moist from the day of sowing till the plants are transplanted. Seeds should be sown 
thinly in the seed bed. If plants come up too thickly they are apt to damp off. 

Lettuce seed should be sprouted during the hot months before sowing, according to direc- 
tions given for June. 

To sow Turnips on a large scale during late summer and early fall months, the gTOund 
should be jorepared in advance, and the seed sown just before or during a rain. Small pieces of 
ground, of course, can be sown at any time and watered afterwards. For covering all kinds of 
seeds, a fork is preferable to a rake; with either implement, care must be taken not to cover the 
seeds too deep. Beans, Peas and Corn are covered Avith the hoe. Some fine seeds, such as 
Thyme or Tobacco, are covered enough when pressed mth the back of the spade to the ground. 
The seedsman is often blamed for selhng seeds which have not come up, when the same are 
perfectly good; but, perhaps, through ignorance the party by whom they were sown, placed them 
too deep or too shallow in the ground, or the gTound may have been just moist enough to swell 
the seeds, and they failed to come up. At other times washing rains after sowing beat the 
ground and form a crust that the seeds are not able to penetrate, or, if there is too much fresh 
manure in the ground, it will burn the seeds, and destroy its vitahty. 

When seeds, such as Beans, Cucumbers, Melons and Squash, are planted before it is warm 
enough, they are very apt to rot if it rains. 



20 



EICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Seeds requisite to produce a given number of Plants and sow a given 

amount of ground. 



Quantity 
per acre. 

Artichoke, 1 oz. to 500 plants 3^ lb. 

Asparagus, 1 oz. to 200 plants 5 lbs. 

Barley 2]4hn. 

Beans, dwarf, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill. . . iW " 

Beans, pole, 1 quart to 200 hills 3^ " 

Beet, garden, 1 oz. to 100 feet of drill 10 lbs. 

Beet, Mangel, L oz. to 150 feet of drill. 6 " 

Broccoli, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 

Broom Corn 10 lbs. 

Brussels Sprouts, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants. 5 oz. 

Buckwheat... 3^bu. 

*Cabbage, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 



Carrot, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 

^Cauliflower, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 

*Celery, 1 oz. to 10,000 plants 

Clover, Alsike and White Dutch 

" Lucerne, Large Red & Crimson 
Trefoil 

" Medium 

*Collards, 1 oz. to 2,500 plants 

Corn, sweet, 1 quart to 500 hills . . 

Cress, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill 

Cucumber, 1 oz. to 80 hills 

Egg Plant, I oz. to 2,000 plants . ... 

Endive, 1 oz. to 300 feet of drill 

Flax, broadcast. .. . 



21^ lbs 

5 oz. 
4 " 

6 lbs. 



8 lbs. 
10 lbs. 
6 oz. 
8 qts. 
8 lbs. 
1^" 
3 oz. 
3 lbs. 
Mbu. 



Gourd, 1 oz. to 25 hills 23^^ lbs 



Grass, Blue Kentucky. 

Blue English 

Hungarian and Millet. 

Mixed Lawn. 

Orchard, Perennial Rye, Red Top, 
Fowl Meadow and Wood Meadow . 



bu. 



Quantity 
per acre. 

Garlic, bulbs, 1 lb. tt) 10 feet of drill 

Hemp.. .. 3^bu. 

Kale, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 4 oz. 

Kohl-Rabi, 1 oz. to 200 feet of drill 13^1bs. 

Leek, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill . . 4 " 

Lettuce, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 3 " 

Melon, Musk, 1 oz. to 100 hills l^ '• 

Melon, Water, i oz. to 25 hills 1]4 " 

iSflasturtium. 1 oz. to 50 feet of drill .10 " 

Oats ... 21^ bu. 

Okra, 1 oz. to 50 feet of drill .. .10 lbs. 

Onion Seed, 1 oz to 200 feet of drill .... 4 " 

" for Sets . 30 '■ 

Onion Sets, 1 quart to 20 feet of drill 8 bu. 

Parsnip, i oz. to 250 feet of drill 5 lbs. 

Parsley, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 8 " 

Peas, garden, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill. . . IJ^bu. 

" field 2}4 " 

Pepper, 1 oz. to 1,500 plants 4 oz. 

~ 10 bu. 

4 qts. 

8 lbs. 



Potatoes. 

Pumpkin, 1 quart to 300 hills 

Radish, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill 

Rve ... 

Salsify, 1 oz. to 60 feet of drill 

Spinach, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill 

Summer Savory, 1 oz. to 500 feet of drill.. 2 

Squash, summer, 1 oz. to 40 hills 2 

" winter, 1 oz. to 10 hills 3 

Tomato, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants. 
Tobacco, 1 oz. to 5,000 plants 
Turnip, loz. to 250 feet of drill .... .... IJ^ lbs. 

Vetches. 2 bu. 

Wheat lto2 " 

* The above calculations are made for sowing in the spring; during the summer it requires 
double the quantity to give the same amount of plants. 



]3^bu. 
8 lbs. 
10 " 



3 oz. 



Number of Plants or Trees to the Acre at given' distances. 



Dis. apart. No. 
3^ foot 

13^ feet '.'.'.....'.'. 



2M " 

3 feet by 1 foot.. 
3 " 2 feet.. 



Plants. 
.174,240 
. 43,560 
. 19,360 
. 10,890 
. 6,96) 
. ] 4,5:0 I 5 
. 7,260 I 



Dis. apart. No. Plants. 



3 feet by 3 feet 



1 foot. . . 

2 feet. 



4,840 
10,888 
5,444 
3,629 
2,722 
1,742 



Dis. apart. No. Plants. 
6 feet. 1,210 



8 " 680 

9 " 573 

10 " 435 

11 " 360 



Dis. apart. 
12 feet. . . 


No. Plants. 
302 


15 " 


193 


18 " . . 


. 134 


20 " 


108 


25 " 


69 


30 " 


49 



Standard Weight of Various Articles. 



Apples 

dried. 

Barley 

Beans 

Buckwheat 

Broom Corn 

Blue Grass, Kentucky 

" " English 

Bran 

Canary Seed 

Castor Beans 

Clover Seed 

Corn, shelled . . . 

on ear 

Corn Meal 

Charcoal. 

Coal, Mineral 

Cranberries .. 

Dried Peaches 

Flax Seed ... 

Hemp Seed 

Hungarian Grass Seed ... 

Irish Potatoes, heaping measure, 

Millet 

Malt 

Oats 

Osage Orange 

Orchard Grass 



per bush. 



48 lbs. 
22 " 
48 " 


Onions 

Peas 

Plastering Hair 


per 


bush. 54 lbs 
60 " 
8 '• 


60 " 
48 " 


Rape 

Rye 




50 " 
" 56 " 


46 " 


Red Top Seed 




" 14 " 


14 " 






50 " 


24 '• 
20 " 


Salt, Michigan 

Sweet Potatoes 




56 " 
" 56 " 


60 " 
46 " 


Timothy Seed 

Turnips . . . . .... 




45 " 
" 58 " 


60 " 


Wheat 




60 " 


56 " 


Beef and Pork, per bbl 


., net 


200 " 






196 " 


50 " 
22 " 


White Fish and Trout, 

Salt, per bbl 

Lime, " 

Hay, well settled, per 
Corn, on cob, in bin 

" shelled " 
Wheat, 
Oats, 
Potatoes, 
Sand, dry, 
Clay, compact. 
Marble, 

Seasoned Beech Wood 
Hickory, 


per bbl., net.. 


.... 200 " 
280 '' 


80 " 
40 " 
28 " 
56 " 
44 " 
48 " 


3ubic foot. ... 


. ... 220 " 

.... 22 " 
.... 45 " 
... 48 " 
. ... 253^" 


60 " 


11 


. . . . 383^" 


50 " 
38 " 
3> " 


:: •'"" 


.... 95 " 

.... 135 " 
169 " 


33 " 


per cord 


5 616 " 


14 " 




.. 6,960 " 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



21 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF VEGETABLE SEED. 



ARTICHOKE. 

Aktichaut (Fr.), Aktischoke (Ger.), Alcachofa (Sp.). 

L<arg:e Oreesi CrSobe. This 
is a very popular vegetable in the 
South, and much esteemed hj the 
native as well as the foreign popula- 
tion from the South of Europe. It is 
extensively cultivated for the New 
Orleans market. It is best propagated 
from suckers which come up around 
the large plants. Take them off 
during the fall and early winter 
months; plant them four feet apart 
each way. Every fall the ground 
should be manured and spaded or 
plowed between them; at the same 
time the suckers should be taken off. 
If planted by seed, sow them in drills 
during winter or early spring, three 
inches apart and one foot from row 
to row; cover with about one-half inch 
of earth. The following fall the 
plants can be transplanted and culti- 
vated as recommended above. The 
seeds I offer are imported by me from 
Italy, and of superior quality; I can 
also furnish sprouts or plants in the 
fall of the year, at $1.50 per 100. 




Green Globe Artichoke. 



for our 



The Early Campania I have dropped from the list; it is not hardy enou^ 
section. Dies out during Summer when we have hard rains. 

ASPARAGUS. 

AsPERGE (Fr.), Spaegel (Ger.), Espaeagos (Sp.) 

Conover's Co^lossal. The Asparagus is not extensively cultivated in the South; not 
that it is not liked well' enough, but from the fact that it does not succeed as well as in more 
Northern latitudes. It seems that it is short-lived, the roots giving out soon or throwing up 
very small shoots. 

The ground should be well manured and prepared before either the roots or seeds are 
planted. For this climate the sowing of seed is preferable. Koots are generally imported from 
the North, and I have found that the roots raised here, one year old, are as strong as those 
received from the North, three years old. Plant the seed in early spring. Soak over night in 
water; plant in rows, or rather hills, one foot apart and two feet between; put from four to five 
seeds in each hill; when well up thin out to two plants. The following winter, when the stalks 
are cut off, cover with a heavy coat of well rotted manure and a sprinkling of salt; fishbrine will 
answer the same purpose. In the spring fork in the manure between the rows, and keep clean 
of weeds. The same treatment should be repeated every year. The bed should not be cut before 
being three years estabUshed. Care must be taken not to cut the stalks too soon in the fall of 
the year — not until we have had a frost. If cut before, it will cause the roots to throw up young 
shoots, which will weaken them. 

BUSH BEAMS. 

CULTUKE. 

Place in rows eighteen inches apart; drop a bean every two or three inches. Plant from end 
of February, and for succession, every two or three weeks to May. Bush Beans planted in this 
latitude during June and July, will not produce much. August and September are good months 
in which to plant again; they will produce abundantly till killed by the frost. Do not cover the 
seeds more than two inches. 

POLE BEANS. 

Lima Beans should not be planted before the ground has become warm in spring. Strong 
poles ought to be set in the ground from four to six feet apart, and the ground drawn around 
them before the seed is planted. It is always best to plant after a rain and with the eye of the 
bean down. The other varieties can be planted flat, and not more than three to four feet apart, 
and hilled after they are up. Do not cover the seeds more than two inches; one inch is enough 
for the Southern ProUfic and Crease Back, 



•22 



EICHARD FROTSCHEE's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



BEANS. 

PWAEF, SNAP or BUSH.) 
Haeicot (Fr.), Bokne (Ger.), FRUOLENA^'o (Sp.) 



Pride of Xeidon. 

Early Valentine Red lipeckled. 

Early Jlohaick Six Weeks. 

Early Yellow Six Weeks. 

Geinnan Dwarf Wax. 

White Eidneij. 

Early China Eed~Eye. 

Pride of Newton. Of recent introcluc- 
tion. This is a robust, strong gro-wing bean 
viith. long flat pods, Vmcli are light green. It 
"is quite early and very productive. The bean 
is similar to the Yellow Six Weeks in color, 
but mnch hardier. 

Early Valentine, one of the best 
varieties; pods round, tender and qrdte pro- 
ductive; not much planted for the market. 
Excellent for shipping. 

Early Moliawk Six IVeeks. This 
is a long podded variety, and very hardy. It 



Bed Kidney. 
Dwarf Golden Wax. 
BeM of All. 
Bnproved Valerdin.e. 
WardwelVs Dwarf Kidney Wax. 
Henderson's Xew Dwarf Lima. 



is used to a large extent for the market for the 
first planting; very productive. 

Early Yellovr Six IFeeks. This is 
the most popular sort among market gardeners. 
Pods flat and long; a very good bearer, but 
not so good for shipping as the Mohawk or 
Yalentine. 

Oeroian D^varf Wax. A good va- 
riety which is unsurpassed as a snap bean. 
Pods are of a wax color and have no strings; 
quite productive. Has come into general cul- 
tivation; cannot be too highly recommended. 





P^^^ 



if 





Pri;le 01 Xev.-tou Bca.u. 



Dwarf Golden Wax Bean. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



23; 



llVhite Kidney. A good strong grow- 
ing variety, not much planted. 

Early China Red-Eye. Early and 
of good quality, but not very popular. 

Red Kidney. This kind is largely 
planted for the New Orleans market. It is a 
coarse growing variety, and much used for 
shelling when the pods turn yellow, so that 
the beans are well developed, but yet soft. 

Dwarf Oolden l»l^ax. A dwarf va- 
riety with fiat pods, longer than the Dwarf 
German Wax; entirely stringiess and white, 
mottled with purplish red. This variety will 
come into general cultivation, and will in time 
take the place of the black seeded Wax, being 
earlier and more productive. 

Best of All. A variety from Germany of 
great merit, introduced here by me. It is 
green podded, long and succulent; it is prolific 
and well flavored. An excellent variety for 
shipping and family use. It is not quite so 
early as the Mohawk, but is of superior quality 
for shipping, and, therefore, is almost the onlj^ 
kind planted here for that purpose. The cut 
is a good representation as it grows; it shows 
only two-thirds of its natural size. Can not 
be too highly recommended. I expect to have 
a full supply this year. 

Improved Valentine. This variety 
has all the good qualities of the old Valentine; 
only, it is ten days earlier, a great consideration 
when planted for the market; it mil supersede 
the old variety of Valentine. 

lVard\^^ell 's Dwarf Kidney 
Wax. This kind was introduced three years 
ago. It is the best dwarf Wax Bean in culti- 
vation; it is quite early; the pods are of similar 
shape as the Golden Wax, but longer; color of 
a beautiful golden yellow. They are very 
prolific and hardy, surpassing any other Dwarf 
Wax Bean that I know of. The color of the 
bean is somewhat like the Golden Wax, but 
more kidney-shaped and more spotted with 
dark purple. It has done best here among 
the Dwarf Wax Beans. Of all the many new 
kinds I have tried, I found none to excel it. 

Dwrarf Flag-eolet "Wax. A German 
variety which figures as Perfection Wax, also 




Best of All Beans 




24 



EICHAED FEOTSCHER'S ALMANA.C AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Scarlet Flageolet Wax in some catalogues. It is 
a robust growing sort "witii large fine yellow 
pods. This is the second year that I put it 
upon my list, but I have had it in stock since 
four years, and have tried to introduce it 
amongst the gardeners who still give the Ward- 
xceWs Kidney the preference. 



Henderson's New Bush L.iina 
Beans. This is a dwarf Butter Bean which 
requires no poles, it grows from 18 to 24 inches 
high. It is early and productive. It should 
be called Dicaii Carolina or Seicee Beans, as the 
pods are of the size of that variety. Eecom- 
mend same for family use, or where it is diffi- 
cult to obtain poles. 





m:'W 




ImDroved Valentine. 



Henderson's Dwarf Lima. 



BEANS. 

POLE OR RUXXING. 

Habicots a Ra:mi:s (Ft.), Staxgen-Bohnen (Ger.), Frijol Yastago (Sp.). 

Large Lima. \ 

Carolina or Seicee. I 

Southern Willow-leaved Seicee or Butter. j 
Horticultural or Wren's Egg. 

Dutch Case Knife. j 
German Wax or Butter. 



Southern Prolific. 

Crease Back. 

Golden Wax Fla-geolet. 

Lazy Wife's. 

Early Golden Cluster Wax. 



'Larg'e Li ma. A well-known and ex- 
■cellent variety. It is the best shell bean 
kno^^■n. Should have rich groiind, and plenty 
room to grow. 

Carolina or Sewee. A variety similar 
to the Lima; the only diiference is, the seeds 
and pods are smaller. It is generally culti- 



vated, being more productive than the Large 
Lima. 

Southern TTillow-leaved Sewee 
or Butter. This is a variety which is grown 
by the market gardeners about New Orleans; 
the pods and beans are the same as the Sewee 
or Carolina Bean; it is quite distinct in the 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



25 



leaves, being narrow like the ^^dllow. It stands 
the heat better than any other Butter Bean, 
and is very productive. Try it. 

Horticultural or l¥ren's lEgy;* 

Does not grow very strong; bears well, pods 
about six inches long, which are roundish and 
very tender. 

Dutch Case Knife. A very good pole 
bean; it is early; pods broad and long; some- 
what turned towards the end. 

German Wax. This is a fine varietj^ 
and has the same good qualities as the German 
Dwarf Wax. Pods have a waxy appearance; 
very succulent and tender. 

Southern Prolilic. No variety will 
continue longer in bearing than this. It stands 
the heat of the summer better than any other, 
and is planted ta succeed the other kinds. li: 
is a \ery strong grower; pods about seven , 
inches long and fiat; seeds are dark yellow or 
rather light brown. It is the standard variety 
for the New Orleans market, for late spring 
and summer. 

Crease Back. A variety of Pole Beans 
which has been cultivated in the South for a 
long time, but has never come into the trade 
till introduced by me. It is an excellent bean, 
earlier than the "Southern Prolific." Seeds 
white; pods round, with a crease in the back, 
from which the name. It is a good grower. 




bears abundantly, and, if shipped, will keep 
better than most other kinds. It sells better 
in the spring than any other for shipping 
purpose; and when in season, it can not be 
surpassed. For early summer, the Southern 
Prolific is preferable, standing the heat better. 
Several years ago I received half a bushel from 
near Mobile, AJa., and all the beans of this 
variety in the whole country can be traced 
back to that half bushel. I supplied two 
growers in Georgia where it was not known 
that time. I expect to have a full supply this 
season. There is a light brown bean streaked 
and mottled with dark brown and black of the 
same name; but it is not equal to the white 




La^y Wile's Pole Beans. 



White Crease Back Pole Beans. 



26 



EICHAED FEOTSCflEE'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



variety. In some localities this kind is called ( 

"Calico Crease Back." The ^\-hite seeded j 
variety is also kno^^yn in some sections by the 

name of "Fat Horse." This is the original j 

stock; the quality is so fine that no improve- ! 
ment can be made on it. 

Golden Wax Flageolet. This va- 
riety ^as introduced four years ago; it ^vas 
brought out fi'om Germany. After another 
year's experience I can confirm all vrhp.t is 
claimed for it. It ig the best Wax Pole Bean 
in cultivation, surpasses in length and delicacy 
of flavor all other "Wax varieties. It is a very 
strong gro^-er, vhich is -^anting by most 
of the Wax Pole kinds. It bears abundantly, 
is entirely stringiess, and does not spot, even 
by too much rain or other untoward "vveather. 
Cannot be too highlv recommended. The 



Golden Wax Pole Bean, brought out three 
years ago, I have dropped, as it can stand no 
comparison with the Golden Wax Flageolet. 

Early Oolden Cluster lIFax Pole. 

This is the earhest Wax Pole Bean in cultiva- 
tion; pods from 6 to 8 inches long, produced 
in clusters. The pods are golden yellow; for 
shipping they are rather too wide. It has not 
the same fine appearance of the Flageolet. 
For family use it cannot be too highly recom- 
mended on account of its productiveness and 
dehcious flavor. 

Lazy \f^ife's. A Pole Bean from Penn- 
sylvania. The pods are entirely stringiess, 
4—5 inches long, and have a fine'^flavor when 
cooked. They retain their rich flavor until 
nearly lipe. The beans are white, and as fine 
as a shell bean. 




Goldea Cluster Wax Pole Bean. 



Golden Wax Flageolet Pole Beaus. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



27^ 



ENGLISH BEANS. 

Feve de Marais (Fr.), Puff-Bohnen, (Ger.), Haba Comun (Sp.). 



Broad IVioidsor. Not so much cul- 
tivated here as in some parts of Europe. It is 
much liked by the people of the Southern part 



of Europe. Ought to be planted during 
November; as, if planted in the spring, they 
will not produce much. 



Long Bed Mangel Wurzel. 
White French Sugar. 
Silver or Swiss Chard. 
Eclipse. 
Lentz. 



BEETS. 

Betrave (Fr.)) Runkeleuebe (Ger.), Remolacha (Sp.), 

Extra Early or Bassano. 

Simon's Eay-ly Bed Turnip. 

Early Blood Turnip. 

Long Blood. 

Half Long Blood. 

Egyptian Bed Turnip 

CULTURE. 
The ground for beets should be rich and well spaded or plowed. Sow in drills twelve to 
eighteen inches apart, cover the seed about one inch deep. When about a month old, thin them 
out to four or six inches apart. In this latitude beets are sown from January till the end of 
April, and from the middle of July till the middle of November; in fact, some market gardeners 
sow them every month in the year. In the summer and fall it is well to soak the seeds over 
night and roll in plaster before sowing. 



Extra EarBy, or Bassano, is the 

earliest variety, but not popular on accoiint of 
its color, which is almost white when boiled. 
Earliness is not of so much value here, where 
there are beets sown and brought to the market 
the whole year round. In the North it is 
different, where the first crop of beets in the 
market in spring will bring a better price than 
the varieties which mature later. 

SsmonN Early fSed Turaiip. 

This is earlier than the Blood Turnip, smooth 
.skin and of light red color; planted a good deal 
by the market gardeners about New Orleans. 

Early Blood Turnip. The most 
popular variety for market piirposes as well as 
family use. It is of a dark red color and very 
tender. This is the principal variety planted 
for shipping. My stock is raised for me from 
dark selected roots, and cannot be excelled. 

Lonir Blood. It is not quite so tender 
as the foregoing variety; it is not planted at all 
for the market, and very little for family use. 
In the North it is chiefly planted for winter 



use; here we have Turnip Beets the whole 
winter from the garden; therefore it has not 
the same value. 

Half liOEig Blood. A very dark red 
variety of a half long shape; a good kind for 
family use. 

Eg-yptian Ked Turnip. This is a 
variety sent out by "Benary" some years 
ago. It is very early, tender, deep red and of 
Turnip shape. Leaves of this variety are 
smaller than of others. The seeds are also 
much smaller. I recommend it and consider- 
it a good acquisition. The seed of this variety 
is obtained by me from the original source and 
is the finest stock offered; increases in popu- 
larity every year. 

Eclipse. A new Beet from Germany,, 
very regular, of globular shape. It has a small 
top, is of dark red blood color, sweet and fine 
grained flesh. It comes as early as the Egj'p- 
tian. 

Eongr Red Mang:el ^Wurzel. This. 
is raised for stock; it gi'ows to a large size. 




Simon's Early Rod T 



Early Blood Turnip Beet. 



28 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Here in the Soutli where stock is not stabled 
during the winter, the raising of root crops is 
much neglected. Being very profitable for its 
food it ought to be more cultivated. 




If hite Frencia Su§:ar, is used the 
same as the foregoing; not much planted. 

Silver JBeet, or S^iviss Cliard. 
This variety is cultivated for its large succulent 
leaves, which are used for the same purposes as 
Spinach. It is very popular in the New Orleans 
market. 

l^entZ. This new strain of Blood Turnip 
Beet originated with one of the most prominent 




Egyptian Hed Turnip Beet. 



White French Sugar Beet 







m-i 



Eclipse Beet. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



29 



market gardeners around Philadelphia. This 
beet, as selected and grown by him, has had a 
great reputation, in the surroundings of the 
above place, but the seed has been carefully 
guarded and kept until recently, when it fell 
into the hands of a seed grower, from whom I 
have received my supply. It is fully as early 



as the Egyptian Beet, but larger and of better 
quality; it has a fine turnip form with smooth 
roots, dark blood red flesh, tender and sweet 
at all times, never becoming tough and stringy, 
even when old. The cut is an exact represen- 
tation of its shape. 



BORECOLE, OE^ CURLED KALE. 

Chou-veet (Fr.), GeUnee Kohl (Ger.), Beeton (Sp.), 

I>i;varf German Oreeiis. A vegetable highly 
esteemed in the Northern part of Europe, but very little 
cultivated in this country. It requires frost to make it good 
for the table. Treated the same as cabbage. 

BROCCOLI. 

Chou Beocoli (Fr.), Spaegel-Kohl (Ger.), Beoculi (Sp.). 

Purple Cape. Eesembles the Cauliflower, but not 
forming such compact heads, and not quite so white, being 
of greenish cast. We raise such fine Cauliflower here that 
very little Broccoli is planted. 

The Purple Cape is the most desirable variety; cultivated 
the same as Half Early Cauliflower; further North than New 
Orleans, where Cauliflower does not succeed, the Broccoli 
may be substituted, being hardier. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Chou de Beuxelles (Fr.), Eosen oe Speossex Kohl (Ger.), 
Beeton db Beuselas (Sp.). 
A vegetable cultivated the same as the Cabbage, but very 
little known here. The small heads which appear along the 
upper part of the stalk between the leaves, make a fine dish 
when well prepared. Should be sown during August and 
September. 

CAEBACE. 




Brussels Sprout. 



Early York. 
Early Large York. 
Early Sugar Loaf. 
Early Large Oxheart. 
Early W inning stadt. 
Jersey Wakefield. 
Early Flat Dutch. 
Early Drumhead. 
Large Flat Brunswick. 



Chou Pomme (Fr.), Kopfkohl (Ger.), Kbpollo (Sp.). 

Lmproved Early Summer. 

Lnproved Large Late Drmnhead. 

Frotscher's Superior Late Flat Dutch. 

Bed Dutch (for pickling. ) 

Green Globe Savoy. 

Early Dwarf Sa.voy. 

Drumhead Savoy. 

St. Denis or Chou BonneuU. 



During the past "World's Exposition" I exhibited different vegetables as they were in season. 
Many visitors will recollect the fine specimens of Cabbage, Beets, Celery, Cauliflower, Lettuce, 
Cucumbers, etc., they saw there displayed. I received the Prize for **FrotSClaer's Wlilt 
Outch Catobag'e" and Early Blood Turnip Beets. Ten heads of Cabbage, devoid of all 
outside leaves, weighed one hundred and seventy-three pounds. They were raised on Captain 
Marcy's place, one mile below Algiers. — I did not exhibit them for competition, but merelj' to 
show to our Northern visitors what fine vegetables we have here during the winter, when at their 
homes everything is covered with snow and ice. The Committee of Awards on Vegetables gave 
me the Prize without any sohcitation on my part, — they thinking it well merited. (See inside 
cover.) 

CULTURE. 

Cabbage requires a strong, good soil, and should be heavily manured. To raise large Cab- 
bage without good soil and without working the plants well, is an impossibility. Cabbage is 
sown here almost in every month of the year, but the seed for a main crop should be sown from 
July to September. Some sow earlier, but July is time enough. For a succession, seed can be 
sown till November. The main crop for Spring should be sown from end of October to end of 
November, as stated before. The raising of Cabbage for spring has become quite an item of late 



30 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



years; Brunsvrick should be sown a little earlier tiian the Early Summer, — the latter kind not till 
November, but in a frame, so the young plants can be protected against cold weather, which we 
generally have between December a,nd January. After the middle of January setting out can be 
commenced with. These early varieties of Cabbage requu-e special fertilizing to have them large. 
Early varieties are sown during winter and early spiing. Cabbage is a very important crop, and 
one of the best paj-ing for the market gardener. It requires more work and attention than 
most people are willing to give, to raise cabbage plants during the months of July and August. 
I have found, by careful observation, that plants raised, in August are the surest to head here. 
The most successful gardeners in raising cabbage plants sow the seeds thinly in seed beds, and 
water several times during the day; in fact, the seed-bed is never allowed to get dr^^ £rom the 
sowing of the seed till large enough to transplant. There is no danger, in doing this, of scalding 
the plants, as many would supj)ose; but on the contrary, the plants thrive well, and so ti-eated, 
will be less liable to be attacked by the cabbage flies, as they are too often disturbed during the 




These three heads of Cabbage were grov.n by M. POPOVICH, at TcNiSBrKG, La. 





Early Winningstadt. 



St. Denis, or Chou Bonneuil. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



31 




Drumhead Savoy 



Large York. 





Green Globe Savoy. 



Earlv Flat Dutch. 




Improved Large Late Drumhead. 



Early Large Oxheart. 




Early York. 



Early Dwarf Savoy. 



32 



KICHAKD FEOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





Early Drumhead. 



Improved Farly Summer. 



day. Tobacco stems chopped up and scattered between the plants and in the walks between 
the beds, are a preventative against the fly. 



Early York. This is an early variety, 
but very little grown here except for family 
use. As we have cabbage heading up almost 
the whole year, it has not the same value as in 
Northern cHmates, where the first cabbage in 
spring brings a good price. 

Large York. About two to three weeks 
later than the above, forming hard heads; not 
grown for the market. Recommended for 
family use. 

Early Saig^ar Loaf. Another pointed 
variety, with spoon-shaped loaves; sown in 
early spring for an early summer cabbage. 

Early Lary:e ©xSseart. An excellent 
variety, which is later than the Liarge York, 
and well adapted for sowing in fall or early 
spring. 

Ear3y ^l^iaiBiiaigrslst^t* This is a 
very line solid-heading variety; pointed and of 
good size, of the same season as the Oxheart. 
It is very good for family use. It does not suit 
the market, as no pointed cabbage can be sold, 
to any advantage in the New Orleans market. 

Jersey 'Wak.eSelcS. Very popular in 
the North; but little planted here. It is of 
medium size and heads up well. 

EarBy FBat l>a.stcSa. An intermediate 
kind between the early pointed and late 
varieties. It is not, on an average, as heavy as 
the Oxheart or "Winningstadt; but, if raised for 
the market, more salable on account of being 
flat. Very good variety for family use. 

EarSy fi>rMEBB^2a';ad. A similar variety 
to the above; a little earlier, and not making as 
many leaves, it can be planted close. A good 
early spring cabbage. 

Larfje FSat EJrasEBS^viiife. This is a 
late German variety, introduced by me over 
tAventy years ago. It is an excellent variety, 
and when v\ell beaded up, the shape of it is a 
true type (-f a Pr-i'iiiium Fiat Dutch Cabbage. 
It recpiires very rich ground if sown for winter 
crop, and should be sovrn early, as it is a httle 
more susceptible of frost than the Superior 
Fiat Diitch. It is well adapted for shipping, 
being very hard, and does not wilt so quick as 



others. At Frenier, along the Jackson R. E, , 
this is the kind principally planted, and is pre- 
ferred over all other varieties. The people 
hving there plant nothing else but cabbage, 
and have tried nearly all highly recommended 
varieties, and this is their choice. At that 
place the seeds are sown in October and 
November. The bulk of the cabbage raised 
there is shipped North in April and May, and 
is the finest which comes to the Chicago 
market. 

Improved EarSy gsasiiimer. This 
cabbage is of recent introduction. It is not 
quite so large as the Brunswick; for fail it can 
be sown in August; for spring, in November 
and as late as January. It heads up very 
uniform and does not produce many outside 
leaves. It is hardier than the Brunswick, and 
stands the cold and heat better. The seed I 
offer is of the best strain cultivated, and can be 
planted closer together than the late varieties — 
say about 8000 to the acre. The finest crop of 
this variety (one hundred and fifty thousand 
heads of cabbage) I ever saw, was raised four 
years ago near the city. The gxower could 
commence on one end of the row to cut, and 
continue to the end, all well headed. The}" 
averaged about 7 pounds. 

I E&8 proved Larg:c Late Brsiiaa- 
Saead. Fine large variety; should be sown 
early in the fail for winter, or during December 
and January for late spring use; it will stand 
more cold weather than the Brunsvv'ick. 

Superior Late FSat ©iitcSi. 
This is the most popular variety for Avinter 
cabbage, and cultivated by almost every gar- 
dener who plants for the New Orleans market. 
My stock is of superior quahty, and I venture 
to say that seventy-five per cent, of all cabbage 
sold in the New Orleans market are of seeds 
Avhich have been obtained from my store. 
During winter and sprmg, specimens which 
are brought as samples to my establishment, 
weighing from fifteen to twenty-five pounds, 
can frequently be seen. In regard to the time 
of planting, see remarks under head of "Cab- 
bage" in the directions for planting for July. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



35 






Early Scarlet Horn Carrot. 



Half Long Luc Carrot. 



Half Long: French 
Scarlet Carrot. 






Long Red Carrot without Core. 



St. Valerie Carrot. 



Danver's Intermediate. 



36 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



JLong" Red, \Titliout core. A variety 
from France, which is of cylindiical shape, 
very smooth, bright scarlet color, and of fine 
flavor; has no heart or core. It is not quite so 
early as the Half Long, but more productive. 
Consider it a first-class variety for the table, 
and one that will come into general cultivation 
when better known. 

St. Valerie. A new variety from France, 
bright red in color; a httle larger and longer 
than the Half Long French, and stronger in 



the leaves. This is one of the finest carrots, 
and will in the course of time take the place of 
the Half Long. It is very smooth. 

Danver'S. An intermediate American 
variety of recent introduction. It is of a 
bright orange color; very smooth; symmetri- 
cally formed; somewhat stump-rooted like the 
Half Long Luc. It wiU produce more in 
weight to the acre than any other Half Long 
variety, 



CELERY. 

Celeki (Fr,), Selleeie (Ger.), Apio (Sp.j, 



Large White Solid. 
Perfection Heart icell. 
Turnip-Booted. 



Dioarf Large Bibbed. 
Golden Self Blanching. 
Cutting or Soup. 



Sow in May and June for early transplanting, and in August and September for a later crop. 
Sow thinly and shade during the hot months. VvTien the plants are six inches high, transplant 
into trenches about four inches deep, nine wide and two and a half feet apart^ made very rich 
by digging in rotten manure. Plants should be from 6 to 8 inches apart. When planted out 
during the hot months, the trenches require to be shaded, which is generally done by spreading 
cotton cloth over them; latanniers v.ill answer the same purpose. Celery requires plenty of 
moisture, and watering with soapsuds, or liquid manure, will benefit the plants a great deal. 
When tall enough, it should be earthed up to blanch to make it fit for the table. 

L<arg:e White Solid. This_ variety 
used to be planted exchisively, but since the 
introduction of half dwarf and dwarf kinds has 
been di-opped, more so. b}" market gardeners. 
It is crisp, but not as fine flavored as the 
following kinds. 

Perfectioia Sleartwell. This variety 
is in size between the Large White Solid and 
Dwarf kinds; it is of excellent quality, very 
thick, and when blanched the heart is of a 
beautiful golden yellow color; preferable to the 
White Solid, and one of the best kinds ever 
introduced. 




Perfection Heartwell Celery. 



Large White Solid Celery. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



37 



D^varf L<arg:e Ribbed. This kind 
was brought here several years ago from 
Prance. It is short, biit very thick-ribbed, 
solid and of fine flavor. The best dwarf 
variety for this section. 

OoSdeiB Self BlaiBcliing^. AFrench 
variety, of the best quality. The heart is solid, 
very tender, of a beautiful yellow color; the 
Tibs brittle and of delicious flavor. Cannot be 
too highly recommended. 

Celeriac or Turiiip-Kooted Cel- 
ery, is very popular in some parts of Europe, 
but hardlv cultivated here. It should b e sown 



in the fall of the year, and transplanted six 
inches apart. "When the roots have obtained 
a good size, they are boiled, scraped off, sliced 
and dressed with vinegar, etc., as a salad. 

Celery for Soup. This is sown in the 
spring of the year, broad-cast, to be used for 
seasoning, the same as Parsley. 





Celeriac or Turnip- Rooted Celery. 



Dwarf, Large Ribbed Celery. 



CHERVIL. 

Ceepetjil (Fr.), Kebbelkeaut (Ger.). 

An aromatic plant, used a good deal for seasoning, especially in 07/ster soup, and is often 
cut between Lettuce when served as a salad. In the North this vegetable is very little known, 
but in this section there is hardly a garden where it is not found. Sow broad-cast during faU 
for winter and spring, and in January and February for summer use. 



COLLARDS. 

A kind of cabbage which does not head, but the leaves are used the same as other cabbage. 
Not so popular as in former years, and very little planted in this vicinity. 



CORN SALAD. 

Mache, Doucet (Fr.), Ackek Salat (Ger.), Valeeiana (Sp.), 

Broad-leaved Corn Salad is the variety generally cultivated. It is used as a salad during the 
winter and early spring months. Should be sown broad-cast or in drills nine inches apart during 
fall and winter. 



38 



RICHARD FEOTSCilER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



CO^N. 

INDIAN. 
Mais (Fr.), Welschkokn (Ger.), Maiz (Sp.). 



Extra Early Dtcarf Sugar. 
Adam's Extra Early. 
Early Sugar or Siceet, 
Stoicel's Evergreen Sugar. 
Golden Dent G-ourd Seed. 
Early Yellow Canada. 
Large IVhite Flint. 



Blunt' s Prolific Field. 
Improved Learning. 
Golden Beauty. 
Champion White Pearl. 
Mosby's Prolific. 
Hickory King. 



Plant in hills about three feet apart, drop four to five seeds and thin out to t-vvo or three_ 
■\Miere the ground is strong the Adam's Extra Early and Crosby's Sugar can be planted in hills 
two and a half feet apart, as these two varieties are more dwarfish than the other kinds. Plant 
for a succession from February to June. 



Extra Early, oe' Crosl>y's l>^varf 
Ssigl'ar. This is a very early vaiiety and of 
excellent quahty. Ears small, but very tender. 
It is not so extensively planted as it deserves 
to be. 

Adam's Exira Early, the most 
popular variety with market gardeners for first 
planting. It has no fine table qualities, but as 



it grows to a good size, and is matiu-ed in abou 
forty days from time of planting, it meets witk 
ready sale in the market, and for these reasons 
gardeners prefer it. 

Early Sugar, or IVew Ei!g^Iand» 

A long eight-rowed variety, which succeed 
the Extra Early sorts. Desirable kind. 



mJim 





Improved Learning. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



39 



Stowel's Evcrg:i'eeii l^iii^ar. This 
is the best of all Sugar Corn. It is an early 
Oorn, but the ears are of large size, and are 
well filled. It remains green longer than any 
other variety, and is quite productive. The 
cultiviition of this excellent cereal, as well as 
«,11 other Sugar Corn, is much neglected, yet 
why people will plant common field-corn for 
table use, considering size instead of quality, 
I can not xmderstand. 

Oolden Dent Ootird Seed. A field 
"variety which is very productive at the North, 
It makes a very fine Corn South, but has to be 
planted here several years in succession before 
it attains perfection, as during the first year 
the ears are not well covered by the husk, 
which is the case with all Northern varieties. 
When selected and planted here for a few 
years, it becomes acclimated and makes an 
excellent Corn, with large, fine ears, grain 
deep and cob of medium size. 

Early Yei8©\^^ Casijada. A long 
eight-rowed variety. It is very early, and is 
planted in both the field and garden. It does 
well here, 

JLutrge WSutte Flieit. A very popular 
variety with gardeners and amateurs. It is 
planted here for table use principally, but like 
the Golden Dent, makes an excellent kind for 
iield culture after it has been planted here for 
two or three years, 

BluQit's Prolific Field Corn. This 
is a very excellent variety, either for the field 
or for the table. It is very prolific, producing 
irom four to six ears of corn. They are of 
jnedium size, but well filled and heavy. It is 
second early. This variety has done better 
than any other, and, being of Southern origin, 
it seems to be better adapted to our climate, 
I recommend it as an early yielding Corn for 
fiicld cultiare. 

Improved L.eaming'. An extra early 
variety, sold by me for the first time seven 
years ago. It is not hard and flinty, but sweet 
and nutritious, making excellent feed and fine 
meal. The ears are large and handsome, with 
deep large grains, deep orange color and small 
xed cob. It is very productive. The shucks 
«over the ear better than any Northern or 
"Western variety I have ever tried. It is 
adapted to a variety of soils, and produces 
well on heavy or light soil; it has shown itself 
as very reliable, 

Ooldeii Beauty. This variety is the 
handsomest of all yellow corn; the ears are of 
a perfect shape, long, and filled out to the 
•end of the cob. The grains are not of a flinty 
type, neither are they so soft as to be greatly 
shrivelled, as in the Golden Dent. Golden 
Beauty matures early, ripening in eighty days 
from planting, and surpasses aU in size and 
"beauty of grain, 

Champioii liTliite Pearl. This is 
a very handsome white com.,.' The grain is 
pure white, exceedingly heavy and long, two 



of which will span the cob, which is small. 
Being medium in size of stalk it can be planted 
much thicker than a large Corn, and at the 
same time bear a full sized ear. The originator 
has established in Champion White Pearl Corn 
a short, thick stalk, with the ear growing low 
upon it, which is an advantage in stormy 
weather. 



MosH^y's Prolifie 
Southern Corn, and is 



Corai, This is a 
recommended for 




Evergreen 
Sugar Corn. 



Early Sugar, or ^ 
New England Corn. 



Extra Early 
Sugar Corn, 



40 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



general crop. Tlie originator of this variety 
says: "This corn is a cross between two 
widely different varieties. It is purely white; 
small cob, deep, full grain, neither too hard 
nor too soft. It will stand crowding in the 
drill as close again as any other variety. Ears 



of medium size, but long. It stands the 
drought better than ordinary corn. " Should 
be planted early. 

Hickory K.iBSS^. This New Field Corn 
was introduced here by me three years ago. It 
has proven itself all that was claimed for it. 




Golden Beautv Corn. 



Hickory King Corn, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



41 



It is the Largest Grained and Smallest Cobbed 
Pure ^\^lite Dent Corn in the World. It is 
very early, and comes in succession to the 
Adams Early. The ears are from seven to nine 
inches in length, and are generally borne from 



three to five to a stalk, making it very pro- 
ductive. The ears are well covered by the 
shucks; a great consideration in Field Corn 
planted in the South. 



CRESS. 

Ceesson (Fr.), Kkesse (Ger.), Beeeo (Sp.). 

Used for salad during winter and spring. Sow broad-cast or in drills six inches apart. 

C&iB'letl or Pej>g>er Orass. Not much used in this section. 

Broad-£.eaved. This variety is extensively cultivated for the market. It is sown 
from early fall to late spring. The leaves resemble Water Cress; a variety which does not well 
succeed here. Is considered a very wholesome dish. 

CUCUMBER. 

CoNCOMBKE (Fr.), GuEEE (Ger.), Pepino (Sp.). 

Improved Early White Spine. Early Cluster. 

Early Frame. New Orleans Market. 

Long Green Turkey. Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling. ) 

Cucumbers need a rich soil. Plant in hills from three to four feet apart; the hills should 
be made rich with- well decomposed manure, and eight to ten seeds should be planted in each 
hill, and covered about one-half inch deep ; when well up, thin out to four plants in the hill till 
the vines meet. When the spring is dry the plants have to be watered, else they do not keep in 
bearing long. They can be planted'from March till July. A great many cucumbers are planted 
here in February, or even sooner, and are protected by small boxes with a pane of glass on top. 
These boxes are removed during the day, and put back in the evening. When days are cloudy 
and cold, the plants are kept covered. 



Improved Early Wliate §piaie. 
This is the most popular variety. It is of 
medium size, light green, covered with v/hite 
spines, and turns; white when ripe. The best 



kind for shipping. Of late years it is used by 
most gardeners for forcing as well as outdoor 
culture. It is very productive. 





Improved Early White Spine. 



New Orleans Market. 



42 



EICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 




West India Gherkin. 



Earlv Frame. 



Early Cluster. 



Early Fraiaie. Another eaiiy variety, 
but not so x)opular as the foregoing kind. it 
is deep green in color, but turns yelloyr very 
quickly ; therefore gardeners do not plant it 
much. 

L.oiig"GreeH Turkey. A long variety 
attaining a length of fi'om fifteen to eighteen 
inches vrhen vrell grown. Very fine and pro- 
ductive. 

Early Cluster. Early, short and 
prickly; it bears in clusters. 

ISew Orleans I^Iarket. This is a va- 
riety selected from an imported forcing 
cucumber introduced bv me. It is good for 



forcing or open ground; very i^roductive, keeps 
its green color, and has few vines. This kind 
can not be excelled for shipping, as it produces 
very perfect cucumbei-s and but few culls; the 
largest growers of cucumbers for shipping 
about here plant none but this variety. It is 
quite different from the Long "White Spine 
offered by some. 

"West India GSierkin, This is an 
oval variety, small in size. It is used for pick- 
ling when young and tender. "^Tien grown to 
its full size it can be stewed with meat. In 
fact, this is the only use made of it about Xew 
Orleans. 



ECC-PLANT. 

ArBEP.GixE (Tr.), Ezeepflanze iGer.\ Beeexgena (Sp.). 

The seed should be so^vn in hot-beds in the early pari of January. "When a couple of inches 
high they should be transplanted into another irame, so that the plants may become strong and 
robust. "When warm enough, generally during March, the plants can be placed in the open 
ground, about two and a half feet aparti This vegetable is very profitable in the South, and 
extensively cultivated. 





Early Dwarf Oval. 



New York Market. 



FOR THE SOUTHEKN STATES. 



43 




New Orleans Market. 



L,arge Pwrpfie, or New Orleans 

Market. Tliis is tlie only kind grown here ; 
it is large, oval in shape and of a dark purple 
<?olor and very productive. Southern grown 
seed of this, as of a good many other tropical 
or sub-tropical vegetables, is preferable to 
Northern seed, as it will germinate more readi- 
ly, and the plant will last longer during the 
Jiot season. It is the best variety for shipping, 
superior to the Northern raised kinds. It cai'- 
xies better. The cut is made from three com- 
mon specimens and represents the true form. 



EarBy I>'^varf Oval. This variety is 
very early and productive; the fruit is not so 
large as the New Orleans Egg-Plant, but equal 
in flavor. For market it will not sell as well 
as the former; desirable for family garden. 

Tine New York Market. Is rounder 
in shape than the New Orleans ; it has spines 
on leaves and stems, not very popular here. 
Shippers and gardeners always give the New 
Orleans Market variety the preference. 



END9VE. 

Chicoeee (Fr.), Endivien (G-er.), Endibia (Sp.). 

A salad plant which is very popular and much cultivated for the market, princiiDally for 
summer use. It can be sown in drills a foot apart, and when the plants are well up, thinned 
out till about eight inches apart. Or it can be sown broad-cast thinly and transplanted the 
same as Lettuce. When the leaves are large enough, say about eight inches long, tie them up 
ior blanching, to make them fit for the table. This' can only be done in dry v/eather, otherwise 
the leaves are apt to rot. For summer use do not sow before the end of March, as if sown sooner, 



44 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Green Curled Endive. 




Early White Vienna Kohl-Rabi. 




Large London Flag Leek. 



the plants will run into seed very early. 
Sow for a succession duiing the spring and 
summer months. For winter use sow in.^ 
September and October. 

Oreeii Curled. Is the most desirable 
kind, as it stands more heat than the follow- 
ing sort, and is the favorite market variety. 

Extra Fine Curled. Does not 
grow quite so large as the foregoing, and is 
more apt to decay when there is a wet sum- 
mer. Better adapted for winter. 

Broad-Leaved, or Escarolle. 

Makes a fine salad when well grown and 
blanched, especially for summer. 

GARLIC. 

Oarlie. There is more Garlic grown in 
Louisiana than in any other State, or all States 
together. It is a staj)le product of the lower 
Parishes. It is raised for home consumption 
and shipping. It is used for flavoiing stews, 
roasts, and various other dishes. People fi-om 
the South of Europe use much more than the 
inhabitants of the United States. — It should 
be planted in October and November, in diilla 
two to three feet apart, about six inches in the 
drills and one inch deep. The distance be- 
tween the rows depends upon the mode of 
cultivation; if planted in the garden, a foot 
between the rows is sufficient. It is cultivated 
like Onions; in the Spring they are taken up 
and plaided together in a string by the tops. 
One of these strings contains about from 50 
to 70 heads in double rows; they are then 
stored or rather hung up in a dry, airy place. 
They keep from 6 to 8 months. 

KOHL-RABi. or TURNIP- 
ROOTED CABBAGE. 

Chou Navet (Fr.), Kohl-Eabi (Ger.), 
Col de Nabo (Sp.). 
This vegetable is very popular with the 
European population of this city, and largely 
cultivated here. It is used for soups, or pre- 
pared in the same manner as Cauliflower. 
For late fall and vvinter use it should be sown 
from the end of July till the middle of Octo- 
ber ; for spring use during Januar^^ and Febru- 
ary. "When the young plants are one month old 
transplant them in rows one foot apart, and 
about the same distance in the rows. They 
also grow finely if se^^^n broad-cast and thinned 
out when young, so that the j)lants are not toa 
crowded ; or, they may be sown in drills, and 
cultivated the same as Euta Bagas. 

Early White YieaiBsa. The finest 
variety of all, and the only kind I keep. It is 
early, forms a smooth bulb, and has few small 
leaves. The so-called large White or Green is 
not desirable. 

LEEK. 

PoiBEAU (Fr.), Lauch (Ger.), Pueko (Sp.). 

A species of Onion, highly esteemed for 
flavoring soups. Should be sown broad-cast 
and transplanted, when about six to eight 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



45 



inches Mgh, into rows a foot apart, and six 
inches apart in the rows. Should be planted 
at least four inches deep. They require to be 
well cultivated in order to secure large roots. 
Sow in October for winter and spring use, and 
in January and February, for sixmmer. 



Large JLondon Flag^. Is the kind 
most generally grown. 

Larg^c Carentan. This is a new 
French variety which grows to a very large 
size; takes the place of the former. 



LETTUCE. 

Laitue (Fr.), Lattice (Ger.), Lechuga (Sp.). 



Early Cabbage, or White Butter Head. 
Improved Royal Cabbage. 
Brown Dutch Cabbage. 
Drumhead Cabbage. 



White Paris Coss. 

Perpignan. 

New Orleans Improved Large Passion. 

Trocadero. 



Lettuce is sown here during the whole year by the market gardener. Of course it takes a 
gi-eat deal of labor to produce this vegetable during our hot summer months. For directions 
how to sprout the seed during that time, see "Work for June." The richer and better the 
ground the larger the head will be. No finer Lettuce is grown anywhere else than in New 
Orleans during fall and spring. The seed should be sown broad-cast, when large enough, plan- 
ted out in rows a foot apart, and from eight to ten inches apart in rows. Some kinds grow larger 
than others ; for instance, Butterhead will not require as much space as Drumhead or Perpignan. 




Drumhead Cabbage Lettuce. 




Early Cabbage or White Butter Lettuce. 

Early Cabbagre, or W^liite But- 
te r. An early variety, forming a solid head, 
but not quite so large as some others. It is 
the best kind for family use, to sow during 
fall and early spring, as it is very early and of 
good flavor. 

Improved Royal Cabbag^e. This 
is the most popular variety in this State. Heads 
hght green, of large size, and about two weeks 
later than the White Butter. It is very tender 
and crisp ; can be sown later in the spring 




Perpignan Lettuce. 




White Paris Coss Lettuce. 

than the foregoing kind, and does not run into 
seed so quickly. 

Brown Dutch Cabbag^e. A very 
hard kind, forms a solid head ; not so popular 
as many other kinds ; good for winter. 

Drumhead €abbag:e. An excellent 
spring variety, forming large heads, the outer 
leaves curled. 

White Paris Coss. This is very popu- 
lar with the New Orleans market gardeners, as 
it is the favorite with the French population. 



46 



RICHAPwD TROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




It grows to perfection and forms 
large, fine heads, particularly in 
the spring of the year. 

PerpJ§rnaBi. A fine German 
variety which forms large, light 
green heads, and which stands the 
heat better than the Royal. It is 
much cultivated for the market, 
as it thrives well when sown dur- 
ing the latter end of spring. 

Xew Orleans Improved 
L<ar^e Passion. This is a 
large Cabbage Lettuce introduced 
by me from California; it attains a 
large size, grows slowly, but heads 
very hard. It does better here dur- 
ing late autumn and winter than 
in summer, as it cannot stand the 
heat. If sown late in the fall and 
transplanted during winter, it 
grows to very large heads, hard and firm. It is the 
kind shipped from here in the S23ring, and cannot 
be surpassed for that purpose. 

Trocadero L<ettuce. This is a new Cab- 
bage Lettuce from France; it is of hght green color, 
forming a large solid head, resembling the Xew 
Orleans Improved Passion Lettuce somewhat in 
appearance; however, the leaves are thinner, and 
therefore, not so well adapted for shipi)ing ; it is 
excellent for forcing. 

MELON. 

MUSK OE CAXTELOUPE. 

Osage. 

Netted Xidmeg. 

Netted Citron. 

Pine Apple. 

Early White Japan. 

Persian or Cassaba. 

New Orleans Market. 

Melons require a rich sandy loam. If the 
ground is not rich enough, a couple of shovels 
full of rotted manure should be mixed into 
each hill, which ought to be from five to six 
feet apart ; drop ten or twelve seeds, and when 
the plants have two or three rough leaves, thin 
out to three or four plants. Canteloupes are 
cultivated very extensively in the neigljbor- 
hood of New Orleans ; the quahty is very fine 
and far superior to those raised in the North. 
Some gardeners plant during February and 
cover with boxes, the same as described for 
Cucumbers. TNTien Melons are ripening, too 
much rain will impair the flavor of the fniit. 

This varietv is 
It 
is small and does not look very attractive, but 
is of excellent flavor. Eecommend it highly 
for family use or for shipping ^Yest. It v>ill 
not sell well in this market until its fine eating 

qualities are better known. People here are accustomed to roughly netted melons, such as 

the New Orleans Market. The Osage is smooth, very shghtly netted.' 

IVelted IViitSDieg- Melon. SmaU ovid melon, roughly netted, early, and of fine flavor. 
]\etled Ciffron Canteloiss^e. This variety is larger than the foregoing kind; it is 

more rounded in shape, of inedium size and roughlv' netted. 




Osagre.i^IusR Melon. 

cultivated largely for the Chicago Market. 



Osage Melon. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



47 




Note.— The above cut represents the New Orleans Melon; it has been taken from a common speci- 
men grown by one of my customers, who raises the seed of this variety for me. 



Pine Apple CanteloMpe. A medium 
sized early variety, oval in shape, and of very 
fine flavor. 

Early \¥liite Japan Canle- 
loupe. An early kind, of creamish white 
color, very sweet, and of medium size. 

'Persian or Cassatoa. Alarge variety, 
of oval shape and delicate flavor. The rind of 
this kind is very thin, which is a disadvantage 
in handling, and prevents it from being plant- 
ed for the market. Very fine for family use. 

New Orleans Market. A large 
species of the citron kind. It is extensively 
grown for this market; large in size, very 
roughly netted and of luscious flavor; different 
altogether from the Northern Netted Citron, 
which is earlier but not so fine in flavor, and 
not half the size of the variety grown here. 



The New Orleans Market cannot be excelled 
by any other variety in the world. In a 
favorable season it is a perfect gem. I have 
tried it alongside of varieties praised at the 
North, such as are brought out every year, — 
but none of them could compare with the 
New Orleans Market. As for some years past 
the seeds were scarce I had some grown North, 
but they lost their fine qualities, size and 
flavor. It requires a Southern sun to bring 
the seed to perfection. Small varieties of 
melons will improve in size if cultivated here 
for a number of years, and if care is taken 
that no Cucumbers, Squashes, Gourds or 
Pumpkin arc cultivated in the vicinity. If the 
best and earliest specimens are selected for 
seed, in three or four years the fruit will be 
large and fine. 



WATEK. 

Melon d'Eau (Er,), Wasseemelone (Ger.), Sandia (Sp,). 
Ice- Cream (White Seeded.) Kolb Gem. 

Rattle Snake. Florida's Favorite. 

Mammoth Iron Clad. Seminole. 

Pride of Georgia. 
Water Melon will grow and produce in places where Canteloupe will not do well. The soil 
for this plant should be hght and sandy. Plant in hills about eight feet apart, eight to twelve 
seeds in a hill ; when the plants are well up thin out to three. The plants should be hoed of- 
ten, and the ground between the hills kept clean till the vines touch. 



Ice Cream. (White Seeded.) A me- 
dium sized variety of excellent quality. It is 
early and very productive. Being thin in the 



rind it is not so well adapted for the market 
as the other kinds ; notwithstanding this, it is 
grown exclusively by some for that, on account 



48 



KICHAKD FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



of its earliness. It lias come into general 
cultivation more and more every year, as it is 
very sweet, and sells readily in the market. 
Rsi-ttle Snake. An old Southern varie- 
ty which has come into notice of late years. 
It is of large size, light green, with large dark 
stripes, and is identical with the Gipsey. Fine 
market variety. It stands transportation 
better than most other kinds ; has been the 
standard market variety till the Kolb's Gem 
was introduced. However, it always will 
remain a favorite with market-gardeners. 
The seed I offer of this variety, is grown for 
me by one of the best growers in Georgia. It 
is of the purest strain that can be found. 



Mammoth Iron Clad. Highly re- 
commended North. It did not do as well as 
Southern raised seed. I have the seed now 
grown in Florida, and, no doubt, it will give 
better satisfaction. 

Pride of €Jeor§-|a. A variety from 
Georgia, of excellent quality; attains a large 
size when well cultivated. A very good varie- 
ty for family use. 

l£oll> ©em. Only a few years since this 
variety has been introduced, but the shipping 
qualities are so good, that the bulk of melons 
raised for the market are of that kind. Flesh 
crimson, very thin but rough rind; fine flavor 
and full of flesh, no hollow in the middle. 




Mammoth Iron Clad. 




Florida's Favorite. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



49 



It is the heaviest melon for its size. What I 
offer are Southern grown seeds. 

Florida's Favorite. This Melon 
originated with W. M. Girardeau, of Monti- 
cello, Fla. It is an excellent variety, very 
prolific, earlier than the Kolb Gem, Eattlo- 



snake or Pride of Georgia, and very fine for 
the tal)le. It is not as good for shipping as 
the Kolb Gem, or Eattlesnake; it is of medium 
size, colorcid with light and dark green stripes 
alternately, flesh deep red, deliciously sweet, 
very firm and crisp. One of the best Melons. 





Pi-ide of Georgia 




Kolb's Gem. 



50 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 






t^^^ 
"% 







Seminole. A novelty of recent intro- 
duction. A very early Melon, oblong in shape, 
of two colors, some grey and others light 



green, resembling the Ice Cream, but larger 
in size. It is fine flavored and very produc- 
tive. 



White or Yellow 
Large Leaved Curled. 



MUSTARD. 

MouTAEDE (Fr.), Senf (Ger.), Mosta2;a (Sp.). 

Seeded. \ Chinese very large C-dbhage-Leaved. 



New Golden Leaved. 



This is grown to qiiite an extent in the Southern States, and is sown broad-cast during fall, 
winter and spring. It may be used the same as Spinach, or boiled -^dth meat as greens. The 
White or Yellow Seeded is very little cultivated, and is used chiefly for medical purposes, or 
pickling. The large-leaved or Curled has black seed, a distinct kind from the Northern or 
European variety. The seed is raised in Louisiana. It makes very large leaves; cultivated 
more and more every year. 



L.arg-e- Leaved Ciirfled. This is the 
favorite kind here, sown largely for the market. 
Leaves are pale green, large and curled or 
scalloped on the edges. 

Cliaiiesc Very Large Cabbage- 
Leaved. This is a European variety, with 
light green very large leaves. It has not the 
same taste as the large-leaved or the large 



curled, but ^dll stand longer before going to 
seed. 

New Oolden Leaved. This variety 
is of recent introduction. The smooth leaves 
are \exj hght green, almost yellow, fi-om which 
the name. It is of good flavor, and when pre- 
pared for the table cannot be distinguished 
from Spinach. 



NASTURTIUM. 

Capucine (Fr.), Ini)ia>t:sche Keesse (Ger.), Capuchina (Sp.). 
Tall I Dwarf. 

Planted here only for ornament. (For description see List of Climbing Plants.) 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



51 



Green Tall- Growing. 



OKRA. 

Dwarf Green. 



White Velvet. 



This is a highly esteemed vegetable in the South, and no garden, whether small or large, is 
without it. It is used in making ' 'Gumbo, " a dish the Creoles of Louisiana know how to pre- 
pare better than any other nationality. It is also boiled in salt and water, and served with 
vinegar as a salad, and is considered a very wholesome dish. Should not be planted before the 
ground is warm in spring as the seeds are apt to rot. Sow in drills, which ought to be two to 
three feet apart, and when up, thin out, and leave one or two plants every twelve or fifteen 
inches. 



Tall €rrowillg:. This is the variety 
most cultivated here. The pods are long, 
round towards the end, and keep tender 
longer than the square podded kind. 

Dwarf Crreen. This is a very early and 
prolific variety, and remains tender longer 
than any other. It has come into general 
cultivation, planted much more than the tall. 
It may be said here, that all dwarf varieties, 
when cultivated here in this locality for some 
years^ will grow taller every year. 



I>w^ai'f White. Similar to the foregoing 
kind, except the pods being of a light green 
color. 

White Velvet. A white variety; dwarf, 
with round, smooth pods, free from ridges and 
seams, and not prickly to the touch; very 
prolific and early. I tried this variety the 
last four years, and sold a good deal of the 
seed last year. It has come up to what is 
claimed for it. I recommend it to all who 
have not tried it. 




White Velvet. 




Tall Growing Okra. 



ONION 



Ognon (Fr.), ZwiEBEL (Ger.), Cebolla (Sp.). 

Louisiana or Creole. i White Bermuda. 

Red Bermuda. \ White Queen. 

The Onion is one of the most important vegetables, and is grown to a large extent in 
Louisiana. It is one of the surest crops to be raised, and always sells. Thousands of barrels 
are shipped in Spring from here to the Western and Northern States. There is one peculiar 
feature about raising Onions here, and that is, they can only be raised from Southern or so- 
called Creole seed. No seed from North, West, or any part of Europe, will produce a 
merchantable Onion in the South. When the crop of Creole seed is a failure, and they are 
scarce, they will bring a good price, having been sold as high as ten dollars a pound, when at 
the same time Northern seed could be had for one-fourth of that price. Northern raised seed 
can be sown to be used green, but as we have Shallots here which grow during the whole 



52 



EICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



autumn and vrnxtev, and multiply very rapidly, the sowing of seed for green Onions is not 
profitable. Seed ought to be sown from the middle of September to the end of October ; if sown 
sooner, too many will throw up seed stalks. ^\Tien the month of September has been dry and hot 
the beds where the seeds are sown ought to be covered with moss. Where this cannot be had,' 
palmettos can be used, but they should be taken ofE in the evening and replaced in the morning. 
When the seeds are well up, this is no longer necessary, but watering should be continued' 
—They are generaUy sown broad-cast, and when the size of a goose quUl should be transplanted 
into rows one to two feet apart, and about five inches in the rows. Onions are different in 
regard to rotation, from other vegetables. They do best if raised on the same ground for a 
succession of years. Onions did not bring very high prices, owing to the very heavy yield, the 
largest ever made in Louisiana upon the same acreage. The crop of seed has been a complete 
failure; have not been able to fill any orders. 

Louisiana or Creole Onion. This 
is generally of a light red color, darker than 
the Strassburg, and lighter in color than the 
Wethersfield. The seed I have been selling of 



this kind, for a number of years, has been 
raised on Bayou Lafourche, and has never 
failed to make fine large Onions, 



The crop of Creole Onion seed having failed some years ago, I sold a good deal of Italian seed 
and had ample opportunity to see the results. The Giant Roca I have discarded; it takes too 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



53 



long to bulb and is very spongy. The Red Tripoli has done fairly, but the Onions do not 
mature as early as the Creole, and do not keep so well, although attaining a good size. It is of 
mild flavor, and well adapted to be used up in spring; but I would not recommend it to be 
raised for shipping, except the White Queen. 

Red Bermuda. (True). The crop of 
the Creole Onion having been a failure this 
year, I have obtained a supply of the Genuine 
Bermuda Seed. This is a pale red flat onion 
of good size and does fairly well. It is not to 
be confounded with an Onion sold by some 
seedsmen under that name, which is the 
Italian Bassano; it is oval in shape, of bright 

color, or if flat it is the Bed Tripoli. They Bermuda Onion 

are both inferior to the genuine Bermuda if 

planted in this section. fWhite Bermuda. Same as the fore- 

going kind; except being white in color. 




ITALIAN ONIONS. 



White Queen. This is a medium sized, 
white variety from Italy, very early and flat; 
can be sown as late as February, and good 
sized bulbs will yet be obtained. It is of mild 



flavor and very fine when boiled and dressed 
for the table. It can not be too highly 
recommended. 



SHALLOTS. 

EcHAIiLOTTE (Fr.), SCHAIOTTEN (Gcr,). 

A small sized Onion which grows in clumps. It is generally grown in the South, and used 
in its green state for soups, stew, etc. There are two varieties, the Bed and White; the latter 
variety is the most popular. In the fall of the year the bulbs are divided and set out in rows a 
foot apart, and four to six inches in the rows. They grow and multiply very fast, and can be 
divided during Tranter, and set out again. Late in Spring, when the tops become dry, they have 
to be taken up, thoroughly dried, and stored in a dry airy place. 



Plain Leaved. 
Double Curled. 



PARSLEY. 

Persel (Fr.), Peteksilie (Ger.), Peejxl (Sp.). 

I Improved Garnishing. 



Parsley can be sown during the fall from August to October, and during Spring, from the 
end of January to the end of April. It is generally sown broad-cast. 



Plain Leaved. This is the kind raised 
for the New Orleans market. 

Double Curled. The leaves of this 
variety are curled. It has the same flavor as 
the other kind, but is not so popular. 



Improved Oarnisliin^. This is the 
best kind to ornament a dish ; it has the same 
flavor as the other kinds. 



PARSMBP. 

Panais (Fr.), Pastinake (Ger.), Pastinaca (Sp.). 

Hollow Grown, or Svjjar. 

Should be sown in deep, mellow soil, deeply spaded, as the roots are long, in drills twelve to 
eighteen inches apart; when the plants are three inches high, thin out to three inches apart in 
the row. Sow from September to November for winter, and January to March for spring and 
summer crops. 



The Hollow Crown, or Sug^ar. 

is the kind generally cultivated; it possesses 



all the good qualities for which other varieties 
are recommended. 



64 



RICHAKD FBOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



PEAS. 

Pois (Ft.), Ebbse (^Grer.), Gctsa^te (Sp.). 



EABLTEST. 



Cleveland's Alaska, 2^feei. 

Extra Early, or First and Best, 2^feei. 

Early Washingto7i, 3 feet. 



Early Tom Thumb, Ifooi. 
L<tjdon's Alpha, 3 feet. 
American WoiuJer, lA feet. 



^Bishop's Bicarf Long Pod, li feet. 
Champion of England, _ o feet. 
McLean's Advancer, 3 feet. 
Carter s Stratagem, 2hfeet. 



Lficarf Blue Impeinal, 3 fed. 
Boyal Dirarf Marrow, 3 feet. 
Black Eyed Marrowfat, 4 f^e 



SECOND CROP. 

j McLeans Little Gem, Ihfeei. 

I LaxtorCs Prolifc LoJig Bod, 3 feet. 

Eugenie, 3 feet. 
Carter's Telephone, 5 feet. 



GEXEEAL CROP. 



Large White Marrowfat, 4 feet 
Dwart' Sugar, 2^ feet. 
TaU Sugar, 6 feet 



Peas are a fine vegetable, and therefore are very generally cultivated. It is best to plant in 
grotind manured the previous year, else they -will make more vines than peas. As a general 
thing the dwarf kinds require richer ground than the tall growing varieties. Marrowfat Peas 
planted in rich ground will not bear well, but they produce finely in sandy light soil. 

The Extra Early, Tom Thumb and Laxton's Alpha will not produce a large crop without being 
in rich ground. Peas have to be planted in drills two inches deep and from two to three feet 
apart, accordins; to the height they may grow. Tom Thumb can be planted one foot apart, 
whereas "S^Tiite Marrowfat or Champion of Eneland require three feet. The Extra Early, Alpha 
and Tom Thumb can be planted during August and September for fall. During November and 
December we plant the Marrowfats; January and Eebruary, as late as March, all kinds can be 




Alaska. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



5S 



planted, but for the latter raonth only the earliest varieties should be used, as the late varieties. 
will get mildewed before they bring a crop. Peas will bear much better if some brush or rods- 
are stuck in the drills to support them, except the very dwarf kinds. 



Alaskn. This is an extra early Pea, blue 
in color, the earliest by a few days of any 
other kind; very pure and i)rolific, the best 
flavored pea among the Extra Early smooth 
podded kinds. Recommend it highlj^ 

Extra Early, or First aaid Best. 
This was the earliest Pea cultivated, until the 
Alaska was introduced; very popular with the 
small market gardeners here, who have rich 
grounds. It is very productive and good 
flavored. The stock I sell is as good as any 
other in the country, not surpassed by any, 
no matter whose name is put before "Extra 
Early." 

Eargy IV^saiang-ton, EarSy May 
or Fraisae, which are all nearly the same 
thing; is about ten days later than the Extra 
Early. It is very productive and keeps longer 
in bearing than the foregoing kind. Pods a 
little smaller. Very popular about New Orleans, 




T O in T Bi IB 131 b . Very dwarfish and quite 
productive. Can be cultivated in rows a foot 
apart; requires no branches or sticks. 

EaxtOBi's AlEi>lia. This is a variety of 
recent introduction; it is the earliest wrinkled 
kind in cultivation; of delicious flavor and 
very prolific. This variety deserves to be 
recommended to all who like a first-class peA. 
It will come into general cultivation when. 
better known. 

AflBiericaM Wonder. A wrinkled pea 
of dwarf growth, 10 to 12 inches; it is prolific, 
early, and of fine quality; it comes in after 
the Extra Early. 

Bishop's 5>warf I^oaig" Pod. An. 
early dwarf variety; very stout and branching; 
requires no sticks but simply the earth drawn 
around ^he roots. It is very productive and 
of excellent quality. 



Extra Early, or First and Best. 




Carter's Stratagem, 



56 



KICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Carter's Telephone. 



.Cliampioii of Eiigiaiad. A green, 
wrinkled variety of very fine flavor; not 
profitable for the market, but recommended 
for family use. 

McE.eaii-a'is Advaiacei\ This is an- 
other green, wrinkled variety, about two v/eeks 
earlier than the foregoing kind. 

McLean's IL<ittle Gesis. A dwarf, 
wrinkled variety of recent introduction. It is 
€arly, very prolific and of excellent flavor. 
Keqnires no sticks. 

L.axf©e's FroliHc I^oeig- F©«l. A 
green marrow pea of good quality. Pods are 
long and well filled. It is second early, and 
can be recommended for the use of market 
gardeners, being very prolific. 

EMg"enie« A white wrinkled variety, of 
fine flavor; it is of the same season as the 
Advancer. Cannot be too highly recommended 
for family use. 

Carter's Stratag-em. This is a 
wrinkled variety from England. It is very 
distinct in vine and foliage, growing thick and 
large, does not need any support. It is the 
Largest Podded variety ever brought out, pods 
4 — 52 inches long, which cannot be surpassed 
in flavor, and is very productive. Eecommend 
it highly. 



Carter's Telepliosnse. Another v/rin- 
kled English late variety; grows about from Uy 
to 5 feet high. The pods are'very long con- 
taining from 8—12 fine flavored Peas. It is 
productive; will bear twice as much as the 
Champion of England which is about of the 
same season. 

I>M^aFf Hiite iBSiperial. A very good 
bearer if planted early, pods are large and well 
filled. 

ISoystI H-warf M arroTt% Similar to 
the large Marrowfat, but of dwarf habit. 

ISiacli-eyed Marro\¥fiit. This kind 
is planted more for the market than any other. 
It is very productive, and when young, quite 
tender. Grows about four feet high. 

lL.arg-e l^Saite Marro^wfat. Similar 
to the last variety, except that it grows about 
two feet taller, and is less productive. 

©'warf Saag^ar. A variety of which the 
whole pod can be used after the string is drawn 
off from the back of the pod. Three feet high. 

Tall §M§"ar. Has the same qualities as 
the foregoing kind, only grows taller, and the 
pods are somewhat larger. Neither of these 
two varieties are very popular here. 



THE PEA BUG. 

All peas grown near Philadelphia have small holes in them, caused by the sting of the Pea 
Bug, while the pod is forming, when it deposits its egg in it. Later the insect perfects itself 
and comes out of the dry pea, leaving the hole. 

The germ of the pea is never destroyed, and they grow equallj^ as well as those without 
holes. Market gardeners in this neighborhood who have been planting these Extra Early Peas 
for years, will not take them, without holes, and consider these a trade mark. 



FIELD O^ COW PEAS. 

There are a gi-eat many varieties of Cow Peas, different in color and growth. They are 
planted mostly for fertilizing purposes and are sown broad-cast; when in a good stand, and of 
sufficient height, they are plowed under. The Clay Pea is the most popular. There are several 
varieties called crowders, which do not grow as tall as the others, but produce a great many 
pods, which are used green, the same as snap-beans, and if dried, like dried beans, make a very 
good dish. The crowders are of an oblong shape, almost pointed at one end; they are on an 
average larger than the other Field Peas. Lady Peas are small, white, with a black eye; they 
are generally planted between corn, so that they can run up on it. Dry, they are considered 
the very best variety for cooking. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



57 



PEPPER. 

PiMENT (Fr.), Spanischer Pfepfee (Ger.), Pimento (Sp.). 



Bell or Bull Xose. 
Sweet Spanish Monstrous. 
Sweet Ruby King. 
Golden Dawn Mango. 
Long Red Cayenne. 



Red Cherry. 
Bird Eye. 
Chili. 
Tabasco. 
Red Cluster. 



Pejjpers are tender and require to be raised in the hot-bed. Seed should be sown in 
January, and when large enough transplanted into the ground in rows from one and a half to 
two feet apart, and a foot to a foot and a half in the rows. There are more Peppers raised 
here than in other sections of the country; the hot varieties are used for seasoning and making 
pepper sauce; the mild variety is highly esteemed for salad. Care should be taken not to grow 
different kinds close together, as they mix very readily. 



Svreet SpanssSi or rHoMStroaas. 
A very popular variety, much cultivated. 
It is very mild, grows to a large size, tapering 
towards the end, and, when green, is used as 
a salad. Superior for that purpose to any 
other kind. 

Sweet Pepper, Rattoy Ming-. This 
variety grows to a larger size than the Sweet 



j Spanish Monstrous, and is of different shape. 

i The fruit is from 5 to 6 inches long by about 
3 to 4 inches in diameter, and of a bright red 
color. It is remarkably mild and f)leasant in 
flafor, and can be sliced and eaten as a salad, 
the same as the Spanish Monstrous. Single 





L;n g Red Cayenne Pepiier. 



Red Cherry Pepper. 



58 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



plants ripen from 8 to 10 fruits, making this 
"variety both productive and profitable. A 
decided acquisition. 

GoldeBS I>awBa ]TIan§:«. This sweet 
pepper attracted much attention for the last 
few years, and was admired by all who saw 
it. I believe it to be all the originator claims 
for it. In shape and size it resembles the 
iJell. Color, a bright icaxy golden yellow ; very 
"brilliant and handsome. Single plants ripen 
from twelve to twenty-four fruits, making 
them productive and profitable. They are 




Red Cluster Pepper. 



entirely exempt from any fiery taste or flavor, 
and can be eaten as readily as an apple. 

KelS or BuBa Wose. Is a large oblong 
variety which is not sweet or mild, as thought 
by some people. The seeds are very hot. 
Used for pickling. 

LiOBig'Red.Cs^ycnne. Is very hot and 
pungent. Cultivated here and used for pepper 
sauce and seasoning purposes. There are two 
varieties, one is long and straight, and the 
other like shown in cut, which is the only kind 
I keep. 

Med C lierry. A small roundish variety, 
very hot and productive. 

Bird Eye. Small, as the name indicates. 
It is very hot and used principally for pepper 
vinegar. 

C ili IL A small variety, from three-fourths 
to an inch long. It is strong, and used for 
pepper sauce; very prolific. 

'TstbilSC®. True. Another small variety, 
used more for pepper sauces than any other 
kind; the fruit is easily gathered, growing 
almost erect on the branches. 

IS I'd Ciiaster. A new variety of which 
the pods grow in bunches, upright like the 
Chili which the pods resemble, but are a little 
larger. It is quite distinct; ornamental on 
account of the bright fruit and compact 
growth of the plant. It is hot and pungent. 



Early Bose. 
Breese's Peerless. 
Extra Early Vermont 
Snowfiake. 
Beauty of Hebron. 



POTATOES. 

PoMME DE Tebke (Fr.), Kaetoffel (Ger.). 

White Elephant. 
Bural Blush. 
Bural New Yorker No. 
The Thorburn. 
Early Sunrise. 



The above varieties were tried on the grounds of the Louisiana Experiment 
Stations at Calhoun and Audubon Park, Nev7 Orleans ; among 150 different kinds 
tested they gave about the best results, both in yield and quality. 

Potatoes thrive and produce best in a light, dry, but rich soil. Well decomposed stable manure 
is the best, but if not to be had, cotton seed meal, bone dust, or any other fertilizer should be 
used to make the ground rich enough. If the ground was planted the fall previous with Cow 
Peas, which were plowed under, it will be in good condition for Potatoes. Good sized tubers 
should be selected for planting, which can be cut in pieces not too small; each piece ought to 
contain at least three eyes. Plant in drills from two to three feet apart, according to the 
space and how to be cultivated afterwards. Field culture, two and a half to three feet apart; 
for garden, two feet will answer. We plant potatoes here from end of December to end of 
March, but the surest time is about the first of February. If planted early they should be 
l^lanted deeper than if planted late, and hilled up as they grow. If potatoes are planted shallow 
and not hilled soon, they will suffer more, if caught by a late frost, than if planted deep and 
hilled up well. Early potatoes have not the same value here as in the North, as the time of 
planting is so long, and very often the first planting gets cut down by a frost, and a late 
planting, which may just be peeping through the ground, will escape and produce in advance 
of the first planted. A fair crop of potatoes can be raised here if planted in August; if the 
autumn is not too dry, they will bring nice tubers by the end of November. They should not 
be cut if planted at this time of the year, but planted whole. They should be put in a moist 
place before planting, so they may sprout. The early varieties are preferable for this time of 
planting. 

I have been handhng several thousand barrels of potatoes every season for planting, and 
make Seed Potatoes a specialty. The potatoes I sell are Eastern grown, which, as every one 
interested in potato culture knows, are superior and preferable to Western grown. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



59 



I have tried and introduced all new kinds here; but of late so many have come out that it 
is almost impossible to keep up with them. New rarieties of potatoes come oiit with fancy- 
prices, but these prices for new potatoes do not pay here, as we can keep none over for seed, 
and any person raising for the market would not realize a cent more for a new fancy variety 
per ban-el, than for a barrel of good Peerless or Early Rose. Earliness is no consideration, as. 
we plant from December to end of March. Somebody may plant Early Rose in December and 
another in February, and those planted in February come to the market first; it depends 
entirely upon the season. If late frosts set in, early planted potatoes will be cut down, and. 
those just coming out of the ground will not be hurt. 

Up to now the Peerless is the standard variety. Among the new kinds I have tried, I find 
the White Elephant to be a fine potato. It is a very strong grower, tubers oblong, very produc- 
tive, good quality and flavor. It is late, and will come in at the end of the season, if planted 
■with the earlier varieties. The Extra Early Vermont, Beauty of Hebron, Snowflake and Early 
Rose for earl}^ and Peerless and White Elephant for late, are as good varieties as exist, acditis 
not likely that we will have anything- better by new introductions. The Rural Blush, which I 
introduced some years ago, may be added to the late varieties; it is of excellent quality, strong; 




Snowllake. 



€0 



EICHAED FEOTSCHEE 5 ALMA>'AC A>'D GAEDEX ilA>*rAL 



groover and yields heavilT. Most people are not careful enongli in selecting their seed. Some 
of tlie potatoes sold in this market for seed are not fit for planting. 

small stalks, and if cut do^vn by frost, they 
suffer more than other varieties; hut they 
want rich, light soil to groTv to perfection, 
Breese's Peerfess, Several years 



Early Kose. This is, -nithont any donbt, 
the best potato for the table. It is oval, very 
shallo-w-eyed, pink-skinned, very dry, and 
mealy -^hen boiled. It has not become so 
popular as it deserves as a market variety, as 
pink or red potatoes do not sell so -n-ell here as 
the -white kinds. This variety should not be 
planted too soon, from, the fact that they make 



ago this variety was introduced, yet at present 
it is the leading kind for market as well as 
for family use. Skin dull white, sometimes 
slightly mssetted; eyes few and shallow, ronnd. 




"% 



./■ 



Rural yew Yorker No. 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



61 



occasionally oblong; grows to a large size; 
very productive and earlier than the Jackson 
"White. As white potatoes are more salable 
than pinkish kinds, and as this variety is 
handsome in appearance, and of good quality, 
it has become the general favorite in this 
section. 

Extra Early Vermont. Very similar 
to the Early Kose, but of a stronger growth; 
a little earlier, and the tubers are more uniform 
and larger. It is an excellent table variety. 

Snowflalte. This is a very early variety. 
Tubers good medium size, elongated, very 
uniform and quite productive. Eyes flat on 
the body of the tuber, but compressed on the 
seed end. Skin white, flesh very fine grained, 
and when boiled, snow white. 

Beauty of HeforoEi. I have tried this 
variety thoroughly and found it in every 
particular as has been represented. It is 
earlier than the Early Eose, which resembles 
it very much, being a little lighter and more 
russetted in color. It is very productive and 
of excellent table quality; more mealy than 
the Early Kose, but smaller. 

WSiite EBeplaaaat. _This variety has 
again given entire satisfaction. The tubers 
are large and of excellent quality; planted 
alongside of the Peerless, it prodviced fully one 
third more than that variety. 

Rural BImsS?. Second early, tubers 
roundish flattened, blush skin, flesh slighted 



with pink. Very dry and of excellent quality. 
A heavy yielder. 

Rural New Yorker No. 2. Novelty 
of last year. This potato is the nearest to 
perfection of any yet introduced, and exceeds 
all others in yield. They are of large size, 
very smooth skin; few eyes, distinct and 
shallow. Flesh very white, of excellent table 
quality. At the time of writing this, the crop 
has not been made, but I hope that it will be 
large, so the price will be such that it can be 
planted generally. 

T8»e TSiorburai!. This is one of the 
earliest potatoes introduced. It is of unex- 
celled quality, very productive. It is a seed- 
ling of the Beauty of Hebron which it resem- 
bles, but is earlier and more productive. 

Early ISuaiE'flSC, A variety of recent 
introduction. It is early and fairly productive. 
The tubers are medium, oblong and solid, 
uniform in shape and size. They are fit for 
the table when quite young. 




Kaiiv Saurit 



THE SWEET POTATO. 

Convolvulus Batatas. 

The Sweet Potato is next to corn the most important food crop in the South. They are a 
wholesome and nutritious diet, good for man and beast. Though cultivated to a limited extent 
on the sandy lands of New Jersey and some of the middle States, it thrives best on the light 
rich lands of the South, which bring their red and golden fruits to greatest perfection under 
the benign rays of a southern sun. It is a plant of a warm climate, a child of the sun, much 
more nutritious than the Irish Potato on account of the great amount of saccharine matter it 
contains, and no southern table should be found without it from the first day of August till the 
last day of May. Some plant early in spring the potato itself in the prepared ridges, and cut 
the vine from the potato when large enough, and plant them out; others start the potatoes in a 
bed prepared expressly for that purpose, and slip off the sprouts as they come up, and set these 
out. The latter method will produce the earliest potatoes; others w^ho set the vines, say that 
they make the largest tubers. In preparing the land the soil should be thoroughly pulverized, 
the ridges laid off about five feet apart, well drawn up and rather flat on top. If everything is 
ready, and time for planting has arrived, do not wait for a rain, make a paste of clay and cow 
manure; in this dip the roots of the shps and press the earth firmly around them. Old slips 
are more tenacious of life than young ones, and will under circumstances answer best. Watering 
afterwards, if dry weather continues, of course will be beneficial. Otherwise plant your vines 
ajid slips just before or after a rain. Two feet apart in the rows is considered a good distance. 
The ridges should never be disturbed by a plow from the time they are made until the potatoes 
are ready to be dug. 

Scrape off the grass and young weeds with the hoe, and pull up the large ones by hand. 
Crab grass is pecuharly inimical to the sweet potato, and should be carefully kept out of the 
patch. The vines should never be allowed to take root between the rows. Sweet potatoes 
should be dug before a heavy frost occurs; a very light one will do no harm. The earth should 
be dry enough to keep it from sticking to the potatoes. The old fashioned potato bank is the 
best arrangement for keeping them, the main points being a dry place and ventilation. 



62 



RICHA.ED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Forie^ies generally cuMivated in the South. 



Xlie l^am. Taking into consideration ■ 

quality and productiveness, the Yam stands at I 
the head of the list. Frequently, ^vhen baked, - 
the saccharine matter in the shape of candy j 
vrill be seen hanging to them in strings. Skin i 
and flesh yellow and very sweet. Without a | 
doubt, the best potato for family use. j 

Soutliern Queen. Very similar to j 
the former, but smoother, the tubers having | 
no veins or very few ;- it is earlier. i 



Shangrhai or California Fani. 

This is the earliest vaiiety we have, fi-equently, 
under favorable circumstances, giving good 
sized tubers two months after planting the 
Tine. Very productive, having given 300 
bushels per acre when planted early and on 
rich land. Is almost the only kind cultivated 
for the Xew Orleans market. Skin dull white 
or yellow, flesh white, dry and mealy, in large 
specimens frequently stringy. 



There are some other varieties of Sweet Potatoes highly prized in the "West, but not appre- 
ciated here. The Eed and Yellow Nansemond are of a fine quality and productive, but will 
not sell so well as the California Y'am, when taken to market. For home consumption they are 
fine, and deserve to be cultivated. 




Green Srriped Cashaw Crouk Neck. 

l^argre Clieese. This is of a bright 
orange, sometimes salmon color, fine grained, 
and used for table or for stock feeding. 

Caslia^v Croofe. ^""ecSi. This is very 
extensivelv cultivated in the South for table 



PUMPKIN. 

PoTTROx (Ft.,) Kuebiss (Ger.), 
Calabaza (Sp.). 

Kentucky Field. 

Znrge Cheese. 

Cashaw Crook Seek. (Green Striped.) 

Golden Yellow Mammoth. 

Are generally grown in the field, with 
the exception of the Cashaw which is 
planted in the garden; but great care 
must be taken not to plant them close 
to Squashes or Melons, as they will mix 
and spoil their quahty. Plant in hills 
from eight to twelve feet apai't. 

K.eiiCacky Field. Large round, 
soft shell, salmon color; very productive; 
best for stock. 

use. There are two kinds, one all yellow and 
the other green striped with light yellow color. 
The latter is the preferable kind; the flesh is 
fine grained, yellow, very sweet, and better 
than any "Winter Squash. It keeps well, it 




Golden Yellow Mammoth. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES, 



63 



takes the place here of the Winter Squashes, Ooldeii Yellow Manimotli. This 

which are very httle cultivated. The striped is a verj' large Pumpkin. Flesh and skin are 

variety has been cultivated here since a century of a bright golden color, fine grained and of 

and never was found North or West; since a good quahty. I had some brought to the store 

few years it has been brought out by Northern weighing one hundi-ed to one hundred and 

Seedsmen as ^'Japan Pie Pumpliiti." fifty pounds, raised on land which was not 

I had this kind grown alongside of the manured or fertilized. 
Southern Striped Cashaw, and found it one 
and the same. 

RADISH. 

Kadies, Kave (Fr.), Kadies, Eettig (Ger.), Rabano (Sp.). 
Ihrly Long Scarlet. | Scarlet Olive-shaped, White- Tipped or French 

Ghartier's Long. 
Early Scarlet Turnip. 
Golden Globe. 

Early Scarlet Olive-shaped. 
White Summer Turnip. 
Scarlet Half Long French. 

This is a very popular vegetable, and grown to a large extent. The ground for radishes 
should be rich and mellow. The early small varieties can be sown broad-cast among other 
crops, such as beets, peas, spinach, or where lettuce has been transplanted. Early varieties are 
sown in this section the whole year, but during summer they require frequent watering to make 
them grow quickly. The Golden Globe and White Summer Turnip are best for planting during 
the summer months. The Half Long Scarlet French is the only red kind raised for the New 
Orleans market, and all the other cities in the United States taken together do not use as many 
of that one variety as New Orleans does. I have sold nearly two thousand pounds of the seed 
per annum for the last twelve years. 



Breakfast. 
Black Spanish ( Winter). 
Chinese Bose ( Winter). 
White Sfrashurgh. 
White California Mammoth. 



Early Long- Scarlet. This is a very 
desirable variety; it is of a bright scarlet color; 
short top and very brittle. 

Cliartier's Long: Radish. A new 

long Radish, described as deep crimson colored 
at the top, shading off hghter, until at the 
bottom it becomes white. 

£arly Scarlet Turnip. A small, 
round variety, the favorite kind for family use. 
It is very early, crisp and mild when young. 

Oolden ^l9be. This stands the heat 
better than the foregoing kinds. It is of an 
oblong shape, and of a beautiful bright yellow 
color. It should be sown very thinly. Best 
adapted for summer and fall sowing. The 
variety I keep is of the finest strain, and as 
good as any ever sold. 

£arly Scarlet O 1 i v e - shaped. 

This is similar to the Half Long French, but 
shorter, and not quite so bright in color. It 
is early and of good quality. Top short. 

Tfhite Suntmer Turnip. This is 
a summer and fall variety. Oblong in shape, 
skin white, stands the heat well, but not much 
used. 

Scarlet Half Long: Frencli. 
This is the most popular Radish for the 
market. It is of a bright scarlet color, and 
when well grown, from two to three inches 
long, very brittle and tender. 

Scarlet Olive-shaped. White tipped, 
or French Breakfast. A handsome 
Radish of the same shape as the foregoing 
kind, with end and root white. Quite tender. 

Black Spanish. (Winteb.) This is 
sown, during fall and early winter. It is oval 



in shape, very solid, and stands considerable 
cold weather without being hurt. It can be 
sown broad-cast between Turnips, or planted 
in rows a foot apart, thinned out from three to 
four inches in the rows. 




Early Long Scarlet. 



64 



RICHAED FROToCHER S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 




Early Scarlet Turnip. 



Scarlet Half Loue French. 



Golden Globe. 



Chinese Kose. ("VVrN-TEK.) This is of 
a half long shape, bright rose color. It is as 
hardy as the last described kind, not so popular, 
but superior to the foregoing kind. Consider 
it the best printer variety, 

New Tl^liite Strasfowrgrli. A ne^r 
variety, of an oblong, tapering shape; the skin 
and flesh are pure -vrhite, firm, brittle and 
tender, and has the tendency of retaining its 
crispness even when the roots are old and 
large. It is a veiy good kind for summer use, 



as it -withstands the severe heat, and gro-ws 
ver\- cpiickly. The seed can be planted 
throughout the summer, and fine large roots 
will be rapidly formed. It is an excellent va- 
riety for family use, as well as for the market. 

^Vliite California ^laininotli. 

This is a Winter variety of large size, but can 
be sown here in early Spring. It is the largest 
of all Kadishes, and grows from 8 to 12 inches 
long. 2 to 3 in diameter. 



Sown fi-om September to ^March. 



ROQUETTE. 

EOQUETTE (Fr.j. 

It is used as a salad, resembling the Cress in taste. 



SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT. 

SAiszETS (Fr. ), Hafeewukzel (Ger. !, Ostka Vegetal (Sp.). 
American. \ Xew Sundicich Island (3Iammoth). 

A vegetable which ought to be more cultivated than it is. It is prepared in different ways. 
It partakes of the flavor of oysters. It should be sown in the fall of the year; not later than 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



65 



November. The ground ought to be manured the spring previous, deeply spaded, and well 
pulverized. Sow in drills about ten inches apart, and thin out from three to four inches in the 



American Salsify. This kind used 
to be generally cultivated; but since the intro- 
duction of the Sandwich Island Mammoth, the 
demand for it has decreased considerably. 

New Sandwicli Island SaBsify. 
(Mammoth.) This is a new sort which grows 



much quicker than the old varieties, it attains 
a large size ; can be called with right mammoth. 
It is very superior to the old kinds and should 
be generally cultivated. 



SPINACH. 

Epinaed (Fr.), Spinat (Ger.), Espinago (Sp.). 
Extra Large Leaved Savoy. \ Broad Leaved Flanders. 

A great deal of this is raised for the New Orleans Market, It is very popular. Sown from 
September to end of March. If the fall is dry and hot, it is useless to sow it, as the seeds 
require moisture and cool nights to make them come up. The richer the ground the larger the 
leaves. 



Extra ILiars:e L.eaved Savoy. The 

leaves of this variety are large, thick and a 
little curled. Very good for family use. 



Broad Leaved Flanders. This is 
the standard variety, both for market and 
family use. Leaves large, broad and very 
succulent. 



SORREL. 

OsEiLLE (Fr.), Sauerampfek (Ger,), Acedeea (Sp.). 
Planted in drills a foot apart, during the fall of the year; and thinned out from three to four 
inches in the drills. Sorrel is used for various purposes in the kitchen. It is used the same as 
Spinach; also, in soups and as a salad. 

SQUASH. 

Couege (Fr.), KiiEBiss (Ger.), Calabaza Tontaneea (Sp.). 



Early Bush, or Patty Pan. 

Long Green, or Summer Crook Neck. 



The Huhhard. 
Boston Marrow. 



Sow during March in hills from three to four feet apart, six to eight seeds. When well 
up, thin them out to three of the strongest plants. For a succession they can be planted as late 
as June. Some who protect by boxes, plant as soon as the first of February, but it is best to 
wait till the ground gets warm. When it is time to plant Corn, it is also time to plant Squash. 



Early Busti, or Patty Pan. Is 

the earhest and only popular kind here. All 
other varieties are very httle cultivated, as the 
Green Striped Cashaw Pumpkin takes their 



place. It is of dwarfish habit, grows bushy, 
and does not take much room. Quahty as 
good as any. 






Early Bush or Patty Pan. 
3 



Long Green or Summer Crook Neck. 



The Hubbard. 



66 



KICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Lrong: green, or Stiuimer Crook- 

Necli. This is a very strong grower, and 
continues in bearing longer than the first 
named kind. It is of good quality, but not so 
popular. 

Tlie IIllbl>ard. This is a Winter 
Squash, very highly esteemed in the East, but 
hardly cultivated here. It is, if |Dlanted here, 
inferior to the Southern StrijDed Cashavr 
Pumpkin which can be kept from one season 



I to another, and is superior in flavor to the 
! former kind. 

I S osto ai M arrow. Cultivated to a large 
extent North and East for winter use, where 

I it is used for custards, etc. It keeps for a 

i long time and is of excellent quality, but not 
esteemed here, as most people consider the 

I Southern grown Cashaw Pumpkin superior to 

i any Winter Squash, 



TOMATO. 

ToiiATE (Ft.), Liebesapfel (Ger.j, Tomate (Sp.). 
King of the Earlies. 
Extra mtrly Bicmf Bed. 
Horsford's Prelude. 
Bvcaii Champion. 
Trophy, (Selected.) 
Large Telloic. 

Seed should be sown in January, in hot-beds, or in boxes, which must be placed in a 
sheltered spot, or near windows. In March they can be sown in the open ground- Tomatoes 



Acme. 
Paragon. 

Livingston's Perfection. 
Livingston's Favorite. 
Livbigston's Beauty. 




King of the Earlies. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



67 



are generally sown too thick and become too crowded when two or three inches high, which 
makes the plants too thin and spindly. If they are transplanted when two or three inches high, 
about three inches apart each way, they will become short and sturdy, and will not snflt'er when 
planted into the open ground. Plant them from three to four feet apart. Some varieties can 
be planted closer; for instance, the Extra Early, which is of very dwarfish habit, two and a half 
feet apart is enough. 

They should be supported by stakes. When allowed to grow up wild, the fruit which 
touches the ground will rot. Eor a late or fall crop the seed should be sown towards the latter 
part of May and during June. 



King- of the Eai'Iies. This variety 
was introduced here by me three years ago. It 
is very early and productive; color bright red, 
of good size and quite solid. The vine is 
medium, stout and branching. The buds ap- 
pear soon, blossoms as a rule adhere and pro- 
duce fruit. It is so much earUer than the 
Livingston varieties, that it should be planted 
for the first. The latter varieties are so very 
handsome in shape, that they will sell better 



than any other, when the market is once well 
supplied. 

Extra EarSy I>warf. This is the 
earliest in cultivation. It is dwarfish in habit; 
fruit larger than the following kind, and more 
flat; bright scarlet in color and very productive. 
For an early market variety it cannot be sur- 
passed. 

Morsford's Freliade. Novelty of last 
year. This is a valuable variety on account of 




Horsford's Prelude. 



68 



RICHAKD TROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GAKDEN MANUAL 




Acme Tomato. 



Livingston's Favorite. 

being very early. The skin is 
very tough, and perfectly free 
from rot. Fruit meclinni in size. 
It is of excellent j9.ayor, specially 
adapted for forcing as "svell as 
outdoor culture. 

D^rarf Champion. A. 

new distinct variety. The plants 
grow stiff and upright, and need 
no support as other kinds. Can 
be planted closely together, three 
feet apart. It is early and pro- 
ductive; the fruit resembles the 
Acme; but is of lighter color, 
ripens up even and does not 
crack. "Where room is an object 
this sort is recommended. 

£arly Ijarge Siuooth 
Red. An early kind of medium 
size; smooth and productive. 

Selected Trophy. A 

very large, smooth Tomato, 
more sohd and heavier than any 
other kind. Has become a 
favorite variety. 

_ L-arge YeUow. This is 
similar in shape to the large Eed, 
but more solid. Not very popu- 
lar. 

Acme. This is one of the 
prettiest and most sohd Toma- 
toes ever introduced. It is of 
medium size, round and very 
smooth, a strong grower, and a 
good and long bearer. It is the 
jDerfection of Tomatoes for 
family use, but -will not answer 
for shipping purposes ; the skin 
is too tender, and cracks when 
fully ripe. Of all the varieties 
introduced, none has yet sur- 
passed this kind when all quah- 
ties are brought into considera- 
tion. It does weU about here 
where the ground is heavy. 

Parag^on. This variety 
has lately come into notice. 
It is very sohd, of a bright red- 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES 




Livingston's Beauty. 



70 



EICHAED FSOTSCHEE'S ALMANAC AXD GAEDEX ilAXUAL 



/^j^St 




Hi# 



^^^ 

'-^i 




disii crimson color, comes in about 
tlie same time as tLe Tilden, but is 
heavier in foliage, and protects its 
fiTiit. It is productive and keeps long 
in bearing. Well adapted for ship- 
ping. 

ILiiviEigstoii's Perfection. 

Very similar to the foregoing in shape 
and color. 

l.aviai§:§toii's Favorite. 

This Tomato ^as introduced only a 
few years ago; it is as perfect in shape 
and as solid as the Acme, but much 
larger, and of a handsome dark red 
color. I had some sent to me by a 
customer, and they surely vrere the 
finest sriecimen of tomatoes I ever 
s&vr, and Vere admired by everybody 
vrho saw them. They will keep weU, 
and do not crack. 

L<iviii§:ston's Beauty. This 

variety was offered for the first time 
five years ago. It is quite distinct in 
color, being a very glossy crimson with 
a light tinge of purple, (fighter than 
the Acmei. It ripens with the Acme 
or Paragon, but keeps longer. It is 
very perfect in shape and does not 
crack, like some of the thin skinned 
sorts. 



The seeds of the last five va- 
rieties are raised for me by the 
originators, Messrs. Livingston's 
Sons, and can be relied upon as 
being true to name and of su- 
perior quality. 



Paraguu. 

TURNIP. 

Xavet (Ft.), EiiBE (Ger.j, Xabo Comun (Sp.). 

Early Pied or Purple Top (strap-leaved). Golden Ball. 

Early White Flat Butch (strap-leaved). | Ajnber Globe. 

Purple Top Globe. \ Early Purple Top Munich. 

Large White Globe. j Improved Euta Baga. 

Pomerian Globe» \ Ettra Early White French, or White Egg 

White Spring. j Turnip. 

Yellow Aberdeen. j 

Turnips do best in new ground. "When the soil has been worked long, it should receive a 
top dressing of land-plaster or ashes. If stable manure is used the ground should be manured 
the spring previous to sowing, so it may be well incoi-porated with the soU. When fresh manure 
is used the turnips are apt to become speckled. Sow fi-om end of July till October for fall and 
winter, and in January. February and Mai'ch for spiing and summer use. They are generally 
sown broad-cast, but the Euta Baga should be sown in diills, or rather ridges, and should not 
be sown later than the end of August; the Golden Ball and Aberdeen, not later than the end of 
September. The White Flat Dutch, Early Spiing and Pomerian Globe are best for spring, but 
also good for autumn. 

Early Red or Purple Tos>. '• a bright purple top. The leaves are narrow 



(Stkap-Leavkd. ) This is one of the most popu- 
lar kinds. It is fiat, with a small tap-root, and 



and grow erect from the bulb, 
finely grained and rich. 



The flesh is 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



71 




Early ^Vhite Flat Butch. (Stbap- 
Leaved. ) This is similar to the above in shape, 
but considered about a week earher. It is 
very popular. 

Purple Top Olobe. A variety of 
recent introduction; same shape as the 
Pomerian Globe, but with purple top. Fine 
variety for table or for stock. It is not quite 
so early as the Early Eed or Purple Top. 1 
recommend it very highly. 

Itarge li¥hite €rlot>e. A very large 
variety, mostly grown for stock. It can be 



used for the table when young. Flesh coarse, 
but sweet; tops very large. 

Po^aeriau Olobe. This is selected 
from the foregoing. It is smoother and hand- 
somer in shape ; good to plant early in spring. 
When pulled before it is too large it is a very 
salable turnip in the market. 

IW^hBle Spring*. This is similar to the 
White Flat Dutch; not quite so large, but 
rounder in shape. The tops are larger; it is 
early, a good quality, and best adapted for 
spring planting. 



72 



EICHAED rROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Yello\*^ Aberdeen. This is a variety 
very little cultivated here. It is shaped like 
the Euta Baga, color yeUow with purple top. 
Good for table use or feeding stock. 

Robertson's Oolden Ball, is the 
best of the yellow Turnips for table use. It is 




very smooth, oval in shape, and of a beautiful 
orange color. Leaves are small. Should be 
sown in the faU of the year, and always in 
drills, so that the plants can be thinned out 
and worked. This kind ought to be more 
cultivated. 

_ Amber Olobe« This is very 
similar to the above kind. 

Extra Early Pnrple Top 

Munich. A new kind from Ger- 
many; flat, with red or purple top; 
same as the American variety, but 
fifteen days earlier to mature. It is 
very hardy, tender, and of fine flavor. 
Improved Purple Top 
Rut a Ba§:a. This is grown for 
feeding stock, and also for table use. 
It is oblong in shape, yellow flesh, 
very solid. Should always be sown 
in rows or ridges. 

Extra Early TFIiite 
French or l¥hite'Eg^g^ Tur- 
nip. This is a lately introduced 
variety; is said to be very early; ten- 
der and crisp. The shape of it is ob- 
long, resembling an egg. Having 
tried it, I found it as represented, 
quickly growing, tender and sweet. 
It will never become a favorite market 
variety, as only flat kinds sell well 
in this market. It has to be pulled 
up soon, as it becomes pithy shortly 
after attaining maturity. 



S^/^.fi:;^ 



Early White Flat Dutch [strap-leaved]. 




Munich Extra Early Purple Top, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



73 




Extra Early White French, or White Egg Turnip 



Improved Purple Top Ruta '. 



74 



EICHARD FEOTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



TOBACCO SEEDS. 

Imported Havana. I imported from one of the principal growers the finest and 
pnrest strain of Yuelto Abajo, -which is considered the best of the Havana varieties. 
Price, 10 cts. per package — 40 cts. per oz., $4.00 per lb. 
Connecticut Seed L<eaf. A well-known American yariety. 
Price, 10 cts. per package, — 25 cts. per oz., — $2.50 per lb. 



SWEET AND MEDICINAL HERBS. 



Some of these herbs possess culinary as well as medicinal properties. Shonld be found in 
every garden. Ground where they are to be sown should be well prepared and pulverized. Some 
of them have very fine seed, and it is only necessary, after the seed is sown, to press the ground 
with the back of the spade; if covered too deep they cannot come up. Early spring is the best 
time to sow them — some, such as Sage, Rosemary, Lavender and Basil, are best sown in a frame 
and afterwards transplanted into the garden. 



Anise, PimpineUe Anisum. 

Balm, Melisse Officinalis. 

Basil, large and small leaved. 

BasiUcum. 
Bene, Sesamum Orientak. 
Borage, Borago Officinalis. 
Caraway, Carum Cami. 
Dill. Anethum Graveolens. 
Fennel, sweet, Anethum Foeniculum. 



Ocyr 



Lavender, Lavendula Vera. 
Marjoram, sweet, Origanum Mayoram. 
Pot Marigold, Gikndula Officinalis. 
Eosemary, Rosemary Officinalis. 
Eue, Ruta Graveolens. 
Sage, Salvia Offiicinalis. 
Summer Savory, Sat>ureja Horterisis. 
Thyme, Thymixs Vulgaris. 
"Wormwood, Artemisia Absinthium. 



GRASS AND FIELD SEEDS 



I have often been asked what kind of Grass Seed is the best for this latitude, but so far 
I have never been able to answer this question satisfactorily. For hay I do not think there is 
anything better than the ]\Iillet. For permanent grass I have almost come to the conclusion 
that none of the grasses used for this purpose North and West will answer. Barley, Eye, Eed 
Oats and Eescue Grass will make winter pasturage in this latitude. Different kinds of Clover 
answer very well during spring, but during the hot summer months I have never found any- 
thing to stand and produce, except the Bermuda and Crabgrass, which are indigenous to the 
South 

Of late years the Lespedeza Striata, or Japan Clover, has been sown extehsiYely, a descrip- 
tion of which will be found on page 81. 

The Bermuda, in my opinion, is better suited for pasturage than hay, as it is rather short 
and hard when cured. Having tried Guinea Grass I have come to the conclusion that it wiU 
not answer here, from the fact that it will freeze out every year. It will produce a large 
quantity of hay or green fodder, but has to be resown every spring. The seeds that are raised 
here are light, and do not germinate freely. To import seed every year is rather troublesome. 
The Johnson Grass advertised by some as Guinea Grass, is not Guinea Grass: it is much 
coarser, and can hardly be destroyed after having taken hold of a piece of ground. Some are 
enthusiastic about Alfalfa or Lucerne; others, whose opinion also ought to be respected, say it 
will not do here. There exists a great difference of opinion in regard to which grass seed is the 
most suitable for the South. 



Red Clover, Should be sown either 
during fall or early in spring. Six to eight 
IDOunds to an acre. 

TTliite I>utcli Clover. A grass sown 
for pasturage at the rate of four to sis: pounds 
to the acre. Should be sown in fall and early 
spring. 

Alfalfa or Chili Clover, or 
French JLucerne. This variety does 
well here, but the ground has to be well pre- 
pared and deeply plowed. It will not do in 



low wet ground. Should be sown in the fall 
of the year, or January and February; eight 
to ten pounds per acre. This being of special 
value I refer to the letter written by E. iL 
Hudson on the subject. (See latter part of 
this Almanac. ) 

Kentucky Blue Grass. iFxtea 
Ct.f.axed.) Should be sown in dry soil. Two 
bushels per acre. See page 78. 

]TIeado\v Fescue, Fesiuca pratensis. 
As a pasture grass I consider this one of the 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



75 



most valuable. It is not affected by dry 
weather, as its roots penetrate the earth 12 to 
15 inches; it is much relished by all kinds of 
stock on account of its long and tender leaves. 
It yields a very superior hay when cured. It 
has been gi-own very Uttle in this country and 
is deserving of much more attention. Sow in 
spring or fall. Two bushels to the acre. In 
some sections it is called Randall Grass. This 
should not be confounded with the English 
Eye Grass, offered by some dealers as the 
same variety. 

Orchard Orass. This is one of the 
best grasses for pasturing. It grows quickly, 
much more so than the Blue Grass. Can be 
sown either in fall or spring. Sow one to one 
and a half bushels per acre, (See extract from 
"Farmers' Book of Grasses.") 

Rescue Grass. A forage plant from 
Australia. It grows during winter. Sow the 




seed in the fall of the year, but not before the 
weather gets cool, as it will not sprout so 
long as the ground is warm. Sow 1 i bushels 
seed to the acre. 

Mung'arian Orass. This is a valuable 
annual forage plant, and good to make hay. 
Sow three pecks to the acre. It should be 
cut when in bloom. 

Oerman Millet. Of all the Millets 
this is the best. It makes good hay, and pro- 
duces heavily. Three pecks sown to the acre 
broad-cast secures a good stand. Can be sown 
from April till June, but the former month is 
the best time. Should be cut the same as the 
foregoing kind. 

Rye. Is sown during the fall months as 
late as December, for forage ; and for pasturage, 
during winter and spring. 

Barley, Fall. Can be sown fall and 
winter, but requires strong, good soil. Used 
here for forage during its green state. 

Texas Med or Rust Proof Oats. 

It is only a few years since these oats have 
come into general cultivation. They are very 
valuable, and will save a great deal of corn on 
a farm. The seed of this variety has a red- 
dish cast, and a peculiar long beard, and is 
very heavy. It is the only kind which will 
not rust in the Southern climate. They can 
be sown as early as October, but should be 
pastured down as soon as they commence to 
joint, tUl February. "When the ground is low. 




White Dutch Clover. 



Alfalfa or Lucerne Clover, 



76 



EICHARD FEOTSCHEE 8 ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 





x::^^ 




Meadow Fescue Grass. 



Aniber ^orehum. 



or the season -^et, this cannot well be done 
withoTit destroying the whole crop. During 
January and Februai-y is the proper time, if 
no pasturing can be done. One to one and a 
half bushels per acre is sufficient. These oats 
have a tendency to stool, and therefore do not 
require as much per acre as common oats. 
Those who have not already tried this yaiiety 
should do so. 

Sorg'bum. Is planted for feeding stock 
during the spring and early summer. For 
this purpose it should be sown as early in 
spring as possible in drills about two to three 
feet apart; three to four quarts per acre. It 
makes excellent green fodder. 

I>honro, or £:g:yptiaii Corn. 

Sorghum Tulgare. This is a well known cereal. 
It produces a large quantity of seed, of which 
fowls and animals are foncL — Can also be sown 
broad-cast, for soiling or in drills for fodder 
and seed. If sowed in drills, one peck of seed 
per acre is ample. If sown broad-cast, one 
bushel per acre. For grain, the stalks should 



not be nearer than 10 inches in the drill, but 
if to be cut repeatedly for soiling, it is better 
to sow- quit« thickly in the hills. Seed should 
not be sown too early, and covered from one 
half to one inch. If too much rain in the 
Spring, the seed will not come weU; — they 
require more heat than the other Sorghums, 
Eural Branching Sorghum or ]Millow Maize 
produces the seed heads upright in a rertical 
position, while the others are dropping. The 
seeds are smaller, but will keep longer than the 
other varieties. The stalk grows very large and 
produces a good many large leaves. It suckers 
and tillers more and more the oftener it is cut. 
It exceeds greatly in yield of green fodder any 
of the famihar fodder plants, exce^Dt the 
"Teosinte." — It should be planted exclusively 
in drills four feet apart, 18 to 20 inches in the 
driUs. 

Broom Corn. Can be planted the 
same as corn, put the hiUs closer together in 
the row. Six quarts "will plant an acre. 



The following extracts have been taken, by permission from the author. Dr. D. L. Phares, 
from his book, "Farmers' Book of Grasses." It is the most valuable work of the kind ever 
pubhshed in the South, and should be in the hands of every one who takes an interest in the 
cultivation of grasses. 

Copies for sale at pubHsher's price. Paper covers, 25 cents; Cloth, 35 cents; postage paid. 



ORCHARD CRASS. 

(JDactylis Glomeraia.) 

Of all the grasses this is one of the most -widely diffused, growing in Africa, Asia and every 
■country in Europe and all our States. It is more highly esteemed and commended than any 
other grass, by a larger number of farmers in most countries — a most decided proof of its gi-eat 
Talue and wonderful adaptation to many soils, climates and treatments. Yet, strange to say, 
though gi'owing in England for many centuries it was not appreciated in that country till 
car*ried there fi'om Virginia in 1764:. But, as in the case of Timothy, soon after its introduction 
from America, it came into high favor among farmers, and still retains its hold on their esti- 
mation as a grazing and hay crop. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



77 



Nor is this strange when its many ad- 
vantages and points of excellence are con- 
sidered. It will grow well on any soil 
containing sufficient clay and not holding 
too much water. If the land be too tena- 
cious, drainage will remedy the soil; if 
worn out, a top dressing of stable manure 
will give it a good send-off, and it wiU 
furnish several good mowings the first year. 
It grows well between 29° and 48° lati- 
tude. It may be mowed from two to four 
times a year, according to the latitude, 
season and treatment; yielding from one 
to three tons of excellent hay per acre on 
poor to medium land. In grazing and as 
hay, most animals select it in preference 
among mixtures in other grasses. In lower 
latitudes it furnishes good winter grazing, 
as v;ell as for spring, summer and fall. 
After gi'azing, or mowing, few grasses grow 
so rapidly (three or six inches per week), 
and are so soon ready again for tooth or 
blade. It is easily cured and handled. It 
is readily seeded and catches with certainty. 
Its long, deeply penetrating, fibrous roots 
enable it to sustain itself and grow 
vigorously during droughts that dry up 
other grasses, except tall oat grass, which 
has similar roots and characteristics. It 
grows well in open lands and in forests of 
large trees, the underbrush being all clear- 
ed off. I have had it grown luxuriantly even 
in beech woods, where the roots are super- 
ficial, in the crotches of roots and close to 
the trunks of trees. The hay is of high 
quality, and the young grass contains a 
larger per centage of nutritive digestable 
matter than any other grass. It thrives 
well without any renewal on the same 
ground for thirty -five, nay forty years; 
how much longer, I am not able to say. 
It is easily exterminated when the land is 
desired for other crops. Is there any other 
grass for which so much can be said? 




Orchard Grass. 



RED TOP CRASS. 

(Agrostis Vulgaris.) 



This is the best grass of England, the herd 
grass of the Southern States; not in honor of 
any man, but probably, because so well adapt- 
ed to the herd. It is called also Fine Top, 
Burden's and Borden's Grass. Varying greatly 
in characters, according to soil, location, 
climate and culture, some botanists have 
styled it A. Polymorpha. It grows two to 
three feet high, and I have mown it when 
four feet high. It grows well on hill tops 
and sides, in ditches, gullies and marshes, 
but delights in moist bottom land. It is not 
injured by overflows, though somewhat pro- 
longed. In marshy land it produces a vei-y 
dense, strong network of roots capable of sus- 
taining the weight of men and animals walking 
over it. 



It furnishes considerable grazing during- 
warm "spells" in winter, and in spring and 
summer an abundant supply of nutrition. It 
has a tendency, being very hardy, to increase 
in density of growth and extent of siirf ace, and 
will continue indefinitely, though easily sub- 
dued by the plow. 

Cut before maturing seed, it makes a good 
hay and large quantity. It seems to grow 
taller in the Southern States than it does 
further North, and to make more and better 
hay and grazing. Red Top and Timothy, 
being adapted to the same soil and maturing 
at the same time, do well together and produce 
an excellent hay. But the Red Top will finally 
root out Timothy, and if pastured much it wiU 
do so sooner. 



78 



EICHAED FEOTSCHEE's ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



Sow about two bushels (28 lbs.) per acre, 
if alone, in September, October, Febrtiary, 
or March; if ^^itli Timothy for hay, from 
€ to 10 pounds; if with other grasses for 
pasture, 3 to 5 pounds. It is an excellent 
pasture grass, and will grow on almost any 
Mad of soil 



KENTUCKY BLUE CRASS. 

(Foa Praiensis. ) 

This is also called smooth meadow grass, 
spear grass, and green gi-ass, all three very 
appropriate, characteristic names. But 
Elue is a misnomer for this grass. It is 
not blue, but green as gi-ass, and the 
greenest of grasses. The P. compressa, 
jiat-stalked meadow grass, wire grass, blue 
grass is blue, 'the true blue' grass from 
which the genus received its trivial name. 
Kentucky blue grass, known also in the 
Eastern States as June grass, although 
esteemed in some parts of America as the 
best of all pasture grasses, seems not to be 
considered very valuable among Enghsh 
farmers esceiDt in mixtures. It is certainly 
a very desirable pasture grass however. • 
Its veiy narrow leaves, one, two or more 
feet long, are in such profusion, and cover 
the ground to such depth with their luxu- 
riant growth, that a mere description could 
give no one an adequate idea of its beauty, 
quantity, and value; that is on rich land. 
On poor, sandy land, it degenerates sadly, as 
do other things uncongenially located. 

Perennial, and bearing 
cold and di'ought well, 
it furnishes grazing a 
large part of the year. 
It is specially valuable 
as a winter and spring 
grass for the South. To 
secure the best winter 
results, it should be 
allowed a good growth 
in early faU, so that the 
ends of the leaves, being 
killed by the frost, 
afford an ample covering 
for the under-part which 
continue to grow all 
winter, and afford a good 
bite whenever required 
by sheep, cattle, hogs 
and horses. In pro- 
longed summer drought 
it dries completely, so that, if fired, it would 
burn off clean. But this occurs in Kentucky, 
where indeed it has seemed without fire, to 
disappear utterly; yet, when rain came, the 
bright green spears promptly recarpeted the 
earth. 

"STith its underground stems and many roots, 
it sustains the heat and drought "^of the 
Southern States as weU as those of Kentucky, 
where indeed it is subjected to severer trial s 
of this kind than in the more Southern States. 





Kentuckv Blue Grass. 



Red Top Grass. 

In fa<;t, it bears the vicissitudes of our cUmate 
about as well as Bermuda grass, and is nearly 
as nutritious. 

Blue grass grows well on hill tops, or bottom 
lands, if not too wet and too poor. It may 
be sown any time from September to Apiil, 
preferably perhaps in the latter half of Febru- 
ary, or early in March. The best catch I ever 
had was sown the 20th of March, on unbroken 
land, from which trash, leaves, etc., had just 
been burned. The surface of the land should 
be cleaned of trash of all kinds, smooth, even; 
and if recently plowed and harrowed, it should 
be rolled also. The last proceeding is for com- 
pacting the surface in order to prevent the 
seed from sinking too deep in the ground. 
Without harrowing or brushing in, many of 
them get in too deep to come up, even when 
the surface of the land has had the roller over 
it. The first rain after seeding will put them 
in deep enough, as the seeds are very minute, 
and the sjDears of grass small as fine needles, 
and therefore unable to get out from under 
heavy cover. These spears are so small as to 
be invisible, except to close examination; and 
in higher latitudes, this condition continues 
through the first year. Thus, some who have 
sown the blue grass seed, seeing the first year 
no grass, imagine they have been cheated, 
plant some other crop, and probably lose what 
close inspection would have shown to be a good 
catch. This, however, is not apt to occur in 
the Southern tier of States, as the growth here 
is more rapid. The sowing mentioned above 
made on the 20th of March, came up prompt- 
ly, and in three months the grass was from six 
to ten inches high. One year here gives a 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



79 



finer growth and show than two in Kentucky, 
or any other State so far North, 



Sown alone, 20 to 26 pounds, that is 2 bushels, 
should be used; in mixtures, 4 to 6 pounds. 



ENGLISH OR PERENNIAL RYE CRASS. 

(Lolium Perenne. ) 



This is the 
first grass culti- 
vated in Eng- 
land over two 
centuries ago, 
and at a still 
more remote 
period in 
France. It was 
long more 
widely known 
and cultivated 
than any other 
grass, became 
adapted to a 
great variety of 
English Rye Grass. soils and con- 

ditions, and a 
vast number (seventy or more) of varieties 
produced, some of which were greatly im- 
l^roved, while others were inferior and became 
annuals. Introduced into the United States 
in the first quarter of the current century, it 
has never become very popular, although 




shown by the subjoined analysis of Way not 
to be deficient in nutritive matter. In 100 
parts of the dried grass cut in bloom were 
albuminoids 11.85, fatty matters 3.17, heat- 
producing principles 42. 24, wood fibre 35.20, 
ash 7.54. The more recent analysis of Wolfl: 
and Knopp, allowing for water, gives rather 
more nutritive matter than this. 

It grows rapidly, and yields heavy crops of 
seed; makes good grazing, and good hay. But, 
as with all the Rye grasses, to make good hay, 
it must be cut before passing the blossom 
stage, as after that it deteriorates rapidly. 
The roots being short, it does not bear drought 
well, and exhausts the soil, dying out in a few 
years. In these respects it is liable to the same 
objections as Timothy. The stem, one to two 
feet high, has four to six purplish joints and 
as many dark green leaves; the flexious spiked 
panicle, bearing the distant spikelets, one in 
each bend. 

It should be sown in August or September, 
at the rate of twenty-five or thirty pounds, or 
one bushel seed per acre. 



TALL MEADOW OAT CRASS. 

( Arrhenatherum Avenaceum. ) 



Evergreen grass in Virginia, and other 
Southern States, and it is the Tall Oat (Avena 
elatior) of Linaius. It is closely related to the 
common oat, and has a beautiful open panicle, 
leaning slightly to one side. , ' 'Spikelets two 
flowered, and a rudiment of a third, open; 
lowest flower staminate or sterile, with a long 
bent awn below the middle of the back." — 
(Flint.) 

It is widely naturalized and well adapted to 
a great variety of soils. On sandy, or gravelly 
soils, it succeeds admirably, growing two or 
three feet high. On rich, dry upland it grows 
from five to seven feet high. It has an 
abundance of perennial, long fibrous roots, 
penetrating deeply in the soil, being, therefore, 
less affected by drought or cold, and enabled 
to yield a large quantity of foliage, winter and 
summer. These advantages render it one of 
the very best grasses for the South, both for 
grazing (being evergreen) and for hay, ad- 
mitting of being cut twice a year. It is 
probably the best winter grass that can be 
obtained. 

It will make twice as much hay as Timothy, 
and containing a greater quantity of albumi- 
noids and less of heat-producing principles, it 
is better adapted to the uses of the Southern 
farmer, while it exhausts the surface soil less, 
and may be grazed indefinitely, except after 
mowing. To make good hay it must be cut 
the instant it blooms, and, after being cut. 



must not get wet by dew or rain, w^hich 
damages it greatly in quality and appearance. 

For green soiling, it may be cut four or five 
times with favorable seasons. In from six to 
ten days after blooming, the seeds begin to 
ripen and fall, the 
upper ones first. It 
is, therefore, a little 
troublesome to 
save the seed. As 
soon as those at the 
top of the panicle 
ripen sufficientlyto 
begin to drop, the 
heads should be cut 
off and dried, when 
the seeds will all 
thresh out readily 
and be matured. . 
After the seeds are 
ripe and taken off, 
the long abundant 
leaves and stems 
are still green, and 
being mowed make 
good hay. 

It may be sown 
in March or April, 
and mowed the 
same season; but 
for heavier yield, it 
is better to sow in Tall Meadow Oat Grass. 




80 



EICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



September or October. Along the more south- 
ernly belt, from the 31 ° parallel southward, it 
may be sown in November and onward till the 
middle of December. Whenever sown it is one 
of the most certain grasses to have a good 
catch. Not less than two bushels (24 pounds) 



per acre should be sown. Like Timothy, on 
inhospitable soils, the root may sometimes be- 
come bulbous. The average annual nutrition 
yielded by this grass in the Southern belt, is 
probably twice as great as in Pennsylvania 
and other Northern States. 



JOHNSON O^ASS. 

(Sorghum halapense. ) 



This has been called Cuba grass, Egyptian 
grass. Means gi'as's, Alabama and Guinea 
grass, etc. 

It seems pretty well agreed now however, to 
call it Johnson grass, and leave the name 
Guinea grass for the Fanicum jumentorum, to 
which it properly belongs. 

It is true that in Mr. Howard's pamphlet, 
as well as in many periodicals and books, and 
in letters and common usage, this grass has 
been far more generally called Guinea grass 
than the true Guinea grass itself, thus causing 
vast confusion. It is, therefore, assuredly 
time to call each by its right name. Johnson 
grass is perennial and has cane-like roots, or 
more j)roperly, underground stems, from the 
size of a goose-quiU to that of the little finger. 
These roots are tender, and hogs are fond of 
and thrive on them in winter. The roots 
literally fill the ground near the surface, and 
every joint is capable of developing a bud. 
Hence the grass is readily propagated from 
root cutting. It is also propagated from the 
seeds, but not always so certainly; for in 
some localities many faulty seeds are produced, 
and in other places no seeds are matured. 
Before sowing the seeds, therefore, they should 
be tested, as should all grass seeds indeed, in 
order to know what proportion will germinate, 
and thus what quantity per acre to sow. One 
bushel of a good sample of this seed is suffi- 
cient for one acre of land. 

The leaf, stalk and panicle of this grass 
resemble those of other sorghums. It grows 
on any land where corn will grow; and like the 
latter, the better the land the heavier the crop. 
On rich land the culms attain a size of over 
half an inch in diameter, and a height of seven 
feet. It should be cut while tender, and then 
all live stock are fond of it; for a few weeks 
are sufficient to render it so coarse and hard 
that animals refuse it, or eat sparingly. 

A few testimonials are here quoted to give an 



idea of the productiveness and value of this 
plant. In a letter published in the Eural 
CaroUnicm for 1874, Mr. N. B, Moore, who had 
for more than forty years grown crops, speaks 
of this grass under the name of Guinea grass : 

"My meadow consists of one hundred acres 
of alluvial land, near Augusta. * * * In winter 
I employ but four men, who are enough to 
work my packingpress; in summer, when 
harvesting, double that number. In autumn 
I usually scarify both ways with sharp, steel- 
toothed harrows, and sow over the stubble a 
peck of red clover per acre, which, with 
volunteer vetches, comes off about the middle 
of May. The second yield of clover is 
uniformly eaten up by grasshoppers. The top 
roots remain to fertilize the then coming 
Guinea grass, which should be but from two 
to three feet high. * * * On such land as 
mine, it will afford three or four cuttings if the 
season is propitious. I use an average of five 
tons of gypsum soon after the first cutting, 
and about the same quantity of the best 
commercial fertilizers, in March and April. 
* * * The grass, which is cut before noon, is 
put up with horse sulky rakes, in cocks, be- 
fore sun-down," 

Mr Moore's income from this field was from 
seven thousand to ten thousand dollars a year. 

Mr. Goelsel, of Mobile, says: "It is un- 
doubtedly the most profitable soiling plant yet 
introduced, and also promises to be the plant 
for our Southern hay stacks, provided it can 
be cut every three or four weeks." 

Note. — Eecognizing all the above, I would 
say, that great care must be taken not to sow 
this grass near cultivated lands. If done so, it 
should not be allowed to go to seed, as the 
wind will blow them off from the stalks, and 
when it gets amongst cane or other crops it 
causes a great deal of trouble. It is almost 
impossible to get it out of the land. 



RESCUE CRASS. 

( Ceratochloa austraUs or Bromus Schraderii. ) 



It is an annual -ranter gTass. It varies in 
the time of starting growth. I have seen it 
ready for mowing the first of October and 
furnish frequent cuttings till April. Again, it 
may not start before January, nor be ready to 
cut till February. This depends upon the 
moisture and depression of temperature. "VVTien 
once started, its growth, after the successive 
cuttings or grazings, is very rapid. It is tender, 



very sweet, and stock eat it greedily. It makes 
also a good hay. It produces an immense 
quantity of leaves. On loose soil some of it 
may be pulled out by animals grazing it. I 
have seen it bloom as early as November when 
the season had favored it, and no gi-azing or 
cutting were permitted. Oftener it makes 
little start before January But whether late 
or early starting, it may be grazed or mowed 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



81 



frequently, until April, it still will mature seed. It has become 
naturalized in limited portions of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Alabama, and perhaps other States. It is a very pretty grass in 
all its stages ; and especially so when the culms, two or three feet 
high, are gracefully bending the weight of the diffuse panicle 
with its many pedicelled flattened spikelets, each an inch or 
more long and with twelve to sixteen flowers. 

I would not, however, advise sowing this grass on poor land 
with the expectation of getting a remunerative return. It tillers 
abundantly under favorable conditions. 

JAPAN CLOVER. 

(Lespedeza Striata.) 

There is now so much enquiry about this plant, so much con- 
fusion, lack of knowledge and confounding with or mistaking for 
it another worthless species, and also the same errors in regard to 
a small genuine clover, that it is deemed proper to give some 
correct information on the subject. 




Rescue Grass. 



To botanists this plant has been known for 
manj' generations in its native habitat in China 
and other eastern parts of Asia. Finding its 
way to Japan it encountered congenial chmate 
and soil, and rapidly spread over the entire 
country occupying all waste places, which it 
has continued to possess and improve for 
much more than a century. Here as on the 
continent, it was of dwarfish habit and received 
a name indicative of the fact. 

Finally a few seeds, arriving in the United 
States, germinated, contested a few feet of 
soil with other native and exotic j)lants that 
had long pre-occupied the land. 

It gained strength and increased in yield of 
seed till becoming somewhat abundant, it 
commenced its westward invasion, simultane- 
ously extending its conquests northward and 
southward, firmly holding aU conquered 
territory. Since 1870 its strides westward have 
been immense. It now .extends from the 
Atlantic seaboard across the Mississippi, and 




Japan Clover. 



its out-posts are pushed far towards the 
western border of Texas. 

Denuded, soil-less hill tops, sandy plains, 
gravelly slopes, bottoms and banks of washes 
and gullies, pine thickets, open woods, fields, 
dry and damp soils, all seem as if specially 
created for its home. It seizes upon all with 
equal facility. 

It maintains its dwarfish habit on sands, 
gravels and other spots too poor to produce 
any other vegetation, densely covering the 
surface with its green robe and afl:ording 
delighted live stock with delicious nutritious 
grazing for four to eight months of the year. 
But on richer soils it dofi:s the dwarf and dons 
the tree style justifying the American name of 
"bush-clover," sending its long tap root deep 
down in the subsoil and its stem two to three 
feet up into the light and air, with its many 
branches thickly set with leaves, inviting tooth 
and blade. 

It attains here on rich or medium soil 
protected from live stock a magnitude that 
could not have been imagined by one seeing 
it in its far eastern home. It takes possession 
not only of unoccupied land and pine thickets 
but grows among sedges, grasses, briers and 
weeds, completely eradicating many species of 
noxious grasses and weeds. It subdues even 
broom grass and holds equal contest with 
Bermuda grass; in some localities one yielding, 
in other localities the other succumbing, while 
in other spots both maintain equal possession; 
or one year one may seem to rule, and the 
next year the other. 

VALUE. 

On sands, gravels, or denuded clay hill tops 
no other plant known to me is so valuable for 
grazing. Taking a succession of ten years, 
the same assertion would not be far out of the 
way for rich lands w^hile few forage plants on 
these would yield so much or so valuable hay. 

The analysis of red clover gives 16 i^er cent, 
albuminoids and 41 carbohydrates. The average 
of two analyses of Japan clover gives 15.85 
albuminoids and 56 carbohydrates, placing it 
above red clover in nutritive value. It is 



82 



EICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



STJPEKIOB TO OTHEB FOKAGE PLANTS 

in seyeral important particulars not generally 
observed by tlie careless stock-man. 1. The 
growing plant contains less moisture than any 
other very valuable forage plant vrith perhaps 
a. single exception. Hence we never hear of 
animals having hoven or bloat or scours from 
eating this plant as when they have fi-ee access 
to red clover, peas and many grasses. 2, We 
have never yet found on the Japan Clover 
any fungous growths which are so common on 
other plants as to cause many deaths annually 
among animals grazing on them or fed with 
the hay. 3. Hea^^y grazing for a few weeks 
destroys the clovers, lucerne and most of the 
grasses, while this plant may be grazed how- 
ever closely, vv'hether the season be wet or 
prolonged drouth prevail, without damage. 4. 
There is less difficulty of obtaining a catch 
with this plant than most others. The seed 
may be scattered on bare, poor, barren ground, 
rich soil, among weeds and dead gi-ass or in 
March on small grain sown the previous 
autumn or -vsdnter and a catch will be obtained. 

5. The grain being harvested when ripe does 
not injure the Lespedeza; which is ready for 
the mower through September and October. 

6. It is more easily cured than the clovers, 
pea vines aiid many grasses. 7. It does not 
lose the foliage in curing as do clovers, peas 
and some other plants. 8. It furnishes good 
grazing from May, some years last of March 
till killed by frost in October or November. 

PEODUCT OF HAT. 

On medium to good land it ranges from 
one to three tons per acre; and this may be 
obtained after having during the summer har- 
vested from the same land a good crop of grain 
and straw. 

QUALITY. 

Some of our farmers, who have been moving 
Lespedeza striata for live to ten years regard 
it as the soundest, best, most wholesome and 
palatable hay they ever used. These moTsdngs 
have ranged from two to three hundi-ed tons on 
single farms in one season. Yet no complaint 
as to quality, or relish of animals for it, or as 
to its nutritive value and good effect on the i 
stock has ever reached us. Those who have 
used it longest and in largest quantities and 
kept animals — cattle, sheep, horses and mules 
■ — in best condition commend it most. We 
have now before us a beautiful sample of this 
hay fi'om Louisiana being from a crop of per- 
haps 300 tons movN-ed last autumn. 

SEEDING. 

A measured half bushel of seed per acre may 



be sown broad-cast the first week in March 
south of parallel 32 ^ of latitude, a few days 
later as we proceed northward for each degree 
or two. Sown in the fall or winter it springs 
up, but freezes often throw it out and destroy 
it. As already stated it germinates and grows 
well on land in any condition, if the surface 
is not so loose as to let the seed sink too deep. 
"WTien land has been prepared for or sown in 
grain, the winter rains put it in about the best 
condition for growing this plant for heavy crops 
of hay. 

All our remarks on this plant, as found in 
our Southern States, are based on what we 
have seen and learned of it in a belt lying be- 
tween 305^ and 34^ of latitude. 

The only 

COMPLETE PEOOF 

of the value of a forage plant is found in the 
concurrence of chemical analysis and the 
observation and experience of the stockman. 
When the relish of an animal for the forage is 
keen, the health preserved and improved, 
growth promoted, a maximum quantity of 
excellent beef or mutton or pork, and, if 
superior, milk and butter, are obtained, we 
certainly have an admirable food plant. The 
judgment of the cow, the convictions of the 
farmer arising from his experiences indepen- 
dent of, and indeed in utter ignorance of any 
chemical analysis, confirming the decisions of 
the chemist, give us the best of all evidences 
of the value of forage. And all these we have 
in this case. Japan clover is also a great 

AMELIOEATOE AITO FEETTLIZEE. 

Its abundant long tap-roots decaTying render 
the soil porous and leave in it much nitro- 
genous material and humus. It releases and 
brings up from the subsoil valuable plant food; 
the ashes containing nearly 40 per cent, 
potash, 29.60 oxide hme, 7.82 sulphuric acid, 
7.54 phosphoric acid — all most valuable ele- 
ments in plant life and growth. Soils are thus 
renovated, slopes prevented from washing, 
gullies filled, moisture solicited and retained, 
atmospheric fertilizers gathered and garnered; 
bald, barren wastes covered -^ith living green 
to fill the stomach, dehght the eye and cheer 
the heart. 

It should have been stated that this plant 
has eradicated over large areas the much 
detested heienium or bitter weed, which so 
often damages the flavor of the milk of cows 
eating it while grazing. It is believed that it 
exterminates also two or three j^lants that are 
fatally poisonous to cattle and horses. 

For price see price hst. 



This variety of clover was brought from 
Chili to California, and thence to the States, 
under the name of California Clover. It is 
often taken for Lucerne, which name is wi-ong- 
ly apphed. The Burr Clover has only two or 
three yellow blossoms in each cluster, while 
Lucerne has many blue blossoms in an 
elongated head. It fumisheB good grazing from 



BURR CLOVER 

{Medicago Maculatu. ) 



February till April or ]May. It is good for 
grazing and hay. As there is no way for 
removing the seeds from the pods of spotted 
medic, it is necessary to sow the burr hke 
pods, say one-half bushel per acre. The 
planting should be done early in fall, so the 
pods may have time to rot and release the 
seeds. Should be covered very lightly. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



83 



BERMUDA CRASS, 

{Oynodon Dadylon.) 



' Almost everybody living in this section of 
the country knows this gi-ass; it is planted as 
a Lawn grass, and nothing will stand the snn 
better, or will make a prettier carpet, when 
kept short, than this grass. It is only lately 
that I have been able to obtain the seed of this 
grass, which heretofore had to be propagated 
by the roots. Six pounds will sow an acre. 



Should be planted in spring, but can also be 
sown later. Under the most favorable circum- 
stances it takes from 20 to 25 days to sprout; 
requires damp weather and hot sun; but when 
once up it grows very rapidly. 

Price, $1.50 per lb.; in lots of 10 lbs. and 
over, $1.25 per lb. 



DIRECTIONS FOR PLANTING 



The directions given here are for the Southern part of Louisiana. If applied to localities 
North of here, the time of planting will not be quite so early in spring, and earlier in fall. For 
instance: the directions for January will answer for February in the Northern part of this State, 
and Southern part of Mississippi or Arkansas. In autumn, directions for September can be 
followed in August In those sections very little can be planted in November and December. 



JAI^UARY, 



Sow -Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, Beets, 
Parsnips and Leeks, the early varieties of 
Radish, and for the last crop, the Black 
Spanish. 

Sow Spring and Purple Top Turnip. Euta 
Baga may also be sown, for table use later in 
spring. 

Sow Lettuce, Endive, Cabbage, Broccoli, 
Kohlrabi, and early Cauliflower; the best sown 
in a frame to be transplanted next month. 

Cress, Chervil, Parsley and Celery for cut- 
ting, should be sown this month. Sow 
Eoquette and Sorrel. 

If the hot-bed has not been prepared already, 
malsie it at once to sow Egg-Plant, Pepper and 
Tomatoes. 

AH kinds of Herb seed may be sovv^n during 
this month. Plant Peas for a general crop, 
towards the end of the month the Extra Early 
varieties laiaj be planted. 

Plant Potatoes, but the Early Eose should 



not be planted before the latter end of this 
month. 

Divide and transplant Shallots. Transplant 
Cabbage plants sown in November. Onions, 
if not already set out, should be hurried now, 
so they may have time to bulb. Those v/ho 
desire to raise Onion sets, should sov>^ the seed 
towards the end of this month, as they may 
be used for setting out early in the fall, and 
can be sold sooner than those raised fTom seed. 
Creole seed is the only kind which can be 
used to raise sets from. Northern seed will not 
make sets. This I know from experience. 
Asparagus roots should be set out this month. 

Eed Oats can be sown. I consider these and 
the German Millet the two best anniial forage 
plants for Louisiana. — Cucumbers can be 
planted in the hot-bed; they are mostly plant- 
ed here during November and December, but 
if the hot-bed is properly made, those planted 
in this month will bear better than those 
planted in November, 



FEeeUARY. 



All winter vegetables can be sown this 
month, such as Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, 
Beets, Parsnips and Leeks. Also, the early 
varieties of Eadishes and Spring and Purple 
Top Tumix), Swiss Chard and Kohlrabi 

Sow, for succession. Lettuce, Cabbage and 
early Cauliflower; if the season is favorable, 
and the month of April not too dry, the latter 
may succeed. 

Cauliflov/er and Cabbage plants should be 
transplanted; Shallots divided and set out 
again. 

Sow Sorrel, Eoquette, Chervil, Parsley, 
Cress and Celery for seasoning. 

Peas of all kinds can be planted, especially 
the early varieties. The late kinds should be 



sown in January, but they may be planted 
during this month. 

This is the time to plant the general crop of 
Potatoes. On an average they will succeed 
better when planted during this, than during 
any other month. 

Herb seeds should be planted; tender varie- 
ties best sown in a frame, and transplanted 
into the open ground afterwards. 

Asparagus roots should be planted; this is 
the proper month to sow the seed of this 
vegetable. 

Plants in the hot-bed will require attention; 
give air when the sun shines, and the weather 
is pleasant. If too thick, thin out, so they 
may become sturdy. 



84 



RICHiJRD FSOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MAJTUAL 



Bush Beans can be commenced -with this 
month; Cncumbers, Sqnash and Melons may 
be tried, as they often succeed; if protected 
by small boxes, as most gardeners protect | 
them, there is no risk at aU. i 

Corn can be planted towards the end of this | 
month. For market, the Adams Extra Early ; 
and Early "White Flint are planted. I recom- 



mend the Sngar varieties for family use; they 
are jnst as large as those mentioned, and 
St-owel's Evergreen is as large as any variety 
gro-vm. 

Mangel Wurzel and Sngar Beet should be 
sown in this month for stock. Sweet Potatoes 
can be pnt in a bed for sprouting, so as to 
have early shps. 



MARCH 



Sow Beets, Eadish.- Cabbage, early varieties; 
Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, 
Swiss Chard and Leek. 

Also, Celery for cutting, Parsley, Boquette, 
Cress and Chervil The latter part of the 
month sow Endive. Of Lettuce, the Soyal 
Cabbage and Perpignan; the "White Coss is a 
favorite variety for spring; the Butterhead will 
run into seed too quickly, and should not be 
sown later than the middle of February in this 
latitude. 

Plant a full supply of Bush and Pole Beans. 
For Lima Beans better to wait till towards the 
end of the month, as they rot easily when the 
ground is not Wcirm enough, or too wet. 

Squash, Cucumbers, Melons and Okra can 
be planted. The remai'k in regai'd to Lima 
Beans holds good for Okra. Early varieties 
of Peas may still be planted. 

Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Peppers can be 
set out in the open ground, and seed sown for 
a later crop. Plant Sweet Com. 



Potatoes can be planted; all depends upon 
the season. Some years they do as well as 
those planted during last month. 

Beans are hard to keep in this climate, and 
therefore very few are planted for shelling 
purposes. "VS'ith a little care, however, they 
can be kept, but they ought not to be planted 
before the first of August, so that they may 
ripen when the weather gets cooler. When 
the season is favorable leave them out till dry; 
gather the pods and expose them a few days 
to the sun. It is best to shell them at once, 
and after they are shelled put them to air and 
sun again for a few days longer. Sacks are 
better to keep them in than barrels and boxes. 
The Bed and "^Tiite Eldney are generally the 
varieties used for drying. Beans jraised in 
spring are hard to keep, and if intended for 
seed they should be put up in bottles, or in 
tin boxes, and a httle camphor sprinkled be- 
tween them. 

Sweet Potatoes should be planted. 



APRIL, 



Sow Bush, Pole and Lima Beans, Sweet 
Com, Cucumbers, Squash, Melons and Okra. 

Beets, CaiTots, Swiss Chard, Eadish, Lettuce, 
]\Iustard, Endive, Eoquette, Cress, Parsley, 
Chervil and Celery for cuttiug. 

Sow Toma:toes,*Egg Plants and Pepper for 
succession. It is rather late to sow Cabbage 
seed now, but if sown, the early varieties only 
can be successfully used. Kohli-abi can still 
be sown, but it is best to sow it thinly in 
drills a foot apart, and thin out to four inches 
in the rows. 

Towards the end of this month a sowing of 
the late Itahan Giant Cauliflower can be made. 
It is very large, and takes from eight to nine 
months before it matures, so it has to be sown 
early. It is always best to make a couple of 
sowings, so that in case one should fail the 
other "may be used. This variety is hai'dier 
than the French and German kinds. A good 
plan is to sow the seed in boxes, elevated two 



feet or more above the ground, as it will keep 
the cabbage-fly off. The plants should be 
overlooked daily, and all green cabbage worms 
or other vermin removed. 

Sweet Potato Slips, for early crop, cfui be 
planted out. Early Iiish Potatoes will be fit 
to dig now, and the ground they are taken out 
of may be planted with Com, Beans, Squash, 
et«. 

Sow Pumpkins of both kinds, the Field and 
the Cashaw. 

German ^Millet should be sown this month. 
The groimd ought to be well plowed and 
harrowed. Three pecks of seed is the quantum 
to be sown per acre. It ■wiU be well to roll 
the ground after sowing, and the seed vriR 
require no other covering. If no roUer is 
handy, some brush tied together ought to be 
passed over the ground sown. For hay it 
should be cut when in flower. Every planter 
should sdve it a trial. 



MAY. 



Very few varieties of vegetables can be sown 
during this month. Many of the winter va- 
rieties vrUl not do well if sown now. The 
ground should now be occupied with growing 
crops. 

Where Potatoes and Onions are taken up, 
Com. Melons. Cucumbers, Squash and Pump- 
kins may be planted. 



j Nothing of the Cabbage kind, except the 
! Creole Cabbage seed, can be sown this month. 
.' It is supposed to stand the heat better than 
; other varieties, but it makes only loose heads 
j and runs to seed as early as the end of Novem- 
j bar. 

I Yellow and white summer Eadish and Endive 
i should be sown. Lettuce requires much water 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



85 



during hot weather, and, if neglected, will be- 
come hard and tasteless. The Perpiguau is 
the best kind for summer use. Okra can still 
be sown. 

The first sowing of White Solid Celery is to 
be made this month. The seed requires to be 
shaded, and, if the weather is dry, should be 
regularly watered. Late Italian Cauliflower 
should be sown. 

Cow Peas can be planted between the corn, 
or the crowders in rows; the latter are the best 
to be used green. If they are sown for fer- 
tilizing pui-poses, they are sown one bushel per 
acre, and plowed under when the groimd is 



well covered; or sometimes they are left till 
fall, when they commence to decay, and then 
plowed down. 

Sweet Potato Slips can be set out, taking 
advantage of an occassional rain; if it does not 
rain they have to be watered. The top of 
Shallots will commence to get dry; this indi- 
cates that they are fit to take up. Pull them 
up and expose to the sun for a few days, and 
then store them awaj'' in a dry, airy place, 
taking care not to lay them too thick, as they 
are liable to heat. Lima or Pole Beans can be 
planted; the Southern Prohfic is the best va- 
riety for late planting. 



JUS^E 



This month is similar to the last, that is, not 
a great deal can be sown. The growing crops 
wiU require attention, as weeds grow fast. 
Plant Corn for the last supply of roasting ears. 
A few Water and Musk Melons may be planted. 
Cucumbers, Sqiiash and Pumpkins planted 
this month generally do very well, but the first 
requires an abundance of water if the weather 
is dry. 

Southern Prolific Pole Beans may be planted 
during this month. Continue to set out Sweet 
Potato vines. 

Sow Yellow and White Summer Kadish; sow 
Endive for Salad; this is raised more easily than 
the Lettuce. 

Lettuce can be sown, but it requires more 
■care than most people are willing to bestow. 
Soak the seeds for half an hour in water, take 
them out and put them in a piece of cloth, and 
place in a cool spot — under the cistern, or, if 
convenient, in an ice box. Keep the cloth 
moist, and in two or three days the seeds will 
sprout. Then sow them ; best to do so in the 
evening, and give a watering. 



If the seed is sown without being sprouted, 
ants will be likely to carry it away before it can 
germinate, and the seedsman be blamed for 
selling seeds that did not grow. This sprouting 
has to be- done from May to September, de- 
pending upon the weather. Should the weather 
be moist and cool in the fall, it can be dis- 
pensed with. Some sow late Cabbage for winter 
crop in this month, saying the jjlants are easier 
raised during this than the two following 
months. I consider this month too soon; 
plants will become too hard and long-legged 
before they can be planted out. 

This is the last month to sow the Late Italian 
Cauliflower; towards the end the Early Itahan 
Giant Cauliflower can be sown. Some cultiva- 
tors transplant them, when large enough, at 
once into the open gi-ound; others plant them 
first into flowerpots and transplant them into 
the ground later. If transplanted at this time, 
they ^yi]l require to be shaded for a few days, 
till they commence to grow. 

Sow Tomatoes for late crop during the latter 
part of this month. 



JULY. 



Plant Pole Beans; also. Bush Beans, towards 
the end of the month. Sow Tomatoes in the 
early part for the last crop. Some corn for 
roasting ears may still be planted. Cucumbers 
can be planted for pickling. Early Giant Cau- 
liflower can be sown. Sow Endive, Lettuce, 
Yellow and White Summer Radish. Where 
the ground is new, some Turnips and Ruta 
Bagas can be sown. Cabbage should be com- 
menced with after the 15th of this month; 
Superior Plat Dutch, Improved Drumhead, St. 
Denis, or Bonneuil and Brunswick are the 
leading kinds. It is hard to say which is the 
hest time to sow, as our seasons differ so much 
— some seasons we get frost early, other seasons 
not before January. Cabbage is most easily 
hurt by frost when it is half grown; when the 
plants are small, or when they are headed up, 
frost does not hurt much. It is always good 
to make two or three so-v^dngs. As a general 
thing, plants raised from seeds sown in July 
and August, give the most satisfaction; they 
are almost certain to head. September, in my 
experience, is the most ticklish month; as the 



seed sown in that month is generally only half 
grown when we have some frosts, and there- 
fore, more liable to be hurt. But there are 
exceptions. Some years ago the seed sown in 
September turned out best. Seed sown at the 
end of October and during November generally 
give good residts. November is the proper 
month to sow for shipping. The surest way 
to sow is in a cold frame, to protect the plants 
from frosts which sometimes occur in Decem- 
ber and January. January, and the early part 
of February, is early enough to set out. 
Brunswick is the earliest of the large grow- 
ing kinds, and it should be sown in July 
and August, so that it may be headed up 
when the cold comes, as it is more tender than 
the Flat Dutch and Drumhead. The same 
may be said in regard to the St. Denis. All 
cabbages require strong, good soil; but these 
two varieties particularly. Brunswick makes 
also a very good spring cabbage when sown at 
the end of October. The standard varieties, 
the Superior Flat Dutch and Improved Drum- 
head, should be sown at the end of this month 



EICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



and duiing next. It is better to sow plenty of I 
seeds than to be short of plants. I would 
prefer one hundred plants raised in July and | 
August, to four times that amount raised in 
September. It is very hard to protect the 
young plants from ravages of the fly. Strong- 



tobacco water is as good as anything else for 
this purpose, or tobacco stems cut fine and 
scattered over the ground will keep them off 
to some extent. As the plants have to be 
watered, the smell of the tobacco v\t11 drive the 
flies away. 



AUCUST. 



This is a very active month for gardening in 
the South. Plant Bush Beans, Extra Early 
and Washington Peas.- Sow late Cabbages and 
Drumhead Savoy, also Broccoli, Brussels 
Sprouts and Kale. The Early Italian Giant 
Cauliflower may still be sown; but now is the 
proper time to sow the Half Early Paris 
and other early varieties. 

Sow Parsley, Boquette, Chervil, Lettuce, 
Endive and Son'el; but, in case of dry weather, 
these seeds will have to be watered fi'equently. 

Continue to sow Yellow Turnip Eadishes, 
and commence to sow red varieties, such as 
Scarlet TurnixD, Half Long French and Long 
Scarlet. 

Towards the end of the month the Black 
Spanish Eadish can be sown; also, Swiss Chard. 

Sow Mustard and Cress; the former ^^ill 
generally do well. All kinds of Turnips and 
Euta Bagas should be sown; also. Kohlrabi. 

The seed of all kinds of Beets should be put 
in the gTound. 



Towards the end of the month Carrots can 
be sown; but the sowing of all vegetables at 
this time of the year depends much upon the 
season. If we should have hot and dry weather, 
it is useless to do much, as seeds cannot come 
up vdthout being watered. White Solid Celery 
should be sown for a succession, and the 
Dwarf lands for spring use. 

Shallots can be set out during this month; 
also, Onion Sets, especially if they are raised 
from Creole seed. The early part of the month 
is the proper time to plant Eed and White 
Kidney Beans, for shelling and drying for 
winter use. 

Early Eose and other varieties of Potatoes 
should be planted early this month for a winter 
crop, and the latest of Tomato plants should 
be set out, if not done last month. If Celery 
plants are set out during this month, they 
require to be shaded. 



SSPTE^BE^, 



]\Iost of the seeds recommended for last 
month can be sown this month, and some 
more added. 

In the early part, Bush Beans can be planted, 
as they 'ssrill bear before fi'ost comes. Plant 
Extra Early and early varieties of Peas. Sow 
Eadishes of all kinds. Carrots, Beets, Parsnip, 
Salsify, Eoquette, Chervil, Parsley, Sorrel, 
Cress, Lettuce, Endive, Leek, Turnips, Kohl- 
rabi, Broccoli, Early Cauliflower, Kale, Celery, 
Corn Salad and Mustard. 

After the 15th of this month, Creole Onion 
seed can be sown. This is an important crop, 
and should not be neglected. If it is very 
di-y, cover the bed, after the seed has been 
sown, with green moss; it will keep the ground 



moist, and the seed will come up more regu- 
larly. The moss has to be taken off as the 
young plants make their appearance. 

Celery plants may be set out in ditches pre- 
pared for that purpose. Cauliflower and Cab- 
bage plants can be transplanted if the weather 
is favorable. 

If the weather is not too hot and dry. Spinach 
should be sown; but it is useless to do so if the 
weather is not suitable. 

Cabbage can be sown, but it is much better 
to sow in August and transplant duiing this 
month. 

Set out Shallots. Sorrel should be divided 
and replanted. 

Sov/ Turnip-rooted Celery. 



OCTOBER 



Artichokes should be dressed, the suckers 
or sprouts taken off and new plants made. 

Onion seed can still be sown; but it is better 
to get the seed into the ground as soon as pos- 
sible, so the plants get to be some size before 
the cold weather comes. 

Towards the end of the month Black Eye 
MaiTowfat Peas can be planted; also, English 
or Windsor Beans. 

Sow Cabbage, Cauliflower, BroccoU, Binis- 
sels Sprouts, Kale, Sx^inach, Mustard, S-^iss 
Chard, Carrots, Beets, Salsify, Leek, Corn 
Salad, Parsley, Eoquette, Chervil, Kohlrabi, 
Eadish, Lettuce, Endive and Parsnip. Shal- 
lots from the first planting can be divided and 
set out again. Salsify does very finely here, 



but is generally sown too late; this is the 
proper month to sow the seed. The ground 
should be mellow and have been manured last 
spiing. It should be spaded up very deeply, 
as the size and smoothness of the roots depend 
upon the preparation of the soil. 

Water the Celery \^ith soap suds, and if the 
season has been favorable by the end of the 
month, some may be earthed up. 

Sow Eye, Barley and Eed Oats, Orchard 
Grass, Eed and White Clover, and Alfalfa 
Clover. Strawberry plants should be trans- 
planted; they cannot be left in the same spot 
for three or four years, as is done North. The 
Yv'ilson's Albany*^ and Sucker State are the 
favorite yarieties for the market. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



87 



The Wilson's Albany do not make many- 
runners here, but they form a stool, something 



like the plants of violets, and these stools have 
to be taken up and divided. 



NOVEMBER. 



Continue to sow Spinach, Corn Salad, Rad- 
ish, Lettuce, Mustard, Roquette, Parsley, 
Chervil, Carrots, Salsify, Parsnips, Cress and 
Endive, also Turnips and Cabbage. Superior 
Flat Dutch and Improved Drumhead, sown in 
this month, make line Cabbage in the spring. 
— Artichokes should be dressed, if not already 
done last month. 

Sow Black Eye and other late varieties of 
Peas. Frost does not hurt them as long as 
they are small, and during this time of the 
year they will grow but very slowly. English 
Beans can be planted; frost does not hurt 



them, and, if not planted soon, they ^dll not 
bear much. 

Manure for hot-beds should be looked after, 
and ought not to be over one month old. It 
should be thrown together in a heap, and, 
when heated, forked over again, so the long 
and short manure will be well mixed. The 
first vegetables generally sown in the hot-beds 
are Cucumbers; it is best to start them in two 
or three inch pots, and when they have two 
rough leaves, transplant them to their place; 
two good plants are sufficient under every sash 



DECESVIBER. 



Not a great deal is planted during this 
month, as the ground is generally occupied by 
the grovdng crops. 

Plant Peas for a general crop; some Potatoes 
may be risked, but it is uncertain whether they 
will succeed or not. 

Sow Spinach, Roquette, Radish, Carrots, 
Lettuce, Endive and Cabbage. 

Early varieties of Cauliflower can be sov/n 
in a frame or sheltered situation, to be trans- 
planted in February into the open ground. 



Early Cabbages, such as York, Oxheart and 
Winningstadt, may be sown. 

To those who wish to force Tomatoes I will 
say that this is the month to sow them. The 
best kind for that purpose is the Extra Early 
Dwarf Red. It is really a good acquisition; it 
is very dwarfish, very productive, and of good 
size, and bears the fruit in clusters, but will 
sell only for the first, as the fruit is not so 
large as the Livingston varieties, which come 
in later. 



FLOWER SEEDS. 



The following list of Flower seeds is not very large, but it contains all which is desirable 
and which wHl do well in the Southern climate. I import them from one of the most celebrated 
growers in Prussia, and they are of the best quahty. There are very few or no flower seeds 
raised in this country, and Northern houses, which publish large lists and catalogues, get them 
from just the same sources as myself; but they, on an average, sell much higher than I do. 
Some varieties, which are biennial in Europe or North, flower here the first season ; in fact, if 
they do not, they generally do not flower at all, as they usually are destroyed by the continued 
long heat of summer. Some kinds grow quicker here and come to a greater perfection than in 
a more Northern latitude. 

Flower seeds require a little more care in sowing than vegetable seeds. The ground should 
be well pulverized and light enough not to bake after a rain. Some of the more delicate and 
fijier varieties are better sown in boxes or seed pans, where they can be better handled and 
protected from hard rains or cold weather; the other kinds do not transplant well, and are better 
sown at once where they are to remain, or a few seeds naaj be sown in small pots to facilitate 
transplanting into the garden without disturbing the plants, when large enough. Some have 
very fine seeds, which the mere pressing of the hand or spade to the soil will cover; others may 
be covered one-fourth of an inch, according to their size. Watering should be done carefully, 
and if not done with a syringe, a watering pot, where the holes of the spout are very fine, should 
be used. 

By setting the plants out, or sowing the seeds in the border, consideration should be taken 
of the height, so that the taller varieties may be in the middle and the dwarf kinds on the edge 
of the bed. 

The seeds are put up at ten cents a package, fifteen packages for one dollar, except a few 
rare or costly kinds, where the price is noted. All flower seeds in packages are mailed free o£ 
postage to the purchaser. Where there is more than one color, I generally import them mixed, 
as I find that most of my customers do not wish to purchase six packages, or more, of one 
variety, in order to get all the colors. One package of Asters, Zinnia, Phlox, Chinese Pink, 
German Stocks, Petunia, Portulaca, and others, will always contain an equal mixture of the 
best colors. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





Amaranthus Salicifolius, Fountain Plant. 



Trufaut's Pseony- Flowered Aster. 




Althea Rosea. 



German Quilled Aster. Amaranthus Tricolor. 




Amaranthus Caudatus. 



Double Daisy. 



Adonis autumnalis. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



89 




Cyclamen Persicum. 



Althea Rosea. Hollyhock. This flower 
has been much improved of late years, and is 
very easily cultivated. Can be sown from 
October till April, Very hardy; from four to 
six feet high, 

Alyssum ntaritiiniiia. Sweet Alys- 
sum. Very free flowering plants, about six 
inches high, with white flowers ; very fragrant. 
Sow from October till April. 

AiitirliiiB«in inajus. Snapdragon. 
Choice mixed. Showy plant of various colors. 
About two feet high. Should be sown early, 
if perfect flowers are desired. Sow from 
October till March. 

Aster. Queen Margaret. German Quilled. 
Perfect double quilled flower, of all shades, 
from white to dark purple and crimson. One 
and a half feet high. 

Aster. Trufaut's Pseony-Flowered Per- 
fection. Large double paeony-shaped flowers, 
of line mixed colors; one of the best varieties. 
Two feet high; sow from December till March. 
Asters should be sown in a box or in pots, 
and kept in a green-house, or near a window; 
when large enough, transplant into the border. 
Take a shovel of compost and mix with the 
ground before planting. Put three to four 
plants together and they will show better. 
They can be cultivated in pots, 

Adonis a«t«iniitalis. Flos Adonis 
or Pheasant's Eye, Showy crimson flower, of 



long duration. One foot high. Sow from 
November till April. 
ABitaa'anthus^eaiidatus. Love Lies 

Bleeding, Long red racemes with blood red 
flowers. Very graceful; three feet high. 

AsBaaraiithus tricolor. Three- 
colored Amaranth, Very showy; cultivated 
on account of its leaves, which are green, 
yellow and red. Two to three feet high. 

Anaaranttaus bicoSor. Two-colored 
Amaranth. Crimson and green variegated 
foliage; good for edging. Two feet high. 

Amaranth IIS Salicifolius. Foun- 
tain Plant. Rich colored foliage, very grace- 
ful Five to six feet high. Sow from Febru- 
ary till June. 

Aquifleg^ia. Columbine. A showy and 
beautiful flower of different colors; two feet 
high. Sow from October till March. Should 
be sown early if flowers are wished; if sown 
late will not bloom till next season. 

Balsa&nina Hortensis. Lady Slip- 
per. A well known flower of easy culture. 
Requires good ground to produce double 
flowers. 

Balsainiaa. Improved Camelia- 
flowered. Very double and beautiful colors. 
The strain which I offer of this variety is very 
fine; but to have them perfect, they should 
not be sown too soon. In rich ground and 



90 



HICHARD FEOTSCHEE's ALMAXAC AlfD GARDEN MANUAL 




Aquilegia, or Columbine. 



Cheirantlius Cheiri. 







:^',^ 
^^^u 



<:i^ 

^1^ 
fe 







Dianthus Chinensis, Double. 



Centaurea Cyanus. 



Diauthus Barbatus. 




Celosia Cristata. 



Balsamina Camelia-Flowered. Calendula officinalis. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



91 



during dry weather tliey require plenty of 
water. 
BralsaiBiaoa cauielEia flora alba. 

Pure white flowers, used for bouquets; about 
two feet high. Sow from February till August. 

Bel lis PereaaBiis. Daisy. Finest 
double mixed variety; four inches high. From 
October till January. 

Bi'OwalDIa elata major. A free 
blooming plant of about 12 inches in height, 
"\^ath very showy dark blue flowers. If sown 
in March it will flov.-er all summer, but can 
also be sown in November potted and kept 
under glass, where it will begin to bloom in 
the latter part of December and continue all 
%\inter. 

3Seg"oma tuberosa. A very thankful 
green-house plant with tuberous roots and 
large showy pink, white or red flowers. 
It is of easy culture and can be kept out of 
doors in a half shady place after the 15th of 
April. Sow from October tiU March in flower 
pots. Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

JSegfoeia Hex. A beautiful and showy 
gi-eenhouse foliage plant of easy culture. Will 
do well oiit of doors during summer months, 
but requires a shady place. Sow like above. 
Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

Caealia cocctnea. Scarlet Tassel 
Flower. A profuse flowering plant, with 
tassel-shaped flowers in cluster; one and a half 
feet. Sow February till May. 

Calendula oi^ciualis. PotMarigold. 
A plant which, properly speaking, belongs to 
the aromatic herbs, but sometimes cultivated 
f cv the flov/ers, which varj^ in different shades 
or yellow; one and a half feet high. From 
January till April. 

CeBosia eristata. Dwarf Cock'scomb. 
Y\''ell known class of flowers which are very 
ornamental, producing large heads of crimson 
and yellov/ flowers; one to two feet high. Sow 
from Februarj^ till August. 

CBueBrafiBtSius Claeara. Wall Flower. 
This flower is highly esteemed in some parts 
of Europe, but does not grow very perfectly 
here, and seldom produces the large spikes of 
double flowers which are very fragrant. Two 
feet high. November till March. 

Caiiipai»M8a i§|>ecuJusii. Bell- 
Fiower, or Venus' Looking-Glass. Free flower- 
ing plants of different colors, from white to 
dark blue; one foot high. Sow December till 
March. 

CefifitaBBG'ea eyatiMS. Bottle Pink. 
A hardy annual of eas}'- culture, of various 
colors; two feet high. 

€esBta»rca suavolens. Yellow, 
Sweet Sultan. December to April. 

Citiieraria liybrida. A beautiful 
gi-een-house plant. Seed should bo sown in 
October or November, and they will flower in 
spring. Per package, 25 cents. 

Cineraria MaritiMia. A handsome 



border plant, which is cultivated on account 
of its silvery white leaves. Stands our summer 
well. 

CoBeaiS. A well known and beautiful 
bedding plant which can be easily propagated 
by seeds which produce different shades of 
colored plants. 

CycBauieiB persicram. Alpine Violet. 
A green-house plant with tuberous or rather 
bulbous roots, blooming abundantly; being 
possessed of very ornamental foliage and of 
easy culture it should not be missing in any 
collection of green-house plants. Sow in 
August and September in pots; transplant in 
small pots when large enough, and keep either 
in green-house or a room near the window, 
and give plentj^ of light and air. Keep Bulbs 
dry during summer. Price, per packet, 25 
cents. 

Correopsas. (Calleopsis.) Bright Eye 
Daisy. Handsome free blooming plants, of 
the easiest culture, 2 to 3 feet high, with 
yellow and brown daisy like flowers. Decem- 
ber to March. 

ChrysantSiemiieM tricolor (cari- 
natum). Summer Chrysanthemum. Showy 
summer bloomers of different colors, 12 to 15 
inches high. If grouped together they have a 
pleasing effect. Sow in March and April. 

©iamtaaus JBarbalos. Sweet William. 
A well known plant which has been much im- 
proved of late years. Their beautiful colors- 
make them very showy. Should be sown early, 
otherwise they will not flower the first spring; 
one and a half feet high. October till April. 

l>iaBitGBaiS CbineEflSis. Chinese Pink. 
A beautiful class of annuals of various colors, 
which flower very profusely in earlj'- spring 
and summer; one foot high. From October 
till April. 

OiaaBtiafis If eddlevs^flg:§"ii. Japan 
Pink. This is the most showy of any of the 
annual pinks. The flowers are very large and 
of brilliant colors; one foot high. Sow from 
October till April. 

I^ianESBBis piGflaataris. Border Pink. 
A fragrant pink used for edging. The flowers- 
are tinged, generally pink or white, with a 
dark eye. Does not flower the first year; two 
feet high. Sow from January till April. 

©iaBBllaaas caa^yopBiyllus. Carnation 
Pink. This is a well known and highly es- 
teemed class of flowers. Thej'' are double, of 
different colors, and very fragrant; can be 
soM^n either in fall or spring; should be shaded 
during midsummer and protected from hard 
rains; three to four feet high. November till 
April. 

DiantBiQis Picotee. Finest hybrids. 
Stage flowers saved from a collection of over 
500 named varieties; per package. 50c. 

I>iautEitis piiuaifla. Early dwarf 
flowering Carnation. If sown early, this va- 
riety will flower the first season. They are 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Dianthus Picotee. 



Dianthus Heddewiggii. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



93 



quite dwa2-fisli and flower very profusely. 
November till April. 
Delpliiniufii Imperialism fl. pi. 

Imperial flowering Larkspur. Very handsome 
variety of symmetrical form. Mixed colors; 
bright red, dark blue and red stripes; 1^ feet 
high. 

Note — None of the above three vai-ieties transplant well, and are better Bown at once where they are in- 
tended to remain. 



I>elphiniuEBi ajsicis. Rocket Lark- 
spur. Mixed colors; very showy; two and a 
half feet. 

DeBpBiiriiuin CBiinensis. Dwarf 
China Larkspur. Mixed colors; very pretty; 
one foot high. November till April. 




Mathiola Annua. 



Geranium Zonale. 



94 



RICHAED FROTSCHER 8 ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Blue Grove Love. 




Pctiiuia hybrida. 




Nigella Daniascena. 



Dahlia^ Large Flowering Dahlia, Seed 
sown in the spring will flower by June. Very 
pretty colors are obtained from seed; the semi- 
donble or single ones can be pulled up as they 
bloom 5 but those seeds which are saved from 
fine double varieties vnh produce a good per- 
cent-age of double flowers. February till June. 

£sctischoltziaCaliforiiiea. Cali- 
fornia Poppy. A very free flowering plant, 
good for masses. Does not transplant well. 
One foot high. December till April. 

Oatllardia toic©lor. Two-colored 
Gaillardia. Very showy plants, which con- 
tinue to flower for a long time. Flowers red, 
bordered with orange yellow. One and a half 
feet high. January till April. 

Oonaphrena alba and purpurea, 

"^Tiite and Crimson Batcheior Button or Globe 
Amaranth. Well known variety of flowers; 
very early and free flowering; continue to 
flower for a long time. Two feet high. From 
February till August. 

Oerauitiiu Zouale. Zonale Ger- 
anium. ISeed saved from large flowering va- 
rieties of different colors; should be sovm in 
seed pans, and when large enough transplanted 
into pots, where thej can be left, or trans- 
l^lanted in spring into the open ground. 

Oerai^Enm peSarg^osiituai^. Large 
flowering Pelargonium. Spotted varieties, 25 
cents per package. 

Oeraiiitiin odoratisslsna. Apple- 
scented Geranium. Cultivated on account of 
its fragrant leaves; 25 cents per package. Both 
of these kinds are pot plants, and require 
shade during hot weather. Should be sown 
draing taU. and winter. 

Meiiotropistoa. Ivlis:ed varieties viith 
dark and hght shaded flower. A well knovrn 
plant, esteemed for the fragrance of its flowers, 
which are j)roduced during the whole summer 
in great profusion. This plant is generally 
propagated by cutting, but can also be raised 
from seed. Should be sown in a hot-bed if 
sown early. 

HelBcIirysMsn moaistrosism al- 
bum. White Everlasting Flower. Very 
showy double flowers. One and a haK feet 
high. 

flelictirysusn jsuonstrosum rub- 
ra su. Bed Everlasting Flower. Yery orna- 
mental. One and a half feet high. December 
till April. Does not transplant well. 

Meliantbns fi, p3. Double Flowering 
Sunflower. A well known i^lant, -with showy 
yellow flowers. The double is often cultivated 
in the flower garden. The single varieties are 
cultivated mostly for the seed. They are said 
to be anti-malarious. Four feet high. Feb- 
ruary till ^lay. 

Iberis amara. White Candytuft. A 
well known plant raised a good deal by florists 
for bouquets. Can be sown at di£erent times 
to have a succession of flowers. One foot high. 

Iberis uT^belata rosea^ Pui-ple 
Candytuft. One foot- October tili April. 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



95 




Lychnis Chalcedoniea. 





Ge rani am Pelargonium. 



Ice Plfint. 




Double Matricaria. 




Helichrysum Moustrosum Album. 



96 



EICHARD FROTSCHER'8 ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




CEnothera Lamarekiana. 




Papaver Ranunculus Flowered. 




Portulaca. 



liinnm ^randiflornin riibrniiiw 

Scarlet Flax. A Terr pretty plant for masses 
or borders, with bright scarlet flowers, dai-k in 
the centre. One foot. January till April. 

Lobelia erinns. Lobelia. A very 
graceful plant with white and bhie flowers, 
well adapted for hanging baskets or border. 
Half foot. October till March. 

JLycbnis chalcedoiiica. Lychnis. 
Fine plants with scarlet, white and rose flowers. 
Two feet. December till April. 

LiUpinilS. Lupinus. Plants with spikes 
of flowers of various colors. Should be sown 
soon. Does not transplant well. Two feet. 
October till March. 

ITIathiola annua. Ten weeks stocks. 
This is one of the finest annuals in cultivation. 
Large flowers of all colors, from white to dark 
blue or crimson. Should be sown in pots or 
pans, and when large enough transplanted into 
rich soil. One and a quarter feet. October 
tm March. 

^esembryantheniiiui crystalli- 
nuin. Ice plant. Neat plant with icy look- 
ing foliage. It is of spreading habit. Good 
for baskets or beds. One foot. February tiU. 

March. 

Mininliis tigriaius. Monkey flower. 
Showy flowers of yellow and brown. Should 
be sown in a shady place. Does not transplant 
well. Hah: foot. December till March. 

i^atricaria capefBSis. Double Mat- 
ricaria. TMiite double flowers, resembhng the 
Daisy, but smaller; are fine for bouquets; 
blooms very nearly the whole summer. Two 
feet. December till March. 

Minsosa pndica. Sensitive Plant. A 
curious and interesting plant which folds up 
its leaves when touched One foot. February 
till June. 

ITIirabslES jalapa. Marvel of Pem. 
A well know plant of easy culture; producing 
flowers of various colors. It forms a root 
which can be preserved from one year to an- 
other. February till June. Three feet. 

Myosofis i>a!ustris. Forget-me-not. 
A fine little plant -with small, blue, star-like 
flowers. Should have a moist, shady situation. 
Does not succeed so well here as in Europe, of 
which it is a native. Half foot high. Decem- 
ber till March. 

:^enioptiila In§ig:nis. Blue Grove 
Love. Plants of easy culture, very pretty and 
profuse bloomers. Bright blue with white 
centre. One foot high. 

Nemophila Hiaeulata. Large white 
flowers spotted with violet. One foot high. 
December till April. 

Nig^ella daniascena. Love in a 
Mist. Plants of easy culture, with Mght blue 
flowers. Does not transplant well. One foot 
high. December tiU April. 

NiereMibergffa g:raeili$. Nierem- 
bergia. Nice plants with dehcate foliage, and 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



97 




Phlox Drummondii Grandiflora. 





Phlox Drummondii Grandiflora Stellata Splendens. 



Scabiosa nana. 



EICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND QARDElf MANUAL 




Tagetes Patula. 



Vinca Rosea and Alba. 



Reseda Odorata. 




Phlox Drummoudii, alba fl. pi. 

white flowers tinted with lilac. One foot high. 
November till April. 

<Enothera Lanaarckiaua. Even- 
ing Primrose. Showy, large yellow flowers. 
December till April. Two feet high. 

Papaver Somniferuni. Double 
flowering Poppy. Of different colors; very 
showy. 

Paparer ranunculus flowered. 

Double fringed flowers, very showy. Cannot 
be transplanted. Two feet high. October 
till March, 



Petunia liybrida. Petunia. Splendid 
mixed hybrid varieties. A verv decorative jDlant 
of various colors, well known to almost every 
lover of flowers. Plants are of spreading 
habit; aboiit one foot high. January till May. 

Petunia flora pieno. Large double 
flowering varieties. They are hybridized with 
the finest strains, and will give from 20 to 25 
per cent, of double flowers. Very handsome; 
25 cents per package. January till ^larch. 

Phlox I>runiBnondii. Drummond's 
Phlox. One of the best and most popular 
annuals in cultivation. Their various colors 
and length of flowering, with easy culture, 
make them favorites with every one. All fine 
colors mixed. One foot high. December till 
April. 

Phlox Druinmondii grandiflora. 

This is an improvement on the foregoing kind; 
flowers are larger, with white centre, different 
colors mixed. Very beautiful. One foot high. 
December till April. 

Phlox Drumnaondii g^randiflora 
alba. Pure White, some with purple or 
violet eye. 

Phlox jDrummondii g^randi- 
flora, stellata splendens. This is 
admitted to be the richest colored and most 
effective of all large flowered Phloxes. It com- 



FOR THB SOUTHERN STATES. 



99 




Torenia Fournieri. 



Choicest Large English Pansy. 



100 



EICHAED FROTSCHEK S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Ziuuia Elegans, Grauditlora Kobusta Plenissima 



bines all the good qualities of the Splendens, 
■with the addition of a clearly defined, pnre 
white star, which contrasts strikingly with the 
vivid ciimson of the flowers. 

PJalox DruBSiisioBidifl Aitoa, iJl. pi. 
This is really the first double fiowering Phlox 
introduced. Fnlly two-thirds of the plants 
raised from this seed will give iDiire double 
white fiov.'ers. They can be used for bouquets, 
at the same time they are ornamental in the 
garden. 

Price, per packet, 10c. Give it a trial. 

Port u Site a. A small plant of great 
beauty, and of the easiest culture. Does best 



in a well exposed situation, where it has 
plenty of sim. The tiowers are of various 
colors, fi-om v/hite to bright scarlet and crim- 
son. The plant is good for edging vases or 
pots; or where large plants are kept in tubs, 
the surface can be filled vdth this neat little 
genus of plants. Half foot higii. February 
till August. 

Double Portulaca. The same variety of colors 
with semi-double and double fiowers. Half 
foot high. Febmaiy till August. 

PriiBiula \^eris. Cowslip. An her- 
I baceous plant of various colors, highly esteemed 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



101 



in Europe. Half foot high. December till 
Apiil. 

Primula claincnsas. Chinese Prim- 
rose. A green-house plant, which flowers 
profuBel3' and continues to bloom for a long 
time; should be sown early to insure the plant 
flowering well. Difterent colors; nrixed, per 




package, 25 cents. One and a half feet high. 
October till February. 

PyrethB'UJii aiareu. Golden Feather. 
The flowers resemble Asters. It has bright 
yellow leaves which make it very showy as a 
border if massed with plants, such as Coleus, 

etc. 

ISei^edla odorata. 

Sweet Mignonette. A fra- 
grant iDlant and a favorite 
with everybodv. One foot 
higli. 

Mesecia gri'airBdi- 

iloa*a. Similar to the above 
plant and flower, spikes 
larger. Fifteen inches. 

December till April. 

!§cal>i€>sa siaiia. 
D\\'arf Mourning Bride. 
Plants of double flowers of 
various colors. One foot 
high. December till April. 

§ap©2aj?ria csiSa- 

^i*a«ca. Soai)wort. A very 
fi'ee flowering annual, of 
ea';j cp.ltare, resembling 
somev/hat in leaves the Sweet 
William. One and a half 
feet high. December till 
April. 

§aSvm S2>Befe2des2S. 
Scarlet Salvia or Pied Flower- 
ing Sage. A i:»ot or green- 
house plant, but which can 
be grown ;is an annual, as it 
flowers freely from seed the 
first year. Two to three feet 
high. February till April. 

Sileaae ArBmeria. Lobel's Catchfly. 
A free blooming plant of easy culture; flowers 
almost any^vhere. lied and v/hite. One and 
a half feet high. 

Tag'etes er«cta. African or Tall- 
growing Marigold. Very showy annuals for 
borders, with bright yellow flowers growing 
upright. One and a half feet high. 



Double Portulaca, 




Hybridized Verbena. 



102 



RICEAED FEOTSCHER 3 ALMAI^AC A>*D GARDEN MANUAL 



Tagetes Patula. French, or D^arf ; 
Marigold. A verv compact dTvaif grooving | 
variety, covered Tdth yellow and brown ; 
flowers. One and a half feet high. Jannary '■ 

till Api-il. 

Toresila Foiirssieri. A plant from ■. 
Mexico of recent introduction, but which has 
become very popular in a short time. It 
stands the heat well is well adapted to pot 
cnltore, and makes one of the most valuable 
bedding plants we have. The flowers are of a 
sky blue color, with thi'ee spots of dark bine. ; 
The seeds are very fine and take a good while 
to germinate. It tians^Dlants very easily. 

TerbeEia lsyl>rada. Hybridized Ver- 
bena. A weU known and favorite flower for 
borders. Theii- long flowering and great 
diversity of color make them valuable for 
every gai*den, however smalL Ail colors 
mixed. One and a half feet high. Jamiarv 
till April. 

Terbena Striped Italiau. These 
are beantinil striped kind^s of all colors with 
large eyes. 

Terbeaaa Xiveni. ^Wliite Verbena. 
Pui-e white Verbena of more or less fragrance. 
One and a half feet high. .Jamiary till April , 

Vinca rosea and alba. Red and \ 

VThite Periwinkle. Plants of shining foliage, 
with white and dark rose colored flowers, 
which ai-e produced the whole summer and 
antiimn. Two feet high. Febmary till ApriL i 
Tiola odorata. Sweet Violet. WeU ' 
known edging plant, which generally is pro- : 
pagated by dividing the plants: but can also 
be raised from seed. Half foot high. Sow 
from Jannary till March. 

Viola trtcolor iiiaxiiisa. Large 
flowering choicest Pansy. This is one of the ' 
finest httle plants in crJtivi^tion for pots or 



the open ground. They are of endless colors 
and markings. Wh.en planted in the garden, 
they -^vill show better if planted in masses, and 
a httle elevated above the level of the garden. 
Half foot hish. October until March. 

L.a!gre Triiaardeau Paiisj'. This 
is the lai-gest vaiiety in cultivation: the 
flowers are well formed, generally three 
spotted; quite distinct: the plants grow com- 
pact. ' ^ ^ ^ 

]\ OU P I «S Ultra. Benary's ii^lite Pansy. 
This new variety from Germany is the finest 
of all Piinsies. Endowed with fine well formed 
flowers in endless colors and shades, they 
form a valuable acquisition to our many 
varieties in cultivation, find should not be 
missing in any gr-i'den. Price, '2oc. jjer packet, 

Ziiimsa elep^aass S. pi. Double Zin- 
nia. Plants of very easy culture, flowering 
very profusely through the whole summer 
and fall; producing double flowers of aU colors, 
almost as large as the flower of a Dahlia. 
Three feet high. February till August. 

IZiiiiiia eSe^raos puiisila fl. pi. 

Dwarf Double ^lixe-l A new dwarf section, 
especially desirable. The compact, bushy 
plants rarely grow over two feet high, and are 
covered with large flowers of great beauty. 



ba§Ta pleBsls^siiiia, A new variety 
recently introduced here from Germany. The 
plants of this new class of showy and attrac- 
tive annujtls are of very robust growth and 
produce very large and exti-emely double 
flowers; measuring from i to 5 inches in 
diameter. The seeds I offer for sale, come 
direct from the oiiginator, and contain about 
eight ditierent beautiful colors, mostly very 
bright. 



CLIMBING PLANTS. 



A»tig:o3?Ulll leptopiiS. Eosa mon- 
tana. One of the fnest perennial climbers of 
rapid gi'owth with long i-acemes of beautiful 
deep pink flowers. Being a native of Mexico, 
it is well adapted to our climate and will stand 
our most severe winters without any further 
protection than perhaps a slight cover of moss 
or straw. Sow in February or March in flower 
pots, and transplant into the open ground in 
May. "Wfll flower freely ihe first year. 

Aristolochia elegrans. Anewvaiie- 
ty of the well known •'Batchman's pipe," 
(which however will not grow here:! of 
vigorous growth and quite hardy in our climate. 
It is a profuse bloomer, bearing large flowers 
of a rich purple color with irregular branched 
markings of creamy white and golden yellow 
centre with rich velvety purple. This plant is 
one of the most thankful of all climbers, 
blooming when quite young and continuing 
to do so the whole summer. Will stand our 



winter without nrotection. Sow in J;inuary 
and Februaiy in flower pots, and transplant in 
open ground' when large enough. 

Senilis asa ccrifes'a. Wax Gourd. 
A strong growing vine with long shaped dark 
crimson fruit, whicli looks very omamentaL 
It is used for preserves. 

CardiosperiMuna. BaUoon Vine. A 
quick-growing climber, the seed* of which are 
in a pod, shaped like a miniatui-e balloon, 
therefore the name. 

Cobsea Seaudeus. Climbing Cobea. 
Large purple bell-shaped flowers. Should be 
sown in a hot-bed, and not kept too moist. 
Place the seed edgewise in the ground. Twenty 
feet high. January till April. 

Co uvot Villus major. Morning Glory. 
Well known vine with various handsomely 
colored flowers, of easy culture. Grows almost 
Anvwhere. Ten feet high. Febmary toil July. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



103 



Curcurbita. Ornamental Gourd. Mixed 
varieties or Ornamental Gourds of different 
shapes and sizes. February till May. 

Curcui'bitsi L.ag:c&tai*ia diiSeis. 

Sweet Gourd. A strong growing vine of which 
the young fruits are used like Squash. 
February till April. 



D«lic1lOS I^al>Ia)>. Hyacinth Beans. 
Free growing plant, with purple and white 
flowers. March till April. 

Ipovnsea ^uamoelit rosea. Eed 

Cypress Vine. Very beautiful, delicate foliage, 
of rapid growth, with scarlet flowers. 




Balloon Vine. 





Hyacinth Bean. 



Maurandia Barclayana. 



104 



KICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Aristolochia Elegans. 



Ip©Bsi8Ea*C|iiaiii®ciil; all>£i. White 
Cypress Yine. The same as the red variety. 

IposiaseaBoiia M®X. Large Flowering 
Evening Glory. A. vine of rapid growth, with 
beautiful blue and white flowers v/hich open 
in the evening. Twenty feet high. February 
till June. 

This is the Moon flower advertised in 
Northern catalogues as a novelty, not- 
withstanding the fact that it has been known 
here for the past centur3^ 

Liathyriis odos'ntais. Sweet Peas. 
Beautiful flowers of all colors, very showy. 
Good for cut flowers. Six feet high. Decem- 
ber till April. 

Maairairaclia Barclayana. Mixed 

Maurandia. A slender growing vine of rapid 
growth. Eose purple and white colors mixed. 
Ten feet high. February till April. 

Mina l«oI>ala,. This novelty, which is 
supposed to have first originated in Mexico, is 
one of the most beautiful climbing vines for 
ornamenting the garden. It closely resembles 
in growth and its three-lobed foliage the several 
sjpecies of the family of Ipomsea; but the 
flowers are altogether different. The flowers 
appear on fork-like racemes bearing them- 
selves upright or almost erect out of the dense 
and luxuriant foliage, and with their bright 
colors they present an extraordinary striking 
aspect. The buds are at first bright red, but 
change to orange yellow, and when in full 
bloom, to yellowish white. The most singular 
feature of this plant is, that it retains the 
racemes developed at first during the whole 
flowering season, the buds continuing to grow 
successively at the top of the racemes, while 



the lower flov^ers, after blooming for some 
time fade, bearing thus continually clusters of 
flowers from the bottom up to the highest vine 
of the plant. The oldest racemes attain a 
length of 15 to 18 inches, and at the end of 
the time of blooming they have produced from 
30 to 40 individual flowers on each raceme, of 




Mina Lobata. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



105 



wMeii G to 10 had been in full bloom at a 
time. This plant is a very rapid growing 
climber; mthiu three months the vine attains 
a height of 18 to 20 feet. It does well on 
sunny situations, and cannot be surpassed for 
coveiing arbors, trellises, etc., on account of 
its rapid growth and great dimensions. I 
have flowered this beautiful climber theUast 
three seasons, and can substantiate all what is 
claimed for it. It should be so\A'n early, in 
order to get it to perfection. 
Price, per packet, 25c. 

Maanoi'dica MriS^itssiBina,. Balsam 
Apple. A climbing pla,nt of very rapid growth, 
producing Cucumber like fruits, with warts on 
them. They are believed to contain some 
medicinal 'vdrtues. They are put in jars with 
alcohol and are used as a dressing for cuts, 
bruises, etc. 



I Ltiiflfa aciitang;iiEa. Dish Rag Vine. 

I A very rapid gro\\dng vine of the Gourd family. 

I When the fruit is dry, the fibrous substance, 

j which covers the seeds, can be used as a rag. 

I February till April. 

I l§erhiuin cdule. Vegetable Pear or 

i Mirliton. A rapid growing vine with grape- 

I like leaves, of which the fruit is eaten; there 

'' are two varieties, white and green. It has 

; only one seed, and the whole fruit has to be 

\ planted. 

TropSBOlmin iiiajiis. Nasturtium. 

, Trailing plants with elegant llowers of different 

; shades, mostly yellow and crimson, M'hich are 

: produced in great abundance. Four feet high. 

: February till April. 

T2iaia^toCB*|fia. Mixed Thunbergia. 
' Very ornamental vines, with ^^^ellow bell-shaped 
iiowers vrith dark eye. Six feet high. Febru- 
ary till May. 



BULBOUS ROOTS. 



Aan^iiaoiies;. Doiible flowering. Planted 
and treated the same as the Eanunculus. 
They are of great varieties in color. 

Double Dutch, 40 cts. per dozen. 

I>si2iiias. Fine double-named varieties. 
Plants so well known for their brilliancy, 
diversity of colors and profuse flowering 
qualities, that they require- no recommen- 
dation. They can be plantevi from February 
till May; they thrive best in rich loamy soil. 
They should be tied up to sta]?:es, v/hich ought 



to be driven into the ground before or when 
planting them. To have them flower late in 
the season they should be planted late in the 
spring, and the flower buds nipped off when 
they apT3ear; treated in this way, they will 
produce perfect flowers during fall. Undi- 
vided roots, $3.00 per dozen. 

The roots I offer are of the very best type, 
having taken special pains to discard varieties 
which did not flower well here. 





Dahlias. 



Anemones. 



106 



EICHA.RD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Lilium Lancifolium Rubrum. 



Double Hyacinth. 



Single Hyacinth, 



FOR THE SOUTHEKN STATES. 



107 



OBsidioluS* Hybrid Gladiolus. One of 
the best summer flowering bulbs; tbey have 
been greatly improved of late years, and almost 
every color has been produced; is tinged and 
blotched in all shades from delicate rose to 
dark vermillion. When planted at intervals 
during 'spring, they will flower at different 
times, but those that are planted earliest pro- 
duce the finest flowers. The roots should be 
taken up in the fall. 

Hybrids mixed, 1st choice, (extra) 10c. each; 
75c. per dozen. 

Hybrids white ground, Ist choice, 10c. each; 
75c. per dozen. 

Hybrids mixed, 50c. per dozen. 

Crioxiasias. These ^are really bulbous 
green-house plants, but they can be cultivated 
in pots and kept in a shady place in the garden, 
or window. They are very beautiful; color 
from white to dark violet and crimson. The 
leaves are velvety, and on some varieties very 
large. They should be planted early in spring ; 
require sandy ground and a good deal of moist- 
ure during flowering time. French Hybrids, 
strong bulbs, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 



Hyacinths, (dutch.) Double and single. 
The Hyacinth is a beautiful floweringJ)ulb, 
well suited for open ground or pot culture. 
They should be planted from October till 
February. If planted in pots it is well to keep 
in a cool, rather dark place, till they are well 
started, when they can be placed in the full 
light and sun. Double and single, 10 cents 
each; 75c. per dozen. Named varieties $1.00 
per dozen. 

]V:trcisst]8. Bulbs of the easiest culture, 
planted from November to January. 

Double white, sweet scented, 35c. per dozen. 

Paper White (Single,) Price, 5c. each; 50c. 
per dozen. 

Trumpet Major, (single) very fine, 50c. per 
dozen. 

LiiliiitM tig-a^miiBfii. Tiger Lily. A well 
known variety, very showy and of easy culture; 
10 cents each. 

JLiBiMiaa tigHiiissiu II. pi. This is a 
new variety; it is perfectly double, and the 
petals are imbricated almost as regularly as a 
camelia flower. Very fine, 15 cents each. 



JAPAi^ LILIES. 



liiBtlim auratUBSi. Golden Band Lily. 
This is a very handsome lily; the flowers are 
large and white, each petal having a yellow 
stripe. It is of easy culture. A loamy, dry 
soil suits it best, and planted one inch deep. 

The past season I had occasion to see several 
of this noble lily in bloom, and it is really fine; 
half a dozen flowers opening at the same time 
and measuring from six to nine inches across. 
It is very fragrant. I expect some fine bulbs, 
same as I had last year, imported direct from 
their native country. 

Flowering bulbs, 25c. each. 

lifliiu&ii Irmcifoliuiai a 5 ^ m eh. 

Pure vv'hite, Japan Lily, 30 cents each. 

LiillutM BaBiclfoSsuBQi rBtI>ruEii. 

White and red spotted, 15 cents each. 

£.ilii(siBi laaaclfoiiaisn roscum. 

Kose spotted, 15c. each. 



These Japan Lilies are very beautiful and 
fragrant. Should be planted from October 
till January Perfectly suited to this climate. 

PseOEffiia siaaCBfisls. Chinese orT her- 
baceous Pseonia. Herbaceous plants of diflier- 
ent colors and great beauty; they,,should be 
planted during fall in ; a shady situation, as 
they flower early in spring. If planted too 
late they will not flower perfectly; 25c. each. 

SiaiauiMCiilaas. Double'Flowering. The 
roots can be planted during fall and winter, 
either in the open ground or lin pots. The 
French varieties are more robust than the 
Persian, and the flowers are larger. The ground 
should be rather dr}^ and if planted in the 
open ground, it will be well to have the spot 
a little higher than the bed or border. 

French Ranunculus, 25c, per dozen. 





Ranuncuhis. 



Scilla peruviana. 



108 



KICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Scilla peruviaezR. These are green- 
liouse bulbs at the North, but here thej^ are 
hardy, and do well in the open ground. There 
are two varieties — the blue and white. They 
grow up a shoot, on the end of which the 
flowers appear, forming a truss. Plant from 
October till January. 25 cents each. 

Tuiaps. Double and single TuHps thrive 
better in a more Northern latitude than this, 
but some years the^^ flower well here, and as 
they are cheap, a fevf flowering bulbs will pay 
the small amount thej^ cost. They should not 



be planted later than December, and placed 
very shallow in the ground; not more than 
one-third of the bulb should be covered. When 
near flowering they require a good deal of 
moisture. Single and double, 50 cents per 
dozen. 

TMt>e roses. Double Flowering. They 
are ornamental for the garden, and very 
valuable for making bouquets, on account of 
their pure white color and great fragrance. 
Plant during the spring months.' Strong 
bulbs, 10 cents each; 75 cents per dozen. 




Double Tulip. 





Single Tulip. 



Tuberoses, double flowering. 



FOK THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



10^ 



THE NEW YORK SEED DRSLL. 

MATTHEWS' PATENT. 




I take pleasiire in calling your attention to a perfect Seed Drill. This Drill was invented 
and perfected by the father of the seed-drill business — Mr. E. Gr. Matthews. It has been his 
aim for years to make a perfect drill and do away with the objections found in all others, and in 
the New York he has accomplished it. Its advantages over other drills are as follows: 



1. Marker-bar under the frame, held by 
clamps, easy to adjust to any ^idth by simply 
loosening thumb nuts. 

2. Adjustable plow which opens a wide 
furrow, and canTae set to sow at any depth. 

3. Open seed conductor to show seed drop- 
ping. 

4. Bars in seed conductor, for scattering seed 
in wide furrows, prevents disturbing strong 
plants when thinning out — an important 
feature. 

5. Ridged roller. 

6. Dial plate in full sight of operator, and 



made of patent combination white metal which 
prevents rust. 

7. Dial plate set on fulcrum, and hence 
holds close up, preventing seed from spilling. 

8. It has a large seed-box with hinged cover. 

9. Machine will stand up alone when not 
in use, not liable to tip over. 

It is the SIMPLEST, MOST COMPACT and 
EASIEST DRILL TO HANDLE, being only 
32 inches long. 

It covers the seed better and runs very easy. 

Packed in crates for shipping. Weighs about 
45 pounds. Price, $10.00. 



MATTHEWS' HAND CULTIVATOR 



The Matthews' Hand Cultivatob is one of 
the best implements in use for weeding be- 
tween row crops, and for flat cultivation 
generally, and is an indispensable companion 
to the seed drill. 

It is thoroughly constructed throughout, 
very durable; easy to operate. A hoy can do 
as much with it as six r)ien with lioes. It spreads 
from 6 to 14 inches, and will cut all the ground 
covered, even when spread to its greatest ex- 
tent. Its teeth are of a new and improved 
pattern and thoroughly pulverize and mellow 
the soil. The depth of cultivating may be 
accurately gauged by raising or lowering the 
vrheels, which is quickly done hy the use of a 
thumb screw. 




Price, $6.00, boxed. 



110 



BicHABD teotscheb's ALMA>'AC a^d gaede:!? makfal 



THE CHAUTAUQUA CORN AND SEED PLANTER 



rrir% 




Patented April 4, iSS2, 

Unequalled in ^impUdty, JJurability and Efficiency. 

The Best is the Cheapest. Pesfectlt SnrpiJE:. SziiPLT Perfect. 



DTBECTIOI^S. 

To set the seed cup. — Loosen the set-screw 
and dxarw out the inside or narro"W" gange far 
enongh to drop the desired number of seeds. 
Then tighten the screw. For ordinary planting, 
only the narrow gauge should be moTed. In 
putting in phosphate, or a large quantity of 
seed, both the narrow and wide gauges should 
be drawn out together. By taking out the 
screws, the gauges may be drawn entirely out. 

in. experienced or careful hands the machine 
will plant perfectly in any kind or condition 
of soiL mellow or soddy, dry or wet. 

To opercde the planter. — Place the blades in 
the ground to the desired depth, in adTance of 
you, having the **step" to the front, as in the 
cut, without its touching the ground. Then 
pressing down forward on the handle, walk 
forward. The step will press on the ground 
and then the blades will be opened, the seed 
deposited in the ground and a charge taken for 



the next hi li. After walking past the planter, 
still pressing on the handle, lift it from the 
ground to the place for the next hill; as this is 
done the charge of seed will be he a t ed rattling 
down upon the steel blades, and the operator 
will know the seed is ready for the next hill. 
Use the planter as you would a cane, or as 
much so as possible. The blades must always 
enter the ground closed, and come out open. 

Its Efficiency. — ^We claim that the "Chau- 
tauqua" is not equalled as a dropper and 
planter. By actual trial in the field with a 
number of good planters, it has been shown 
that our machine will cover the seed in dif- 
ferent soils and at different depths, shallow or 
deep better than any other planter. Our new 
improved seed slide, having double gauges for 
adjusting the seed cup, enables the planter to 
drop accurately sviall or large seed in the quan- 
tity desired. 

Price, $2.25. 




FOR THE SOUTHBB^f STATES. 



Ill 



GARDEN IMPLEMENTS 




Loop Fastener, swing socket Scythe Snath. 




Weeding Hce and Rake Combiued. 



O. G. Hand Pruning Shear. 



Lang's Weeder. 



Dutch, or Scufiie Hoe. 




French Perfection Shear. 



Saynor's Pruuilig Knife, No. 192. 



Saynor'8 Pruning Knife, No. 194. 



112 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMAXAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Hedge Shear. 




Slide Pruniug Shear. 




Spading Fork, D Handle. 




;.rrry . r Transplanting Fork, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



113 



PRICE-LIST OF GARDEN IMPLEMENTS 




THE ECLIPSE SYRINGE 

PATENT API LIED FOR. 



DEAKIN'S HSVBPflOVED B??ASS CARDEI^ SYRINGES 

(AMERICAN.) 

ITie Eclipse Combined Syringe and Force 
i*ump supplies a long felt want for a perfect, 
easy working, entirely satisfactory Syringe. 

With a 5 incli stroke of the piston a contin- 
uous stream of water can be thrown forty feet 
with as little exertion as is necessary to work 
the smallest syringe. 

No packing is necessary, as by its peculiar 
construction, there is no possibility of its 
leaking. 

Dents in the outer barrel have no effect 
whatever upon its working parts. It is almost 
indestructible. 

By means of the 4 feet hose attachment, 
water and solutions of various kinds can be 
drawn from pail, tank or stream, thus ensur- 
ing a continuous flow, and making it very ef- 
ficacious in case of j&re. 

Attach the Elbow Joint and you have the 
most perfect apparatus for cleaning the under 
surface of the leaves of plants, etc. 

N. B, Keep the Piston well oiled. 

Price, Syringe with four ft. of hose complete, 
$6.00. Fixed Elbow Joint, 75 cents extra. 

Length of Barrel, 12 in, ; diam., 1. 



THE ECLIPSE SYRINGE. 

PATENT APPLIED FOR 





No. A. — Length of barrel, 12 inches; diameter, 
1 inch, with one stream and spray rose. 
Price, $2.25. 




No. 2, — Ladies' Syringe; length of barrel, llg inches, diameter Ij^^ inches; with one stream and 
two spray roses. The two roses, when not in use, are screwed on the sides of the 
barrel, as shown in cut. Price, $4. 25. 




No. 8. 



-Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, li inches. Best Plate Valve Syringe large size,^ 
with one stream, two spray roses and side pieces on barrel. Price, $6.50. 




No. 8. 



-Length of bai-rel, 18 inches; diameter, 1| inches. Best Conical Valve Syringe, extra 
large diameter and length of barrel, with cross handle and one spray rose. Price, $8.00. 



114 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




No. 11. — (Second Quality.) Lengt-h of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, Ih inches. Open Kose 
Syringe, full size. Two spray roses and one stream. Side attachments. Price, $4.25. 

Lewis^ Brass Syringe, spray only, 1| by 20 inches $1 75 

The Deakin's Syainges are known to be the best manufactured in Americ^o, and 
are far superior to the imported. 

Floral Tools. 

The Boys' Favorite— Hoe, Spade and Kake $2 0% 

No. 5. --4 pieces. Hoe, Eake, Spade and Fork (Ladies' Set) 1 Od 

Forlijs. 

Geaera Spading, Long Handled 7S 

" " " " (strapped) 80 

Spading Short Handled (strapped) 7oc, 1.00 and 1 25 

Manure Enterprise Long Handled, 4 tine (strapped) . 70 

Geneva " ^ " 4 tine " 70 

5 tine '• .. . 90 



Hoes. 



^ A. Lyndon's Louisiana, 



No. 00— Field . 

No. 0— " 

No. 1— " : 

No. 2— " 

No. 3— " .... 

W. A Lyndon's Louisiana, No. — Toy 

" " No. 1 — " 

No. 2- - ., . 

Carolina. No. 000— Field ... 

No. 00 " . . 

No. " 

No. 1 " 

Sandusky Tool Go's Planter's No. 2 , 

- ' " " No. 6 

No. 3/0 

No. 4 . . 

Two Pronged German Forged Steel 

Champion with handle 

Enterprise Socket with handle . ...... 

Two Pronged Weeding, ^ith handle 40c. and 

Four " " ■ " " 

Smith's Solid Shcink, No. 51, (Pointed 

Harper's Hoe and Hake, Combined 

Dutch or Scuffle, 5 inches, (Enghsh) 

7 " " 

" " with handle (American) 

Solid Shank Cotton, ^^ith handle, No. 00 . . 



Planter's 



No. 000. . 

No. 2.. 

No. 4 . 
1 with handle . 
2 
4 

7/0 
5/0 



Tiffin Patent Adjustable, No. 

No. 

No. 

German Pattern Garden, No. 

No. 

No. 3/0 with handle. 

No. 1/0 " " 

No. 2 " " 

No. 4 " " 

" Grub or Sprouting, No. 7/0 with handle. 

No. 5/0 " " . 

" Two Prong Grape with handle 



80 
85 

90 

1 00 
1 10 
75 
75 
80 
40 
45 
50 
55 
30 
40 
25 
35 
60 
75 
35 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
60 
60 
50 
45 
60 
65 
55 
65 
75 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 
60 
46 
50 
75 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 115 



H. «fc J. W. King's Pruning from 60c. to $1 25 

Saynor & Cooke's " from 75c. to 1 60 

Saynor & Cooke's Budding $1 00 and 1 40 

Geo. Wostenliolme's Pnining I. X. L 75 

Maher & Grosh's Budding, (Cocoa handle) ... 40 

(Ebony handle) 60 

*' " " (Ivory handle) 75 

£*otttto Hoolis, 

Long Handled, 4 tine, (Goose Necked) 40 

"6 tine 65c. and 70 

4 tine (flat) 40c. and 50 

" " 4 tine (round) ... 50 

" "4 tine. Extra Heavy 50 

Diaton'a 12 inch No. 7 ... 90 

Compass 12 inch 50 

Crescent 12 " 75 

Duplex 16 " 100 

Avery's Duplex 18 " 100 

Brown's 18 inch 76 

Enterprise, Cast Steel, 6 teeth 0-3© 

Geneva Tool Co's, Cast Steel, 10 teeth, (Braced) 45 

" 12 " " 50 

" 14 " " 60 

" 16 " " 70 

ChaUenge Rakes, (Malleable Iron) 10 teeth 30 

" 12 " . . 40 

" 14 •' , 45 

" 16 " . 50 

Wooden Head, (12 Iron teeth) 50 

Wooden Hay Eakes 25 

English Wrought-Iron Eakes (10 teeth) without handle 50 

" (12 " " " " " 

" (14 " " " -■•. 

" (16 - " " 

" (20 " " " 

Jsi^pacies. 

Ames' Long Handled (extra heavy) . 

Ames' " " Bright 

Ames' Bright, D Handle . 

Hadwins' Long Handled 

Johnson's " " Bright 

French Steel, Bright, without handles : $1 10 and 

Shovels. 

Eowland 8 D Handle, (square) 75 

Ames' Blight Long Handled, (round point) 9^ 

Hadwin's Long Handled, (round point) 65 

Hadwin's " " " (square) '. 65 

Handles for French Scythe Blades (with Eing and Wedge) 85 

No. 0, Plate Heel, American . . .\ . .... 65 

No. 00, Patent Loop Fastener ' 76 

Nicliles. 

EngUsh (welded), No. 2 40 

No. 3 45 

Scotch (riveted back,) No. 50 

No. 1 60 

English ' " No. 2 50 

No. 3 60 

French Sickles, No. 1 . . . ... 40 

No. 2 45 



60 


70 


80 


2 50 


1 10 


90 


90 


65 


70 


1 15 



116 KICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Hedge Shears, 8 inches . $1 75 

" 10 " .;... ",■.■;; 2 00 

Pruning Shears No. 1, Wiss. A 1 75 

" No. 2, " ."....■■■■■ 1 65 

" No. 3, " . 1 50 

" " No. 4 " 140 

Pruning Shears No. 2. Wiss. B . 1 65 

" No. 3, " .''. .. 1 50 

" No. 109, " Steel Springs, 9 in . 2 00 

" No. 110,: " '« " 10 " .2 25 

" No. Ill, " " " 11" 2 50 

No. 100, Lee's Cast Steel, 9 " ... .125 

10 " 1 50 

Pruning Shears, 0. G. No. 2, Saynor, Cooke & Ridal : 1 50 

No. 655, " '' " 7 in 1 65 

No. 655, " " '* 8" 180 

French Perfection. No. 1 2 75 

' No. 2 2 50 

No. 3 2 25 

Extra Heavy French, (Pat. Brass Spring) 3 00 

Slide Pruning Shear, No. 1 2 50 

" No. 2 3 00 

" No. 3 3 50 

No. 4 4 00 

Hey tlies. 

French, First Quality (polished), 22 inches '. ... 75 

24 " 85 

26 " 1 00 

Second Quality i^lue) 22 " 65 

" ~ " 24 " 75 

26 " 85 

28 " 1 00 

American Grass 75 

Blood's Champion Grass 75 

Bramble, 20 to 26 inches 75 

The French Scythe Blades are imported by me, and are of the best quality; none better 
ean be had. 

Woo da son's Bello^fvs. 

Double Cone (for insect po'^'der) 4 00 

Single " " " 100 

Atomizer (for liquid and powder) 2 00 

Pure Pyrethrum Powder for above bellows per bos, 50 

Watei-insj: Pots. 

6 Quai-ts, Japanned , 40 

8 " " 50 

10 " " .0 65 

12 " " 75 

16 " " 90 

Extra Heavy (hand made) No. 1, 20 Quarts 2 00 

No. 2, 16 " 175 

No. 3, 14 " 150 

No. 4, 10 " 125 

No. 5, 8 " : 100 

The latter are made of the best material, and have very fine rose heads; they are made by 
a mechanic who has been furnishing the vegetable gardeners for years with these pots, and has 
improved ujion tliem until they are perfect for the purpose. 

Miscellaneous. 

Excelsior Weeding Hooks 25 

American Trjinsplanting Trowels 10c. to 20 

English " "5 inch '. . . 35 

7 ^' 50 

DLston's Transplanting Trowels, (solid shank) 6 inch 45 

Enterprise " " " 7 '• 20 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



117 



Transplanting Forks, (Steel) $0 35 

(Malleablel ron) 20c. and 25 

English Bill or Briar Hooks 1 25 

Lang's Hand Weeder 25 

Toy Spades 40 

Toy Shovels 50 

Fork Handles 15 

Hoe Handles 10c. and 20 

Rake Handles 15 

Spade and Shovel Handles 20 

Trowbridge's Grafting Wax per lb. 40c. ; per 4 lb 15 

Scotch Whetstones .' 20 

American Indian Pond Whetstones 10 

American Berea Whetstone 10 

Darby Creek Whetstone 10 

French Whetstone IS 

Hammer and Anvil for beating French Scythes 1 50 

Rafiia, (for tymg) per 4 lb. 10c. ; per lb., 30 



Having received many enquiries on the culture of Alfalfa, I reprint the following letter, 
written by E. M. Hudson, Esq., a close observer on the subject, to give information thereon: 

ViniiA Feiedheum, 
Mobile County, Ala., September hh, 1878. 



Mr. R. Fbotscher, New Orleans, La. 

Dear Sir: — Your letter of the 3d inst. has 
just reached me, and I cheerfully comply with 
your request to give you the results of my ex- 
periments with Lucerne or Alfalfa, and my 
opinion of it as a forage plant for the South. 

I preface my statement with the observation 
that my experiments have been conducted on 
a naturally poor, piney woods soil (which 
would be classed as a sandj^ soil, varying in 
depth from six inches to one foot. But I have 
good red clay sub-soil, which enables the soil 
to retain the fertilizers applied to it, thus ren- 
dering it susceptible of permanent enrichiag. 

Three years since, when my attention was 
fli*st directed to Alfalfa, I sought the advice of 
the editor of the Journal of Progress, Professor 
SteUe, who informed me that, after attempt- 
ing for several years to cultivate it, he had de- 
sisted. He stated that the plant, at Citronelle, 
in this county, died out every summer, not 
being able to withstand the hot suns of our 
climate. Discouraged, but not dismayed, I 
determined to test the matter on a small scale 
at first. Having procured some seeds in March, 
1876, I planted them on a border in my gar- 
den, and gave neither manure nor work that 
season. The early summer here that year was 
very dry; there was no rain whatever from 
the firstof June to the 23d of July, and from 
the 2d of August to the 15th of November 
not a drop of rain fell on my place. Yet, dur- 
ing all this time, my Alfalfa i-emained fresh, 
bloomed, and was cut two or three times. On 
the 1st of November I dug some of it to exam- 
ine the habit of root growth, and to my aston- 
ishment found it necessary to go twenty-two 
inches below the surface to reach anything 
like the end of the top roots. At once it was 
apparent that the plant was, by its very habit 
of growth, adapted to hot and dry climates. It 
is indeed a "child of the sun." 

Encouraged by this experiment, in which I 
purposely refraiaed from giviag the Alfalfa 



any care beyond cutting it occasionally, last 
year I proceeded on a larger scale, planting 
both spring and fall, as I have done again this 
year, to ascertain the best season for putting 
in the seed. My experience teaches that ther« 
is no jjreference to be given to spring sowings 
over those of autumn, provided only, there b© 
enough moisture in the soil to make the seed 
germinate, which they do more quickly and 
more surely than the best turnips. Two win- 
ters have proved to me that the Alfalfa re- 
mains green throughout the winter in this 
latitude, twenty-five miles north of Mobile, 
and at an altitude of 400 feet above tide-water. 
Therefore I should prefer fall sowkig, which 
will give the first cutting from the 1st of March 
to the 1st of April following. This season my 
first cutting was made on the 1st of Apiil; and 
I have cut it since regularly every four or six 
weeks, according to the weather, to cure for 
hay. Meanwhile a portion has been cut al- 
most daily for feeding green, or soiling. Used 
in the latter way {for under no circumstances 
must it ever be pastured), I am able to give 
my stock fiesh, green food, fully four weeks 
before the native wild grasses commence to 
put out. I deem it best to cut the day before, 
what is fed green, in order to let it become 
thoroughly wilted before using. Mter a large 
number of experiments with horses, mules, 
cattle and swine, I can aver that in no in- 
staace, from March to November, have I 
found a case when any of these animals would 
not give the preference to Alfalfa over every 
kind of grass (also soiled) known ia this re- 
gion. And, while Alfalfa makes a sweet and 
nutritious hay eagerly eaten by all kinds of 
stock, it is as a forage plant for soiling, which 
is available for at least nine months in the 
year, that I esteem it so highly. The hay w 
easily cured, if that which is cut in the fore- 
noon is thrown into small cocks at noon, then 
spread out after the dew is off next morning, 



U8 



BICHAED FEOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



STumed for an hour, and at once hauled into 
the barn. By this method the leaves do not 
fall oS, -vrhich is sure to be the case, if the 
Alfalfa is exposed to a day or two cf hot sun- 
shine. 

It has been my habit to precede the Alfalfa 
"ffith a elepji crop— usually Eutabagas, after 
which I sow clay peas, to be turned in about 
the last of July.' About the middle of Sep- 
tember or later I have the land plowed, the 
turn-plow being followed by a deep sub-soil- 
plow or scooter. After' this the land is ferti- 
lized and harrowed until it is thoroughly pul- 
Terized and all lumps broken up. The ferti- 
lizers employed by me are SOU lbs. line bone- 
dust (phosphate of lime) and lOGO lbs. cotton 
seed hull ashes per acre! These ashes are very 
rich in potash and phosphates containing 
nearly 45 per cent, of the phosphate of lime — 
the two ai-ticles best adapted to the wants of 
this plant. I sow all my Alfalfa with the 
Matthews' Seed Drill, in rows 10 inches apart. 
Broad-cast would be preferable, if the land 
was perfectly free from grass and weeds; 
but it takes several years of clean culture to 
put the land in this condition, sowing in drill 
is practically the best. No seed sower known 
to me can be compared with the Matthews' 
Seed Drill. Its work is evenly and regularh' 
done, and with a rapidity that is astcnishing; 
for it opens the drill to any desired depth, 
drops the seed, covers and rolls them, and 
marks the line for the nest drill at one opera- 
tion. It is simple and durable in its structure, 
and is the greatest labor-saving machine of its 
kind ever devised for hand-work. 

TMien my Alfalfa is about three inches high, 
I work it with the Matthews' Hand Cultivjitor. 
First, the front tooth of the cultivator iis taken 
out, by which means the row is straddled and 
aU the grass cut cut close to the plant; then 
the front tooth being replaced, the cultivator 
is passed between the rows, completely clean- 
ing the middles of all foul growth. As often 
as requii-ed to keep down gTass, until the Al- 
falfa is large enough to "cut, the Matthews' 
Hand Cultivator is passed between the rows. 

Alfalfa requires three years to reach pei-fec- 
tion, but even the first year the yield is larger 
than most forage plants: and after the second 



it is enormous. The land must, however, be 
made 7"('c/( at first; a top-dressing every three 
years is all that will thereafter be required, 
the seed must be very lightly covered, and 
should be rolled, or brushed in, if not sowed 
with Matthews' Seed Sower. 

"Whenever the plant is in bloom it must be 
cut; for. if the seed be left to mature, the 
stems become hard and woody. Also when- 
ever it turns yellow, no matter at what age, it 
must be cut or mowed; for the yellow color 
shows the presence of some disease, or the 
work of some small insect, both of which 
seems to be remedied by mowing promptly. 
My experience leads me to the conclusion that 
fully five tons of cured hay per acre may be 
counted on if proper attention be given to 
deep plowing, sub-soiling, feitiliztng and clean- 
liness of the soil. These things are indispens- 
able, and without them no one need attempt 
cultivate Alfalfa. 

In conclusion, I will remark that I have 
tried the Lucerne seed imported by you from 
France, side by side with the Alf.alf a seed sent 
me by TnimbuU A: Co., of San Francisco, and 
I can not see the shghtest difi'erence in ap- 
pearance, cha.racter, quantity or quality of 
yield, or hardiness. They are identical: both 
have germinated equally well, that is to say, 
perfectly. 

In closing, I can not do better than refer 
you to the little tieatise of Mr. C. W. Howard' 
entitled: *'A Manual of the Grasses and For- 
age Plants at the South." Mr. Howard, among 
the very first to cultivate Lucerne in the 
South, gives it the preference over aU other 
forage plants whatever. My experience con- 
firms all that Mr. Howard claims for it. Cer- 
tainly, a plant that lasts a generation is worthy 
cf the bestowal of some time, patience and 
money to realize what a treasure they can se- 
cure for themselves. I confidently beheve 
that in years from this date the Alfalfa will 
b e generally cultivated throughout the entira 
South. 

I am. respectfullv vours. 

' ' E. M. HUDSON, 
CounsellcT at La%», 
20 Carondelet Street New Orleanj*. 



JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE. 

This tuber is well known, and ha,s been described by me in my former Almanacs. It in 
»sed for the table, also for stock feed. It does better in a 'rich loam; should be i^lanted and 
•mltivated like potatoes. They yield very heavy. 

Price, per bushel, $2.50; per gall., 35 cents. 



Louisiana, July 2S, 1890. 



I have been using your seeds for the last 
three years &iid find them better than any I 
have ever used. Your seeds always come up 
and make A No. 1 show in my garden; my 
vegetables are praised by every one who sees 
them, and that. I must admit, is owing to the 
good quahty of your seeds. 

J. ALBERT VERKET. 



LouisiA>,-A, March 9, 1896. 
Your seed are spendid; they never fail to 
come up in any instance, producing choice 
vegetables also. 

MRS. J. OiLER LAN-DRY. 

Texas, January 13, 1890. 
Have alwavs had good results with vour 
seeds. ^ THOS. McCLANAHAN. 



FOK THE SOUTHEIIN STATER. 



119 



DESCRIPTIVE LIST 

OF SOME VARIETIES OF THE SORGHUM FAMILY. 



Ad a forage plant for early cutting, to be fed 
to stock, I do not think that anything is equal 
t.> t'ae Amber Sorghum, such as I have been 
selling for years, imported from Kansas. After 
several cuttings, the branching varieties of 
Sorghum, also called Millo Maize, may be pre- 
ferable, but more so for seed than forage. — 
The Teosinte will give more fodder than any 
of the Sorghums. Some varieties not before 
described and rather new here are the following: 

Yellow Millow Maize, or Yellow Branching 
Dhouro, grows same as the White Branching 



kind. The onlj' diiierence exists in the size of 
the seed, which is twice the siiie of the white 
variety. — It is said to be somewhat ejirlier, 
seeds planted in April will ripen seed in July. 
— On account of its branching habit this grain 
should be planted in four or five foot rows, 
and two to three feet in the drill, according to 
the strength of the land, two plants in a hill. 
The cultivation is like corn. 

Price, 10c. per lb. ; postage extra, 8c. per 
lb. by mail — 15 lbs. $2.00 by Express or 
Steamer. 



KAFFIR CORN 



This grain was distributed in small quanti- 
ties from the Georgia State Department of 
Agriculture in 1878, and in the hands of Br. 
J. H. Watkins, of Palmetto, Campbell County, 
Gau, it has been preserved and fully developed, 
find was first brought to public notice through 
him in 1885. The seed offered for sale is from 
his own growing, the genuine and pure stock ; 
crop of 1890. 

It is a variety of Sorghum, none Saccharine, 
and distinctly difcering in habit of growth and 
other characteristics from all others of that 
class. The plant is low, stocks perfectly erect, 
the foliage is wide, alt6rnating closely on either 
side of the stalks. 

It does not stool from the root, but branches 
from the top joints, producing from two to 
four heads of grain from each stalk. The 
heads are long, narrow and perfectly erect, 
well filled with white grain, which at maturity 
is slightly flecked with red or reddish brown 
spots. Weight, 60 lbs. per bushel. 

The average height of growth on good 
strong land, 5i to 6 feet; on thin land, 4| to 5 
feet. The stalk is stout, never blown about 
by winds, never tangles, and is always man- 
ageable, easily handled. A boy can gather the 
grain heads or the fodder. The seed heads 
grow from 10 to 12 inches in length, and pro- 
duct of gi-ain on good land easily reaches 50 to 



It has the quality common to many Sorg- 
hums of resisting drought. If the growth is 
checked by want of moisture, the plant waits 
for rain, and then at once resumes the pro- 
cesses, and in the most disastrous sejxsons has 
not failed so far to make its crop. On very thin 
and worn lands, it yields paying crops of gTain 
and forage, even in dry seasons in which com 
has utterly failed, on the same lands. 

The whole stalk, as well as the blades, cures 
into excellent fodder, and in all stages of its 
growth is available for green feed, cattle, mules 
and horses being equally fond of it, and its 
quality not surpassed by any other known 
variety. If cut down to the ground two or 
more shoots spring from the root and the 
growth is thus maintained until checked by 
frost. 

The Kafiir Corn may be planted in the lat- 
ter part of March, or early in April. It bears 
earlier planting than other Millets or Sorg- 
hums. It should be put in rows not over 
three feet apart, even on best land, and ^ 
bears thicker planting than any other rarie^ 
of Sorghum; should be massed in the drill 
on good land, for either green or forage 
purposes, and also on thin land, if forage 
mainly is desired. No plant can equal it for 
quality and quantity of grain and forage on 
thin lands. Use 3 to 5 lbs. of seed per acre. 
Price of seed, 10c. yer lb. ; postage extra, 8c. 
per lb. by mail; lots of 15 lbs. for $1.00. 



60 bushels per acre 

TEOS8^STE. 

( lieana luxurians.J 
This is a forage plant from Central America. ! seed to germinate. He prefers planting in 
it resembles Indian Corn in aspect and vege- i rows, as giving a heavier crop than when in 
tation; but produces a great number of shoots j hills, and as its growth during the first month 
3 to 4 yards high; it is perennial, but only in j is very slow, he gives it a good hoeing for its 
such situations where the thermometer does first cultivation, using only the plow there- 



not fall below freezing point. Cultivated as an 
annual, it will yield a most abundant crop of 
excellent green fodder. 

Considering the Teosinte a superior forage 
plant, the following extract of a letter from 
Mr. Chas. Debremond of Thibodeaux, La., 
will give additional light on the cultivation of 
same. — In describing his experience with Teo- 
sinte, he advises plantir g the seed in Febru- 
ary, so as to have the plants up early in 
March, as it takes some 14 or 20 days for the 



after. 

He also advises cutting the stalks for green 
food when about 4 feet high, and specially 
recommends cutting them close to the ground, 
as tending to make a much heavier second 
growth than when cut higher. His horses, 
mules and cattle eat the stalks with great 
avidity, lea\'ing no part unconsumed, and pre- 
fer it much to green Indian Corn or Sorghum. 

Price, $1.00 per lb. ; 30c. per J lb., 15c. per 
oz. Postage prepaid. 



120 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC! AND GARDEN MANUAL 



LIST OF A FEW VARIETIES OF ACCLIMATED FRUIT TREES, 

SUITABLE FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 

HOW TO PLANT TKEES. 



Although there are numerous books and 
papers published on arboriculture, giving ne- 
cessary informations how to plant trees, and yet 
I am so often asked by some of my customers 
how to plant and prepare the soil for fruit 
trees, I deem it necessary to give here some 
short instructions. 

Make the ground thorotighly mellov/ at least 
15 inches deep and 3 or "4 feet wide each way, 
if holes are to be dug; thorough plowing of 
entire plat is preferable if it can be done. 
Prune the tree close; straighten out roots 
«venly, having the tree standing the same 



depth it was in Nursery; work fine, mellow 
soil (but no manure) among the roots, and 
w^hen they are all covered an inch or two, press 
the soil very firmly down with the foot or a 
broad ended maul, after which fill up evenly 
with loose soil, over which place a mulch of 
rotten straw, or manure, 3 or 4 inches deep, 
extending 3 feet every way from the tree. 
Whether the mulch is put on or not, keep the 
soil well cultivated about the tree. In this 
climate all trees should be headed low and 
leaned a little to the northwest when plani«d. 




^i 



:# 







Le Conte Pear. 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



121 



DISTANCES APAET TO PLANT TREES, VINES, Etc. 



Peaches, Plums, Standard Pears, Apricots, 
in ligbit soil, 16 to 18 feet; in strong soil, 18 
to 20 feet each way. 

Figs should be planted 20 to 24 feet apart. 

Dwarf Pears, Quinces, etc., 10 to 15 feet 
apart. 

Jajjanese Persimmons, 10 to 12 feet. 

Grapes, such as Delaware, Ives Seedling, 



which are of slow growth, G to 8 feet r^part 
each way. 

Thrifty gi'owers, like Concord, Triumph, 
Goethe, etc., 8 to 10 feet apart. 

Herbemont, Cynthiana, etc., which are the 
most rapid growers, 12 feet apart, in rows 8 
feet wide. 



DIRECTIONS FOR PLANTING LE CONTE PEAR TREES. 



Plant the tree up to the collar in a large 
hole, filling it with a rich loam in which 
some fertilizer has been mixed; press the earth 
in firmly around the roots, using wator in dry 
breather; trim back one-half of each year's 
growth till the fourth year, thea trim only in- 



growing and chafing limbs w^ith a vi«w to 
spreading the head. Plant thirty feet eridh 
way. Clean culture and broad-cast manuring 
are best. For best results plant large one y&vr 
trees , and only those grown from cutting.'^. 




Kieffer Pear. 



1'^ 



KICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



LE CONTE PEAR. 



Tliis new Southem pear is as vigorous in 
j*i-owth as the China Sand, and is an enormous 
baarer. The fruit is large, pale yellow, juicy 
melting, and of good quality, doing better in 
the South than elsewhere. It bears transpor- 
tation well, and commands the highest prices 
at the North. Time of ripening begins about 



the middle of July. So far, this pear has ne.Tei- 
been known to bhght. It promises to "be tb* 
pear for the South. 

Rooted one year old trees, 4 to 6 feet, tM)c. 
each; $2.00 per dozen; 2 year old trfe^ 6 t<f> 
8 feet, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozeiL 



KBEFFER'S HYBRID PEAR, 



A variety from Philadelphia; a hybrid be- 
tween the China Sand and Bartlett, both of 
which it resembles in wood and foliage. It 
Liis the vigor and prodiictiveness of its Chi- 
nese Parents. Fruit large and handsome; 
bright yellow and red cheek; flesh tender, 



juicy and well flavored. It comes into beariiig; 
at' an early age. Ripens end of September, or- 
beginning of October. It is an excellent Hort 
for preserving. 

One year old trees, branched, and fine, 20e. 
each; $2.00 per dozen. 



BARTLETT PEAR. 



This well-known variety one of the finest 
pears in cnltivation, has been successfully 
cultivated here; but occasionally it hasbhght- 



ed. Since the introduction of the LfsO/nte, 
trials have been made with success, that in hj 
grafting this, and other fine varieties, upon 




Bartlett Pear. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



133 



^e LeConte; — by so doing, the trees are im- 
parted with vigor of the latter, growing 
stronger, and makingfiner and healthier trees. 
I oifer trees grafted on the LeConte Stock, for 
Bfde. 



One year old trees, 3-4 feet^ 25c. each; $2.50 
per dozen. 

Two years old, well branched, 6-6 feet high» 
35c. each ; $3. 50 per dozen. 



DUCHESS D'ANCOULEME PEAR. 

Another popular variety which does well in this section. — On LeConte Stock. 
Two years old, well branched, 30c. each; $3.00 per dozen. One year old, 25c. each; 
per dozen. 

HOWELL PEAR. 



$2.60 



One of the best for here. Tree is an up- 
light free grower; it is an early and profuse 
feaarer. 



Two years old, on LeConte Stock, 30o. each; 
$3.00 per dozen. One year old, 25c. each; 
$2.50 per dozen. 



CLAPP'S FAVORITE PEAR. 

A large new pear, resembling the Bartlett; but does not possess its musky flavor. Fin* 
texture; juicy, with a rich, delicate vinous flav6r. It is very productive. On Leocnte Stock. 
Two years old, 30c. each; $3.00 per dozen. One year old, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 

^ JEFFERSON PEAR. 



Another blight proof pear, very distinct in 
habit and growth from other varieties under 
©ultivation. Cannot be stated yet under what 
particular type or species it should be classed. 

It ripens in Central Mississippi from the 
Ijgt-lOth of June, is in the market with the 
earliest peaches, and brings the highest prices. 



It is above medium size, color bright yello^f, 
with a bright, deep crimson cheek. It is ripa 
and marketed before Leconte is ready to ship. 
It is poor in flavor. 

Price, two year old trees, 5-6 feet, 30c. eaoh; 
$3.00 per dozen. One year old, 25c. each; 
$2.50 per dozen. 



\f WBLD GOOSE PLUM. 

A native variety from Tennessee, where it is highly esteemed for market. 
grower; the fruit is large and of good quahty. 
Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 



It is a strong 




Wild Goose Plum. 



124 



KICHARD FROTSOHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




V4% 









FOK THE SOUTHERN HTATIiS. 



125 



8DAHO REAP?. 



This uew Peai- is described in the lieport of 
the Coniinissioner of Agriculture of the United 
States for 1888, jxs follows: 

"Size of fruit, from 4 toli inches in diame- 
ter; shape a little flattened, tapering slightly 
both ways from the centre, quite iixegular, 
depressed at the stem; surface rough and 
uneven, yellow or straw color, with a faint 
blush or brownish-red on the sunny-side, and 
a few bronzed blotches ; dots miuTite, dark 
and very numero\is; basin deep, Haring; very 
irregular or ribbed, and thiclily covered with 
fine brown dots; cavity medium abrupt, ir- 
regular; stem stout and rather long; core very 
small; seeds few; flesh almost white, fine- 
grained, buttery, melting, lacks the grit so 
often found in pears; flavor sweet to mild 
sub-acid, rich and aromatic, juicy; quality 
very good; season, September in Idaho." 

From a great number of testimonials of the 
best horticulturists of this country as to the 
quahty of this pear, we select the following: 

Mr. P. J. Berkmans, President of the Amer- 
ican Pomological Society, writes as follows: 
Augusta, Ga., Oct. 8, 1887. 
"Dear Sirs: — I received the specimen of the 
Idaho Pear in excellent condition, and beg to 
say that its quality is remarkable for such a 
large fruit. 

Basing my opinion upon the scale of points 
which govern friiit tests, I would class the pear 
as very good. There is fine grain, abundant 
juice, good flavor and especially large size. 
Yours respectfully, 

P. J. BERKMANS." 



The well-known and veteran horticulturist, 
P. Barry, speaks of the Idaho Pear, thus: 

Rochester, N. Y., Get. 15, 1887. 

Dear Sirs: — Yours of the 6th came duly to 
hand, also the pear, in excellent condition, for 
which I am much obliged. 

It is large, over 11 inches in cii'cumference 
and weighs 12 ounces. Form, nearly round, 
this specimen particularly; skin yellow, flesh 
melting, juicy, sUghtly vinous, rich quality, 
best. The round form in pears is not so de- 
sirable as the pyriform, but this is undoubt- 
edly a valuable fruit, considering its size, 
quahty and season. When I first saw it, I 
thought it resembled very closely the Easter 
Beurre, and the wood looks a good deal lil^e 
that variety, but the Easter Beurre would not 
be ripe jet, even in your climate, we think. 



I I have several grafts growing on a beaiiug 

I tree. 

j Yours truly, 

P. BARRY. 



At the meeting of the American Pomologio&i 
Society, in 1889, at Ocala, Florida, the com- 
mittee upon native fruits, Dr. F. M. Hexamer, 
of New York, chairman, reported upon ' ihift 
pear, as follows: 

"The most notcM'orthy new fruit which has 
come to the notice of your committee is the 
Idaho Fear. It is a chance seedling, originat- 
ing near Lewiston, Idaho. In size, general 
appearance and aroma, it resembles the crosses 
of the Chinese Sand Pear, but its eating 
quality is far superior to that of any of thia 
class known in cultivation. It is very large 
and handsome; irregular globular, somewhat 
depressed. The cavity of the fruit is verj 
irregular, basin shiillow and pointed; c(dyx 
very small and closed; core very small; aMn 
golden yellow with many russety spots; flesh 
melting, juicy, with a sprightly, vinous, deli- 
cious flavor; season, Sei^tember and Gctobdr. 
So far it has not fruited oiitside of its native 
locality, where the tree has withstood a tom- 
perature of thirty degrees below zero." 

This season for the first time, trees of the- 
Idaho Pear, grafted on Le Conte trees grown 
from cuttings, are offered for sale. All trees 
offered by me M^ere propagated by E. M. 
Hudson, Esq., of New Orleans, on his farm in 
Mobile County, Ala., under contract with the 
Idaho Pear Company, are warranted to be true 
as represented, and will bear the seal and 
patented trade-mark of the Idaho Pe/tr Company. 
Having been constituted sole agent of the 
Idaho Pear Company for the sale of these 
trees, thus propagated, for the States of 
Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and 
Texas, I shall be able to deliver the same in 
limited numbers after December 1st, 18i)0, at 
the following prices : 

Trees from 5 to 7 feet high, each $2 50' 

Trees from 3 to 5 feet high, each 2 00- 

No trees t»y iisail. 

Descriptive pamphlets, illustrated, will be 
mailed free to all applicants. 

This pear is certainly worthy of a trial hj 
every person interested in raisijig fine fruit. 

Idaho Pear Trees on their own stock, one 
year old, with seal, can be supplied to th© 
trade at wholesale prices, which will be given 
on apphcation. 



"^ATSUMA OR BLOOD PLU?^. 



This is another variety from Jap.m; has 
been fruited in Calif orni x two years ago. The 
following is the description given bj'- the intro- 
ducer, JV'Lr. Luther Burbank: "It is nearly 
six weeks earher than the Kelsey, firm flesh; 
much larger, of finer quality, color and form. 
It is an early and enormous bearer, and the 



trees grow with more vigor than any of the 
other varieties of Japan Plums I h ive fruited 
here. The seed is also the smallest yet seen.'^ 

The flesh is dark red, sol id» color from skin 
to pit, firm, nither juicy, and of good flavor. 

Price, 50c. each; So. 00 per dozen. 



126 



RICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



1^ 



MARIANNA PLUM. 



A new plum fi'oin Texas, supposed acci- 
deaital seedling of tlie Wild Goose. It is a 
rapid grower. Grows from cuttings; it never 
Uirows uj) any suckers or sprouts. Fruit as 
large, good and handsome as the Wild Goose; 
one to two weeks earlier; hangs on better, 
ahips well; ripens and colors beautifully, if 



picked a few days previously. It is the best 
of the Chickasaw type. This variety and the 
Wild Goose should be fertilized by the com- 
mon Chickasaw kind to have it bear well. 

Price, 5-6 feet high, 25c, each; $2.50 per 
dozen. 




Mariunnu Pluni. 



FOK THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



19V 



V, 



KELSEY'S JAPAN PLUM 



'Phe Prunus Domestica, or European varie- 
iie:% have proven worthless in the South gen- 
cjr>Uy. The above will take their place prom- 
iidiig good results, being of Asiatic origin. 
Tha Kelsey Plum is from two to two and a 
half inches in diameter, heart-shaped, rich 
yellcvf, with purple cheek. Parties who 
havo been fruiting it here in the South pro- 
aounoe it the most magnificent plum they 
have seen; it weighs from 4 to 6 ounces. It 



excels all other plums for canning and dryinj?. 
and will carry for a long distimce better than 
any other kind. Matures middle of AugUKi 
to September. It has fruited in this neigh- 
borhood this past season; it is a most doii- 
cious fruit, and everyone who plants fruit 
trees should not fail to plant some. I coia- 
sider it a great acquisition. Price, 25c. ea<?h : 
$2.50 per dozen. 




OCAN AMD BOTAI^ PLUmS. 



Two other Japan varieties. They are vigor- 
oufi, handsome growers; branches smooth 
^it]-; rich light green foliage. 

''I'he Og'sm is a large yellow variety, 
ripoos early, and is very sweet. The Sotam 



I is very lai'^e, reddish blue; a good ke-?piQs: 
j and shipping fruit. Japan fruit does wejl 
} here generally; everybody should try a f(^w ctf 

these plums. 
1 Price, 30c. each; S3. 00 per dozen. 



V 



APRSCOT PLUM 

(PPtUNUS SIMONI.) 



A new plum from North China. It was 
fruliied for the fir&t time in 1885, by a well- 
Irar^wn nurseryman in Texas. The fruits, when 
lipcdiing, shine like apples of gold, and be- 
ootne of a rich vermillion when ripe. It is 
rerj firm and mealy, and equal to any plum ; 



has never been attacked by the Cutculio. It 
will carry any desired distiince. 

Tree very thrifty, upright; early andabnud- 
ant bearer. 

Price, one year old trees, 30c. each; ft^.B® 
per dozen. 



128 



RICHAKD FKOTSCHEK S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANDAL 



I have a line assortment of 



FEACH TREES. 

^outliern grown Trees, selected from the well-knoMn Nurseries 



ot Gaines, Coles & Co. They 

FEEE STOKES. 

Jessie M.t?i'3'. 
.VAiosdefi. 

,^ Early £.oiis^e. 



consist of the following varieties, viz. : 



V 



rSEE STONES. 



Stusisp tlie ^^osid. 
,'^TIaiiirtoes'. 
,^02d !?lixoM. 

'Crawfordl's L.ate. 

VPacQisel's L.ate. 
vlLacfiy Parham. 



vMoiiaitaisa liose. 
V Hofiiey. 
'^> t^oster. 
VCrawford's Sarfly. j 

VAsEBelia. ' 

As they follow in the list they ripen in succession. 
Price, 25c. each; $2,50 per dozen. 



CUKG STONES. 

X General Lee, 
Sfoaiewal! Jackson. 

;^08<1 MixoM. 
Lieiaion. 
r'liealiB. 

VjVix ^ Ssile f^atc. 
y StiiisoBi's October. 
\* BiatBer. 
'^Cliinese. 



N PEEN-TO O^ FLAT PEACH OF CHINA, 



This remarkable Peach is very popular in 
Florida, whei'e it thrives admirably and pro- 
duces magnificent crops of fruit. Fruit 22 
inches in diameter, very fiat, skin pale greenish 
^rhite, with red cheek; pealing readily at ma- 
turity, flesh fine grained, juicy and smelting 
\rith almond aroma, quahty best. It colors 



some time before being ripe, and should remain 
on the tree until fully matured, and may then 
be shipped to distant markets with perfect 
safety, Eipens in Florida about the 1st to 15th 
of May, 

Pric«, 25c. each; $2,50 per dozen. 



CRAPE VINES. 

Have some selected varieties for the table, and for making wine. The following is a list of 



them, viz.: 

Cbampion* Large black, poor quality 
but sells readily, being the earliest in the 
Hiarket. 

2 years old, 10c. each; $1.00 per dozen. 

V Mooi'e's Early. Large size and very 
\early, good for table use. Price, 20c. each, 

Delaware. Well known. Eegarded as 
best American Grape; it does well in the South, 
with good soil and high culture. Price, 20c. 
s^ch; $2.00 per dozen. 

Ooethe. Light pink; very fine for table 
a so. It is the best of the Roger's hybrids. 
,^ Price, 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

V T ri u ni p li . This is a late variety ; bunches 
very large, golden when fully rij^e, fine as best 
foreign, and sells equally well; melting pulp, 
Hmall seeds, vigorous as Concord, of which it 
is a hybrid seedling. Rarely it rots; stands 
pre-eminently at the head as a late table grape, 
i'rice, 20c. each. 



^e 



^T¥orton's Tjrg^jiiia. An unfailing, 
never rotting, red wine grape of fine quality. 
Price, 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen, 

*' Cyiitliiana. Very much like the latter: 
..same price, 

Coaicord. Early; very popular; good for 
market. Some years it rots, 10c. each; $1.00 
er dozen. 

Ives. Ripens with the Concord. Good 
for wine; vigorous and productive. 10c. each: 
$1. 00 per dozen. 

^HerbeiBioaat (lilcKee),. A most pop- 
ular and successful red or purj^le grape in the 
south ; exe^^llent for table or wine. McKee is 
identical with it. 

Price, 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Prices for other Nursery Stock will be given 
on application. 



^JAPAN PERSIMMON. 

This new valuable frnit has been fruited for the last few years. Most varieties are of ex- 
cellent quality; twice and three times as large as the native kind; very attractive when the fruit 
i.s ripe. I had some which weighed a pound, very sweet and of a most delicious flavor. Ar they 
;iie of easy culture and do well here, it is a profitable fruit to gi'ow. 

Assorted named varieties. Price, 50c. each; $5.00 per dozen, large size.- 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



129 




\ 



Japan Persimmon. (Hachlya.) 



CELESTE OR CELESTIAL FBC. 



I have only a limited snpply of one year old 
tj-ees of this variety. They have been raised 
from cuttings in a sandy loam ; are well rooted, 
and raised to a single stem ; not in sprouts, as 
is often the case, when raised from suckers 
taken ofE from old trees. 

The cultivation of this fruit has rather been 
neglected, which should not be so, as the fig 
is always a sure crop, with very little attention. 



It has commenced to be an article of com- 
merce, when preserved; shipped from here it 
sells quite readily North, put up in that way. 
The Celeste is the best for that purpose, not 
liable to sour like the yellow skinned varieties, 
and sweeter than other dark skinned kinds. 

Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per, doz.; packed and 
delivered on steamboat, or R. R. depot. 



NEW WHITE ADRIATIC FIC. 



This valuable variety has been introduced 
into this country from South Italy; where it 
is esteemed as the finest of all Figs. The Tree 
attains an enormous size and is an immense 
bearer, bearing more than any other variety 
known. 

The fruit is of the finest quality; the skin 
is thin like paper, thinnest at the base and not 
like most other Figs thicker at the point. The 
pulp is very sweet, with small seeds, without 
u hollow space in the centre; in fact, the 
whole fruit is one solid pulp. 



I The size of the fruit is larger than the whit.c 
i Smyrna Fig and a great deal finer in flavor. 
It Isegins to ripen in July, and Figs ripen 
from that time continually until frost. The 
i princii>al crop is in August. 
j This variety is extensively grown in Italy 
I for drying, and the finest dried Figs of com- 
I merce are obtained from it. Since our climate 
I is well adapted to its culture it will in timtt 
[ prove the most valuable of all Figs. 
j Price, 50c. each; $5.00 per dozen. 



130 



\ 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



NEW POMEGRANATE "SPAi^iSH RUBY.'' 



This new variety of the well-known Pome- I sweet. The Spanish Enby is a tine grower 



granate is one of the most beautiful and finest 
of all fruits of our temperate climate. Fruit 
very large, as large as the largest Apple; eye 
very small, skin thick and smooth, pale yellow 
with crimson cheek; meat of the most beauti- 
ful crimson color, highly aromatic and very 



V 



SUCKER STATE 

We have various sorts of soil in Louisiana, 
and the Strawberry suitable to and succeeding 
equally well in poor or rich land, can only be 
determined by practical experiment. 

There are but few varieties which adapt 
themselves to all soils and latitudes, hence 
the importance of planting those v/hich ex- 
perienced fruit growers have tested and found 
profitable. A Strawberry having all the good 
qualities, has not, and perhaps never will be 
discovered; still in choosing, it is well to 



and good bearer, and the fruit is excellent for 
shipping, as it will keep for a long time. 

It ripens shortly before Christmas and could 
be shipped to Northern cities, where during 
the holidays it would attract great attention. — 
Price, 75c. each. 

STRAWBERRY. 

purchase plants having as many good points 
as possible. This I claim for the Sucker State. 
It is bisexual; having both, stamens and 
pistils perfect. The foliage is very heavy, 
protecting the fruit from beating rains and 
hot sun. It is very prolific, large size, good 
quality, and cone shaped. Color bright red. 
very attractive, and in addition will ship well. 
I offer this variety at the following prices, viz. : 
60c. per 100; $5. UO per 1000. 




V 



Sucker State Strawberry. 



MITCHEL'S EARLY STRAWBERRY, 

This variety is claimed to be the earliest in cultivation. It makes perfect flowers and fruit. 
Very prolific. Price, 75c. per 100. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



13^. 



While any variety of the orange family will 
grow well on the Citrus trifoliata, I would ad- 
▼ise the use of the Satsuma and other hardy 
rarieties lately introduced from Japan for the 
colder portion of this new untried orange belt. 

The only objection that can be raised to the 
use of the Citrus trifoliata stock is, that it will 
produce smaller or dwarf trees. I do not con- 
sider this an objection but a quality; more 



trees can be planted in the same space, the 
fruit easier gathered, while the trees can be 
better managed and will be less exposed to 
damage from storms, high winds or tornadoes. 
G. DEVRON, M. D. 
I have but a limited supply of the above 
seed which I am offering at S2.50 per lb. ; 75c. 



per 



lib. 




Citrus Trifoliata. 



134 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



SEEDS OF RECENT INTRODUCTION AND OF SPECIAL MERIT. 



©warf Butter Wax Beans. 

This variety is also sold under the name 
of ''Bismarck" and ''Rust Proof Wax." It 
is very early, an excellent bearer, pods 
similar in shape to the Wardwell's D^^-arf 
Kidney Wax; they are very brittle and of a 
fine flavor. Not as liable to rust as other 
kinds. The seed is of a dark purple color 
when dried. = 

Oiaiit Pascal Celery. This is a 
selection fi'om the JSeic Golden Self-Blanch- 
ing Celery, it partakes of the best qualities 
of that variety, but is much larger and a 
better keeper. It is of a fine, nutty flavor; 
grows about two feet high; the stalks are 
very broad, thick and crisp and entirely 
stringless, the width and thickness of the 
stalks are distinctive features of this varie- 
ty. It bleaches with but shght ' 'earthing 
up" and very quick, usually in five or six 
days. 

Perfection Heart^t^ell Celery. 

This Celery is one of the best ever intro- 
duced, it has proven to be all that is 
claimed for it. For description see Page 36. 

Ne \v O r S e a i« sMn r k e t C «c ii m - 

ber. This Cucumber can not be excelled 
for under glass or out-door culture. It is 
almost exclusively iDlanted here by market 
gardeners for shipping, for which it has no 
equal. For description see page 42. 

Crescent City Ijnte Flat 
Dutcli Cabbage. This variety I have 
been selling for the last two years under the 
name of Xo. 1. It is the most uniform heading 
cabbage suitable for this section; heads are very 
large and solid. It is about two weeks earlier 
than my Superior Late Flat Dutch. Eecom- 
mend same very highly. Xew crop seed of 
this variety will be ready in July; have none 
in stock at present. 

Larg^e Flat Brnnswick Cab- 
bag^e. This cabbage has become very pop- 
ular with the Truck-farmers and gardeners in 
the South for a "Spring Croj)." It makes 
large, hard heads and does not wilt as quick as 
other varieties. The majority of Cabbage 
shipped in the Spring are gTOwn from this 
kind. For description see page 32. 

New Orleans Market £g:g;plant. 
This is the leading variety both for market and 
family use, fruit bears longer and keeps better 
than any other kind for shipping; it is oval and 
large in size. It is extensively grown here and 
in Florida for shipping pui-j^oses. The seed of 
this kind is Southern grown and is superior 
to Northern raised seeds. For description see 
page 43. 

New Orleans Improved Passion 
LfCttUCe. This is one of the best varieties 
of Lettuce for winter use. Heads very firm 
and solid. It is almost the only kind gi-own 
here for shipping, for which purpose it has no 
equal. For description see page 46. 




Giant Pascal Celery. 

Trocadero L.ettMce. This kind is 
very good for forcing and out-door culture; 
makes very large heads, similar to the fore- 
going kind; but it is not as hardy and does not 
bear shipping as well. For description see 
page 46. 

New Orleatis Market Melon. 
This is the largest and finest Musk Melon in 
cultivation. It is the only variety planted 
here for the market. For size and flavor it 
cannot be sui-passed by any other kind. For 
description see page 47. 

Oreen-Striped Casliaw Pump- 
kin. This is one of the best varieties for 
table use; superior to any of the Winter 
Squashes. For pies and preserves it cannot be 
excelled. For description see page 62. 

Wiiite Qneeji Potato. This va- 
riety is of recent introduction. Tubers are 
elongated oval and of large size ; skin and flesh 
white; is very mealy when boiled; it is quite 
productive and early. 

Tbe Tliorburn Potato. This is one 
of the earliest potatoes in ciiltivation, very 
productive and of fine cpiality. It is a seed- 
ling of the Beauty of Hebron; but is much 
earlier. For description see page 61. 
Rural l^ew Yorker No. 2 Potato. 
This variety I introduced here last year. It is 
of large size and uniisual smoothness of skin. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



135 



Tried last year, it did remarkably well. For 
description see page 61. 

£aiiy Sunrise Potato. This is a 
very early and fairly productive variety. It is 
a hybrid of the Early Eose; but much earlier. 
For desciiption see page 61. 



White Star Potato. A new medium 
early variety, producing tubers of good quali- 
ty and appearance. Baked or boiled its floury 
texture and delicious flavor are fine. It is 
large, oblong, and of uniform size; very pro- 
ductive, of good keeping qualities. Vines 
strong and dark green foliage. 



EXTRA CLEANED BIRD SEED. 

I make a specialty to put up choice re-cleaned bird seed in cartoons holding one pound. 
These cartoons contain a mixture of 

SBCILY CANARY, HEMP, CERMAN RAPE, 

AND GERMAN MILLET, 

all re-cleaned and of best quality. 

Have also plain Canary put up in same way, one pound cartoons; this is of the very best 
quality and also re-cleaned. Price, 10c. per cartoon; 3 cartoons, 2t5c. 

Have also in bulk, the above as well as Hemp, Rape and Millet. 

Cuttle Fish Bone, 5c. a piece; 50c. a pound. 



..—^ 



It is a gratification for me to receive letters from my patrons, expressing their opinion, as 
it is my constant endeavor to please them. The following are a few of the many I received the 
past year. 



Texas, January 13, 1890. 
Your seeds are the best I have tried for this 
climate, I sold all I got from you last year. 
B. EIVIERE. 

Louisiana, June 3, 1890. 
I planted your garden seed this past Spring 
and found them superior to any tried before. 
H. S.^ HUMBLE. 



Louisiana, June 16, 1890. 
Having tried your Golden Beauty Corn, I 
know of all its good qualities, especially as 
table corn. The ears are large, well shaped 
and filled to the extreme end. I measured 
one ear and found it to be 14 inches from end 
to end, and three inches in diameter. Every 
stalk has two ears and occasionally three. 
STANLEY MATHEWS. 



Louisiana, July 25, 1890. 
In the Spring I got seed of the Iron Clad 
Water Melon from you, which I sowed along- 
side of some Northern grown seed. Yours 
turned out all fine, large melons whilst the 
other kind did very poorly. 

W. H. WATTAM. 



Louisiana, March 29, 1890. 
I have been using your garden seed, and 
find them superior to all others. 

THOS. BAGLEY. 

Mississippi, February 2, 1890. 
I have been planting potatoes for past 36 
years ; but have never seen as fine seed potatoes 
as you sent me. F. BUETT:NEE.. 



Mississippi, January 9, 1890. 
We used your seeds last year, and they gave 
great satisfaction. G. T. STRAIT. 



Florida, January 27, 1890. 
Your seeds are always fine, as far as my ex- 
perience goes. T. H. ROUSE. 



Texas, January 25, 1890. 
I prefer your seed to any I ever used, for I 
think every one that is put in the ground comes 
up. Mrs. B. F. CAMERON. 



Mississippi, April 4. 1890. 
Your seeds give entire satisfaction both ixs 
to quantity and quality. 

M. W. CHAPMAN. 



136 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANiO AND GARDEN MANUAL 



PLANTER'S & GARDENER'S PRICE-LIST. 



COST OF MAILING SEED. 

Orders for ounces and ten cent papers are mailed free of postage, except 
JBeans^ Peas and Com. See page 4 in regard to seeds by maiL On orders 
by the pound and quart an advance of eight cents per pound and fifteen, 
cents per quart nuist he added to quotations for postage. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT. 

On all orders, amounting to $ 5.00 and over, 10% discount. 
« « a 10^00 " 12 



20.00 



15 



For larger quantities, special prices will be given on application. 
The above discount is on all seeds except Potatoes, Onion Sets, 
Shaltots^ Grass and IHeld Seeds, which are net cash. 



VARIETIES. 



artichoke:. 

Large Green Globe (Loan) 

ASPAKACiUS. 

Gonover's Colossal 



Boots 3 years old 



PRICES, 



Per ounce. 

$0 50 

10 
Per 100 



m 75 



Per quart. 
$0 20 

20 

25 

25 

40 

40 

25 

20 

20 

20 

.30 

20 

75 

40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 



$1 75 



20 
Per 1000 



6 00 



NOTE— Owing to ths continued rains at the time Beans 
were maturing m the section where they are grown, 
the quality has been very much injured, and crops 
were cut short. Samples are not as fine and bright 
in appearance as in former years. 

BEAWS— Owarf, Snap or Bus9a. 

Early Mohawk Six Weeks 

Early Yellow Six Weeks 

Dwarf German Wax, (siringless) 

Dwarf Golden Wax ^ 

Wardwell's Dwarf Kidney Wax tt 

Dwarf Flageolet or Perfection Wax -| 

Dwarf Butter Wax. (Bismarck) ^ 

White Kidney r 

Early China Red Eye -^ 

Red Kidney -e 

Best of All g 

Improved Valentine . ^ 

Henderson's New Bush Lima Beans ^ 

BEAi^S-Pole orRuBiiiing:* 6 

Large Lima Jf^ 

Carolina or Sewee r^ 

Southern Willow-Leaved Sewee or Butter ^ 

Horticultural or Wren's Egg t 

Dutch Case Knife .^ 

German Wax i stringless) S 

Southern Prolific ?^ 

Crease Back ^ 

Lazy Wife's 

Golden Wax Flageolet ... i 

Early Golden Cluster Wax [ 

BEA]¥S-£8ii:lish. 

^ Broad Windsor 25 

Prices for larger quantities given on application. 



Per peck. 

$1 75 

1 75 

1 75 

1 75 

2 50 
2 50 
1 75 
1 25 
1 25 

1 25 

2 00 
1 50 
5 00 



1 50 



Per lb. 

$6 00 

50 



Per bushel 

$6 00 

6 00 

6 50 

7 00 

8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 00 
8 00 

6 00 
20 00 



9 00 

9 00 

10 00 

7 00 

7 00 

9 00 

9 00 

9 00 

10 00 

10 00 

12 00 

5 00 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 




137 


VARIETIKS. 


PRICES. 


BEET. 

Extra Early or Bassano 

Siaion's Early Red Turnip 


Per ouuce. 
$0 10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

15 

30 
25 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
30 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
40 
25 
25 
25 
25 
"25 
25 

75 

75 

75 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

25 
40 
25 
30 
15 

15 
15 
15 


Per J lb, 
$0 20 
20 
20 
15 
20 
20 
25 
25 
15 
15 
25 

40 

1 00 

75 

60 

60 

75 

75 

75 

1 00 

75 

75 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 50 

1 00 

1 00 
60 
60 
75 
75 

2 50 
2 50 

2 50 

3 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 
6 00 

35 

25 
30 
25 
30 
30 
25 

75 
1 25 

75 

1 00 

50 

50 
50 
50 


Per lb. 
$0 50 
50 


Early Blood Turnip . . . 


50 


Long Blood . - . 


40 


Half Long Blood.. 

Egyptian Red Turnip 

Eclipse 

Lentz 

Long Red Mangel Wurzel ■ • 


50 
50 
75 
75 
40 


White French or Sugar 

Silver or Swiss Chard 

BORECOLE or CURLED KALE. 

Dwarf German Greens 

BROCCOLL Purple Cape. 


40 

75 

1 00 
4 00 


BRUSSELS SPROUTS 

CABBAGE. 

Early York 

Early Large York 

Early Su^ar Loaf 

Early Large Oxheart 

Early Winningstadt 

Jersey Wakefield 

Early Flat Dutch . . 

Early Drumhead 

Large Flat Brunswick 

Improved Large Late Drumhead 

Sui)erior Large Late Flat Dutch . 

Orescent City Large Late Flat Dutch 


3 00 

2 00 
2 00 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 
2 50 

2 50 

3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

5 00 


Improveil Early Summer 


3 00 


Red Dutch (for pickling) 

Green Globe Savoy 

Early Dwarf Savoy 


3 00 
2 00 
2 00 


Drumhead Savoy 

St. Denis or Choii Bonneuil 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Extra Early Paris 

Half Early Paris . : 

Early Erfurt 

LeNormand's Short Stemmed 

Early Italian Giant 

Late Italian Giant . . 


2 50 

3 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 


Algiers (fine) 

Early Snowball 

CARROTS. 

Eaidv Scarlet Korn . . 


12 00 
20 00 

1 00 


half Long Scarlet French .. 

Half Long Luc 


80 
1 00 


Improved Long Orange 

Long Red, without core 

St. Valerie 

Danver's Intermediate 

CELERY. 

Large White Solid (finest American) 


80 
1 00 

1 00 

80 

2 50 


Perfection Heartwell, (very fine) 


5 00 


Large Ribbed Dwarf 

Turnip-Rooted 

Gutting or Soup 

CHERVIL. 

Plain leaved 

COLLARDS 

CORN SALAD 


2 50 
4 00 
1 50 

1 50 
1 50 J 
1 50 



138 



EICHAKD FEOTSCHEE S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 



CORiV. 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar t: 

Adam's Extra Early § 

Early Sugar or Sweet . ^ 

Stowell's Evergreen Sugar S 

Golden Beauty . ; 

Champion White Pearl '^ ' 



Early Yellow Canada 

Large White Flint . . -: 5 g 

Blunt's Prolific, Field -"" 

Improved Learning 2 

Mosby's Prolific f 

Hickory King, (White) ^ £ 

^. B. — Prices for larger quantities given on application. 
CHESS. 

Curled or 'Pepper Grass 

Broad-leaved (grey seeded) 

Water Cress (True) 

CUCUMBEK. 

Improved Early White Spine 

Long Green White Spine or New Orleans Market 

Early Frame .. 

Long Green Turkey • 

Early Cluster . . ' 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling) 

EG^JPEANT. 

Large Purple, or New Orleans Market 

Early Dwarf Oval 

New York Market 

ENDIVE. 

Green Curled 

Extra Fine Curled . . 

Broad-leaved, or EscaroUe . 



KOHLRABI. 

Early White Vienna 

LEEK. 

Large London Flag, American grown 
Large Carentan " " 

EETTUCE. 

Early Cabbage or White Butter 

Improved Royal Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Coss 

Perpigrnan 

N. O. Improved Large Passion 

Trocadero 



MEEON, ITIUSK or CA]^TEEOUPE. 

Netted Nutmeg — 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple 

Early White Japan 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market (true) 

Osage 

MEEON, WATER. 
f 



Ice Cream (White Seeded), 

I Dark Icing 

I Rattlesnake (true) 

I Pride of Georgia 

1 Mammoth Iron-Clad 

Kolb Gem 

I Florida's Favorite 

t Seminole 



PRICES. 



Per quart. 
$0 25 
20 
20 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
20 

Per ounce. 
$0 10 

15 

50 

10 
15 

10 
10 
10 

20 

40 
30 
40 

20 
20 
20 

30 

20 
30 

20 
20 
20 
15 
20 
20 
20 
20 

10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
15 
25 

10 
10 
10 
15 
10 
15 
15 
15 



Per peck. 
$1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



25 
00 
25 
25 
00 
00 
00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



Per I lb. 
$0 35 
60 
1 75 

.25 
50 
25 
30 
25 



1 50 
1 25 
1 50 

75 
75 
75 

1 00 

65 
1 00 

60 
75 
75 
50 
75 
75 
75 
75 

35 
35 
35 
40 
40 
50 
1 00 

35 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
40 
40 



I Per bu.shel 

I $4 00 

i I 
\ t 



Per lb. 

$1 00 
2 00 
6 00 



FOR THB SOUTHERN STATES. 



139 



VARIETIES. 



MUSTARD. 

Large Curled . • 

Ohinese Large Leaved. . 
White or Yellow Seeded 



NASTURTIUM. 

Tall 

Dwarf 

OKRA. 

Green Tall Growing 

Dwarf Green 

White Velvet 



ONIOi\. 

Creole. (New crop ready in July) 

1TALIA]\ ONIO]^. 

New Queen 

Bermuda (true) 

ONIO]\ SETS. 

White 

Red or Yellow 



SHALLOTS.... 
PARSLEY. 

Plain Leaved 

Double Curled - 

Improved Garnishing 

PARSNIP. 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar 

PEAS. 

Extra Early, (First and Best) 

Alaska 

Tom Thumb 

Early Washington 

Laxton's Alpha 

Bishoi)'s Dwarf Long Pod 

Champion of England 

Carter's Stratagem. 

Carter's Telephone 

McLean's Advancer .. 

McLean's Little Gem 

LaKton's Prolific Long Pod 

Eugenie 

Dwarf Blue Imperial 

Royal Dwarf Marrow 

Black-Eyed Marrowfat 

Large White Marrowfat 

Dwarf Sugar 

Tall Sugar 

American Wonder 

Field or Cow Peas Market Price. 

PEPPER. 

Bell or Bull Nose 

Sweet Spanish Monstrous 

Long Red Cayenne 

Red Cherry 

Golden Dawn Mango 

Bird Eye 

Tabasco 

Chili 

Ruby King 

Red Cluster 



.s i 



PRICES. 



Per ounce. 
$0 10 

10 

05 



Per quart. 
20 
20 



Per ounce 
10 
10 
10 



10 

Per quart 
$0 25 

30 

25 

20 

25 

20 

25 

40 

40 

25 

25 

25 

25 

20 

20 

15 

20 

30 

30 

30 



Per ounce. 
30 
40 
30 
40 
30 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Per i lb. 
$0 25 
25 
15 



Per peck. 
Market Price. 



Per i lb. 
25 
25 
30 



25 

Per peck. 

$1 25 



25 
25 

GO 
50 
50 
50 
25 
25 
75 
50 



1 50 



Per 
1 



41b. 
00 



1 25 



Per lb. 

$0 75 
75 
40 



50 

50 
60 



Per bushel 



Per lb. 
75 
80 
1 00 



75 

Per bushel 

$5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

4 00 

6 00 

5 00 

5 00 
8 00 

7 00 

6 00 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
5 00 
3 50 
3 50 
3 50 

8 00 
8 00 

7 00 



Per lb. 

3 00 

4 00 

3 00 

4 00 
3 00 



4 00 



138 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 



I \ 



Extra Early Dwarf Sugar -^ 

Adam's Extra Early i 

Early Sugar or Sweet . ^ 

Sto well's Evergreen Sugar S 

Golden Beauty . 

Champion White Pearl — : lo 

Golden Dent Gourd Seed ^ 

Early Yellow Canada ;S 

Large White Flint ..i ^ 

Blunt's Prolific, Field -' 

Improved Leaming | 

Mosbv's Prolific 

Hickory King, (White) . ^ L 

N. B. — Prices for larger quantities given on application. 
CRESS. 

Curled or Pepper Grass 

Broad-leaved (<?rey seeded) 

Water Cress (True) 

CUCUMBER. 

Im] )ro ved Early White Spine 

Lons Green White Spine or New Orleans Market 

Earl y Frame . 

Lond Green Turkey . 

Early Cluster . . ' 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling) 

EOGPEAKT. 

Large Pur|)le, or New Orleans Market 

Early Dwarf Oval 

New York Market 

eivoive. 

Green Curled 

Extra Fine Curled 

Broad-leaved, or Escarolle 

KOHLRABI. 

Early White Vienna 

LEEK. 

Large London Flag, American grown 

Large Carentan " " 

LETTUCE. 

Early Cabbage or White Butter 

Improved Eo3*al Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Coss 

Perpigrnan 

N. O. Improved Large Passion 

Trocadero 

MELON, MUSK or CANTELOUPE. 

Netted Nutmeg 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple 

Early White Japan 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market (true) 

Osage 

MELON, WATER. 

Ice Cream (^White Seeded) 

Dark Icing . . 

Rattlesnake (true) : 

Pride of Georgia • 

\^ \ Mammoth Iron-Clad 

\%.\ Kolb Gem 

\'^' I Florida's Favorite 

[Seminole 



PRICES. 



Per quart. 
$0 25 
20 
20 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
20 

Per ounce. 
$0 10 

15 

50 

10 
15 

10 
10 
10 
20 

40 
30 
40 

20 
20 
20 

30 

20 
30 

20 
20 
20 
15 
20 
20 
20 
20 

10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
15 
25 

10 
10 
10 
15 
10 
15 
15 
15 



Per peck. 

$1 25 



00 
25 
25 
00 
00 
00 
00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

Per 1 lb. 
$0 35 
60 
1 75 

.25 
50 
25 
30 
25 



1 50 
1 25 
1 50 



75 

75 
75 

1 00 



Per bushel 
$4 00 

3 00 

4 00 



Per lb. 

$1 00 
I 2 00 
6 00 



80 
50 
80 
00 



2 50 



2 50 
2 50 
2 5© 

4 00 



65 


2 00 


00 


3 00 


60 


2 00 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


50 


1 50 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


35 


1 00 


35 


1 00 


35 


1 00 


40 


1 25 


40 


1 25 


50 


1 50 


00 


3 00 


35 


1 00 


30 


1 00 


30 


1 00 


30 


1 00 


30 


1 00 


30 


1 00 


40 


1 25 


40 


1 50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



13» 



VARIETIES. 



MUSTARD. 

Large Curled .• 

Chinese Large Leaved. . 
White or Yellow Seeded 

I¥ASTURTIUM. 

Tall 

Dwarf 

OtLUA. 

Green Tall Growing . . . 

Dwarf Green 

White Velvet 



ONIOW. 

Creole. (New crop ready in July) 

ITALIAIV ONIOJV. 

New Queen 

Bermuda (true) 

ONION SETS. 

White 

Red or Yellow 



PRICES. 



SMAI.I.OTS 

PARS1.EY. 

Plain Leaved 

Double Curled 

Improved Garnishing 

PARSNIP. 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar 

PEAS. 

Extra Early, (First and Best) 

Alaska 

Tom Thumb 

Early Washington 

Laxton's Alpha 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod 

Champion of England 

Carter's Stratagem 

Carter's Telephone 

McLean's Advancer .. 

McLean's Little Gem 

Laxton's Prolific Long Pod 

Eugenie 

Dwarf Blue Imperial 

Royal Dwarf Marrow 

Blaok-Eyed Mai ro wf at 

Large White Marrowfat 

Dwarf Sugar 

Tall Sugar 

American Wonder 

Field or Cow Peas Market Price. 

PEPPER. 

Bell or Bull Nose 

Sweet Spanish Monstrous 

Long Red Cayenne 

Red Cherry 

Golden Dawn Mango . . 

Bird Eye 

Tabasco 

Chili 

Ruby King 

Red Cluster 



Per 

$0 


ounce. 
10 
10 
05 




20 
25 




10 
10 
10 




25 

25 


Per 


quart. 
20 


Pel 


ounce. 

10 

10 



10 



10 



Per quart, 
$0 25 

30 

25 

20 

25 

20 

25 

40 

40 

25 

25 

25 

25 

20 

20 

15 

20 

30 

30 

30 



Per ounce. 
30 
40 
30 
40 
30 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Per i lb. 
$0 25 
25 
15 



20 

20 
20 



75 
75 



Per peck. 
Market Price. 



Per i lb. 
25 
25 
30 



25 



Per lb. 
$0 75 

75 
40 



50 
50 

60 



2 50 
2 50 



Per bushel 



Per lb. 
75 
80 
1 00 



75 



Per peek. 


Per bushel 


U 25 


$5 00 


1 25 


5 00 


1 25 


5 00 


1 00 


4 00 


1 50 


6 00 


1 50 


5 00 


1 50 


5 00 


2 25 


8 00 


2 25 


7 00 


1 75 


6 00 


1 50 


5 00 


1 50 


5 00 


1 50 


6 00 


1 50 


5 00 


1 00 


3 50 


1 00 


3 50 


1 00 


3 50 


2 00 


8 00 


2 00 


8 00 


2 25 


7 00 


Per i lb.- 


Per lb. 


1 00 


3 00 


1 25 


4 00 


1 00 


3 00 


1 25 


4 00 


1 00 


3 00 


1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 25 


4 00 


1 50 





140 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMA.NAO AND GARDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 


PRICES. 


POTATOES. 

f Burbank Seedling 

Peerless 

^ Early Rose 

•^ 1 Extra Earlv Vermont 


Per bnsbel 
$1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 

1 75 

2 00 
2 50 
2 00 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 

Per quart. 
$0 25 
Per ounce. 
$0 10 

10 

10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
10 
10 

15 
20 
25 
15 

10 
10 

10 
10 
15 
15 
15 

40 
25 
25 
40 
30 
25 
25 


Per barrel. 
$4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 

4 50 

5 00 

6 00 
5 00 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 

Per peck. 

$1 50 

Per i \h. 

$0 20 

25 

40 

20 
20 
25 
20 
20 
20 
20 
25 
35 
35 
30 
30 

75 
60 
75 
50 

20 
20 

25 
25 
50 
50 
50 

1 25 

75 

75 
1 25 
1 00 

75 

75 




<D O 


Early Beauty of Hebron 

White Elephant 

Rural Blush 

Early Sunrise 




°£ 


Rural New Yorker No. 2 . 




2" 


The Thorburn 




White Queen 

White Star 




[Snowflake 

POTATOES, SWEET. 

Spanish Yam 

Shanghai, or California Yam 

Prices vary according to market. Quotations 
given on application. 

PUIflPKIN. 

Kentuckv Field 


Per bushel 
$5 00 
Per lb. 

$0 m 

75 
1 00 

50 

60 


La 

Ca. 
Go 

RAfi 

Ea 
Ea 
Ye 
Ea 
VVl 
Sea 
Sea 
Blc 
Cb- 
Chj 
Wt 
Cal 

ROC 

SAL 

Sai 

SOR 

SPIJ 

Ext 
Brc 

Si|U 
Eai 
Loi 
Loi 
Th( 
Bos 

TOI? 

Kir 

Ext 
Eai 
Tro 
Lai 
Aci 
Par 


rge Cheese 


jhaw Crook-Neck (green striped) southern grown 
Iden Yellow Mammoth 

>ISH. 

rly Long Scarlet . . 

fly Scarlet Turnip 


low Summer Turnip. . 

rly Scarlet Olive-Shaped 

lite Sum trier Turnip . 

irlet H alf Long French , 

r!et Olive-Shaped, or French Breakfast 


80 
60 
60 
60 
60 


ck S[)anish (Winter) 

oese Rose (Winter) 


80 
1 00 


irtier 

it e Strassburg 

ifornia Mammoth 

^UETTE 


1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 


SIFY, American 

idwich Island (Mammoth) 

REE, (Broad-leaved 


2 00 
2 50 
1 50 


VACH. 

ra Large-leaved Savoy 

)ad-leaved Flanders 

ASH. 

•ly Bush, or Patty Pan 

ig Green, or Summer Crook-Neck 

idon Vegetable Marrow . 


50 
50 

75 
1 00 
1 50 


3 Hubbard ; 

ton Marrow 


1 25 
1 50 


lATO. 

g of the Earlies 


4 00 


ra Early Dwarf Red 

iy Large Smooth Red 

piiy, (selected) 


3 00 

3 00 

4 00 


^ge Yellow .. 

lie 

agon 


3 00 
2 50 

2 m 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



141 



VARIETIES. 


PRICES. 


TOM 4 TO.— Continued. 


Per ounce. 
$0 25 
25 
30 
40 
30 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

Per pack. 
$0 10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

Per lb. 

$0 15 
25 
20 
20 
30 
1 50 
30 
10 
10 

35 . 
15 
20 
20 
20 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 


Per 4 lb. 

$0 75 

1 00 

1 25 

75 

1 00 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 

Per 1 bn. 
3 00 

Market Frlcc. 


Per lb. 

$2 50 


Til ui i\ oqIom 'q Tn'ji.vnrif.p 


3 00 




4 00 


TTorsford's Prelude . 


5 00 


Dwarf Champion 

TURWfiP. 

"Rarlv Red or Piirnlt^ Tod (straD-leaved) 


4 00 
50 


Fi^rl V White FlMt Dutch fstrao-leaved) 


50 


Larp^e White Globe 

Wliitf^ St^rinQf 


50 
50 


Yellow Aberdeen 


50 


Golden Ball . . 


60 


Im{>roved Purple Top Rata Baga - . 


50 


Munich Early Purple Top 

Purple Top Globe.. 

White E2-i>- 


60 
50 
50 


S1¥EET AIVD MEOICIIVAL. HERBS. 

Anise 




Balm 




Basil .... 

Bene - 

Borage , 

Caraway 

Dill 

Fennel . . 




Lavender . .... 




Marjoram . . . 




Pot Marigold - 

Rosemary 

Rue 




Sage ■ 




Summer Savory .... 




Thyme 




Worm wood ! 




GRASS AMD FIELD SEEDS. 
Red Clover (Extra Cleaned 


Per bu'^hel 

$6 00 


White Dutch Clover 

Alsike Clover 


12 00 
10 00 


Alfalfa or French Lucerne 


10 00 


Lespedeza or Japan Clover 


5 00 


Bermuda Grass 

Kentuckv Blue Grass. (Extra Cleaned) Crop short 

Red Top Grass 

English Rye Grass 

Rescue Grass ... 


3 50 

1 00 

2 00 

4 00 


Johnson Grass. (Extra Cleaned) 


2 50 


Tall Meadow Oat Grass 


2 50 


Meadow Fescue Grass 


2 50 


Orchard Grass 


2 25 


Timothy 


2 50 


Hungarian Grass , ] 

German Millet 




Rye, Texas and Kansas \ 




Barley 

Texas Red Rust Proof Oats J 

Sorghum 


2 50 


Broom Corn ■ ■ ■ ■ .... 


2 50 


Dhouro or Egyptian Corn 




Buckwheat 


2 00 


Russian Sunflower " ;. 

Winter Vetch, (Vicia Sativa) 


4 00 



Burr or California Clover (measured) per quart, 10c. ; per bushel, $2.5<X 

N. B.— Prices for larger quantities given on application. 



142 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



a?:E:]3Ti]VEoisri A 31j3. 



Louisiana, February 11, 1890. 
The Cauliflower and Cabbage seed ordered 
from you sometime back did splendidly; no 
one can find cause to grumble at your seeds. 
J. H. McGEHEE. 

Mississippi, April 26, 1890. 
Your seeds have always given me much 
satisfaction; I expect to send you a large order 
next spring. JNO. W. HANES. 

Mississippi, April 11, 1890. 
Your seeds are truly suitable for the Southern 
climate, as those I bought of you sometime 
ago, have germinated and done better than 
any seed I ever planted before, and I have been 
trucking for eighteen vears. D. W. REED. 



I have always found them to be fresh and 



Louisiana, July 24, 1890. 
Corn purchased of yi u has turned out mag- 
nificently. W. C. CHEYIS. 

Mississippi, January 9, 1890. 
I have always found your seeds to be true 
to name, and could always rely upon them 
being as represented. 

A. H. HUMMEL. 



reliable. The Chautauqua Corn Planter gave 
me great satisfaction. 

JOSEPH L. ATKINSON. 



Floeida, February 24, 1890. 
I ordered seed from you last year through 
my merchant; they gave the best satisfaction 
of any I ever had. JEFF. D. GREEN. 



Louisiana, January 20, 1890. 
Your seeds gave entire satisfaction last 
season. W. J. WEBB. 



Louisiana, January 2; 1896. 
The seed obtained from you yield better and 
are of a superior quality to any I have tried. 
A. R. CLARK. 



Lout:siana, January 30, 1890. 
I have at present magnificent cabbages from 

the plants which I got fi-om you last fall, 
notv.ithstanding it was so dry at the time; all 
seeds ordered from you last year made a 
perfect success. MRS. C. S. KAY. 



Alabama, January 28, 1890. 
The fruit trees which I got from you reached 
me in good order; was very well satisfied with 
them. ^ HENRY STORK. 



Louisiana, July 29, 1890. 
I have three acres of Cauliflower grown from 
your seed. They are so fine that people come 
from a distance to look at them. 

MRS. O. L. HORTON. 



Texas, January 29, 1890. 
I am much pleased with your seeds, have 
been using them two years, and they have 
given entire satisfaction. 

MRS. S. I. BRYAN. 



iMissLssrppi, July 14, 1890. 
The Champion T\Tiite Pearl Corn which I 
procured from you last spring, proved to be 
the finest Corn I ever planted. Had fine and 
large roasting ears ready for table in seventy- 
six days from time of planting. 

G. FORKERT. 



I Texas, February 5. 1890. 

i I have been using cabbage all winter, grown 

j from Improved Early Summer seed procured 

i from you; they stood the cold at 20^ and are 

i still heading. Perfection Heartwell Celery 

' was elegant. I shipped some West, and I got 

; letters sn;v'ing that it was the most, beautiful 

! Celery they had received, and superior to any 

j got from INHchigan. C. M. DESEL. 



Louisiana, August 22, 1890. 
I like your seeds very much; have been 
using them for the i^ast thirteen years, and 



Louisiana, January 28, 1890. 
I must say that in a pretty long life with 
more than ordinary attention to gardening I 
have never seen better seed than those fur- 
nished by your house. 

DR. PETER RANDOLPH. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 143 



Cotto]7 Seed. 



THE HERLONG. 

This is one of the best varieties of cotton to be planted; it is very 
early, extremely prolific, more so than any other I have tried on my 
plantation. It has an advantage over the Peterkin in wet seasons; when 
there is plenty of rain it does not wash out like some other kinds. Staple 
only ordinary, bat quantity will make up for quality. 

Price, per bushel, $1.50; 5 bushels and over at $1.25. 

PETERKIN'S IMPROVED. 

This is a vigorous grower, a good producer, stands the drought bet- 
ter than common seed ; in general yield it equals the best prolific varieties 
known. It has a good staple, large bolls and small seed. 

Price, per bushel, $1.50; 5 bushels and over (a) $1.25. 

HAWKIN'S PROLIFIC. 

The originator claims for this cotton: tall growth, widely branching 
and vigorous, fruiting heavily from the bottom. It is the earliest, most 
prolific, easiest picked, most superior lint and finest staple, long tap root 
resisting drouth ; from two to four limbs near the surface, branching: 
two short limbs together all the way up the top, all covered with bolls; 
large bolls, small seed, yielding from thirty-eight to forty per cent lint; 
opens well, growing much taller than other varieties, every advantage 
over other kinds in yield per acre. With judicious manuring, quick and 
rapid culture up to fruiting time, cotton will grow an excellent yield, 
planted in Hawkins seed. I have had this kind tried this past season; 
but it did not do any better than the Peterkin. 

Price, $1.50 per bushel, five bushels (a) $1.25. 

This is an early kind, very prolific, grows perfectly erect and does 
not spread on the ground like other varieties. They can be easily culti- 
vated w^ith the plow. In harvesting they are easily gathered, as all the 
peas hang close to the roots. They mature in about three or four months. 
The stems, when harvested, make a very good quality of. hay. The fruit 
i.s smaller than the Virginia and other varieties; is very sweet and pods 
fill out well. Can be planted close in the row and drill, yields heavily 
I)er acre. A very good feed for fattening hogs. 

Price, per lb., 20c,; by mail, postpaid, 30c.; per peck, 50c. 

Have also the White Virginia and I^ed Tennessee Peanuts in stock. 
They are larger in size than the Spanish kind. They are of a spreading 
habit, and are cultivated in ridges like sweet potatoes. 

Price of White Virginia is 12c. per lb. 

Price of Red Tennessee is 10c. per lb. ; if by mail, 8c. per lb. extra 
must be added. 



144 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



INDEX, 



<♦»£ 



:^^ 



PAGE, 

Almanac 6 to 17 

Apricot Plum 127 

Artichoke 21 

Asparagus 21 

Bartlett Pear 122 

Beans, (Bush) , 21 

Beans, (Pole) . . . " 21 

Beans, (D-^-arf, Snap or Bush,) 22 to 24 

Beans, (Pole or Eunning) 24 to 26 

Beans, English 27 

Beets 27 to 29 

Bird Seed 135 

Borecole or Kale 29 

Broecoh 29 

Brussels Sprouts 29 

Bulbous Boots 105 to 108 

Cabbage 29 to 33 

Cauliflower 33 and 34 

Carrot ^ 34 to 36 

Celery 36 and 37 

Chervil 37 

Clapp's Favorite Pear 123 

CUmbing Plants 102 to 105 

Collards 37 

Corn Salad 37 

Corn, Indian 38 to 41 

Corn and Seed Planter .110 

Cotton Seed 143 

Cress 41 

Cucumber 41 and 42 

Directions for Planting 83 to 87 

Duchess D'Angouleme Pear 123 

Eggplant 42 and 43 

Endive 43 and 44 

Fig, Celeste or Celestial 129 

Fig, New White Adriatic 129 

Flower Seeds 87 to 102 

Garden Implements Ill and 112 

GarHc 44 

Grape Vines 128 

Grass and Field Seedfe 74 to 83 

Herb Seeds 74 

Hot Bed 18 and 19 

Howell Pear 123 

Idaho Pear 12o 

Japan Lilies 107 and 108 

Japan Persimmon . 128 

Jefferson Pear 123 

Jerusalem Artichoke 118 

Kaffir Corn ' 119 

Kelsey's Japan Plum 127 

Kieffer's Hybrid Pear 122 

Kohlrabi 44 

Le Conte Pear 121 and 122 



Leek 44 and 45 

Letter on "Alfalfa" 117 and 118 

Letter on Pecan Culture 131 to 133 

Lettuce 45 and 46 

Marianna Plum 126 

Matthews' Hand Cultivator 109 

Melon, Musk 46 and 47 

Melon, Water 47 to 50 

Mtchel's Early Strawberry 130 

Mustard 50 

Nasturtium 50 

New York Seed Drill 109 

Ogan and Botan Plums 127 

Okra 61 

Onion - 51 to 53 

Parsley 63 

Parsnip 63 

Peach Trees - 128 

Peen-To or Flat Peach of China 128 

Peas 54 to 56 

Pecans, Louisiana Soft Shell 131 

Pepper 57 and 58 

Pomegranate, "Spanish Kuby" 130 

Potatoes 58 to 62 

Pumpkin 62 

Price-list, Planters and GardenersM36 to 141 
Price-List, Garden Implements . . . .113 to 117 

Radish , 63 and 64 

Remarks on Raising Vegetables for 

Shipping 4 and 5 

Roquette '64 

Salsify 64 and 65 

Satsuma or Blood Plum 125 

Seeds by Mail 4 

Seeds of Special Merit 134 

Shallots 53 

Sorghum . 119 

Sorrel 65 

Sowing Se^ds 19 

Spinach 65 

Spanish Peanuts 143 

Squash 65 and 66 

Sucker State Strawberry. .]30 

Teosinte. 119 

Testimonials 118, 135 and 142 

Tobacco Seed 74 

Tomato . . 66 to 70 

Trees, how to plant, etc 120 

Turnip 70 to 73 

Table showing Quantity of Seed required 

to the Acre 20 

Vegetable Garden .' 18 

Wild Goose Plum ." : .128 



144 




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